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What is an algorithm to get the nth element of a rectangular tiled spiral? 1

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Is this homework? –  Jonathan M Apr 10 '12 at 18:58
    
No. This is avoiding reinventing the wheel and helping others who could further be searching for this with clear terms. –  Viclib Apr 10 '12 at 18:59
    
looks like homework. Show us some work and we can help you. –  gbianchi Apr 10 '12 at 19:00
    
From the origin, are the first two steps to the right then down? –  Jonathan M Apr 10 '12 at 19:01
1  
@Viclib, having flagged this one as a favorite, I came back to it after over a year and a half. My answer is below. Hope you like it. –  Jonathan M Dec 15 '13 at 6:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's a short and sweet answer using just simple math in pseudocode. No conditionals and no iteration. Given tileNum for the tile number:

intRoot=int(sqrt(tileNum));

x=(round(intRoot/2)*(-1^(intRoot+1)))+((-1^(intRoot+1))*(((intRoot*(intRoot+1))-tileNum)-abs((intRoot*(intRoot+1))-tileNum))/2);

y=(round(intRoot/2)*(-1^intRoot))+((-1^(intRoot+1))*(((intRoot*(intRoot+1))-tileNum)+abs((intRoot*(intRoot+1))-tileNum))/2);

Here's a fiddle to see it in action.

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2  
How did you do that? –  Viclib Dec 15 '13 at 19:04
1  
Beautiful. Like @Viclib, I'd also like to see an explanation. –  PyNewb Jul 22 at 17:04

Similar questions exist already... See my non-looping version. You may need to swap and/or negate X/Y coordinates and change the 100's to 0's depending on what orientation and origin you want.

There's also more canonical looping versions.

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So can we say this is dup of any of them? they all refer to the same point. –  gbianchi Apr 10 '12 at 19:09
    
Probably, but it's a common question that doesn't seem to be easy to search for, so the wider the net, the more likely it'll catch future searches. It's not all bad. -- although, I admit, it doesn't seem THAT hard to search for. –  Kaganar Apr 10 '12 at 19:10

Here's my solution in javascript using inverse sum of 8 and edge numbering

Complexity : O(1) no iteration loop

function spiral(n) {
    // given n an index in the squared spiral
    // p the sum of point in inner square
    // a the position on the current square
    // n = p + a

    var r = Math.floor((Math.sqrt(n + 1) - 1) / 2) + 1;

    // compute radius : inverse arithmetic sum of 8+16+24+...=
    var p = (8 * r * (r - 1)) / 2;
    // compute total point on radius -1 : arithmetic sum of 8+16+24+...

    en = r * 2;
    // points by edge

    var a = (1 + n - p) % (r * 8);
    // compute de position and shift it so the first is (-r,-r) but (-r+1,-r)
    // so square can connect

    var pos = [0, 0];
    switch (Math.floor(a / (r * 2))) {
        // find the face : 0 top, 1 right, 2, bottom, 3 left
        case 0:
            {
                pos[0] = a - r;
                pos[1] = -r;
            }
            break;
        case 1:
            {
                pos[0] = r;
                pos[1] = (a % en) - r;

            }
            break;
        case 2:
            {
                pos[0] = r - (a %en);
                pos[1] = r;
            }
            break;
        case 3:
            {
                pos[0] = -r;
                pos[1] = r - (a % en);
            }
            break;
    }
    console.log("n : ", n, " r : ", r, " p : ", p, " a : ", a, "  -->  ", pos);
    return pos;
}

Demo : Fiddle

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Good work. Just in time! –  Viclib Oct 10 '13 at 14:20

First, find out which ring your desired element is in (hint: until you get to the outer ring, your spiral is made up of nested squares), then which side (of the 4) it is on, then you're just left with its position on that side.

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As nobody answered, there is a solution:

def square_spiral(total_steps):
    position = (0,0)
    direction = (1,0)
    turn_steps = [floor(((x+2)**2)/4) for x in range(n+2)]
    for step in range(total_steps):
        if (step in turn_steps):
            direction = (-direction[1],direction[0])
        position = tuple(a+b for a,b in zip(position,direction))
    return position

This simulates a walk through the desired path. You start at position (0,0), walk 1 step to the right, 1 step down, 3 steps left, 3 steps up, and so on, following the spiral. To code this, notice that we are changing our direction on steps of numbers 1, 2, 4, 6, 9, 12, 16, 20 and so on. https://oeis.org/ reveals this is the quarter-square integer sequence. So all we need is a loop where each iteration simulates a step, adding the direction to the position and turning it 90º when the step count is part of the sequence.

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