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So this might have been answered in a more general form but here is a more specific case and I want to get ideas how this should be solved. I am writing a WPF application and attempting to use an MVVM pattern (first time using this pattern).

My domain object, Viper, has several properties and collections and is used throughout several existing applications. I have now implemented INotifyPropertyChanged on all properties I want to bind in my new WPF app. I am now creating a view model to sit between the domain object and the WPF view. Problem is that all of the properties that are collections in the Viper object are Lists not ObservableCollections. I cannot simply make them ObservableCollections as this will impact all other applications using this object model (does not support things like AddRange, etc).

This new WPF app maintains a list of Viper objects that will be used (via a view model) to control the GUI. To make things a little more complicated, the app will receive data in the form of a List<Viper> data. The app loops through this list of Viper objects and merges each incoming Viper data into an existing Viper (by index). So lets say my incoming Viper object adds an item to the Events property of an existing Viper (List<Event>), since this is not an ObservableCollection the GUI will not update the grid of events. Even if I convert the List<Event> to OC<Event> in the view model it's the underlying Viper object that does this merge of all the properties and collections, not the view model so still the modification fires no event since the view models OC was not updated. The Viper object and all sub-objects implement a custom MergeWith() function that determines how incoming data should merge. Some perform a replace, some append, some update.

What is the proper way to handle this situation? Let me know if anything is unclear.

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3 Answers 3

There are two ways in MVVM to expose properties of a Model to the View from the ViewModel: either by exposing the entire Model to the View, or by exposing individual properties that the View cares about in the ViewModel.

Both methods are equally valid, although which you use often depend on the situation.

In your case, where you have to work with existing Model objects that are not designed to notify the UI of changes, I would use the second method of creating properties in the ViewModel for the View.

For example,

<DataGrid ItemsSource="{Binding SelectedViper.Events}" />
public class ViperViewModel : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private Viper _selectedViper;

    public Viper SelectedViper 
    { 
        get { return _selectedViper; }
        set
        {
            if (value != _selectedViper)
            {
                _selectedViper= value;
                RaisePropertyChanged("SelectedViper");
            }
        }
    }
}

would become:

<DataGrid ItemsSource="{Binding ViperEvents}" />
public class ViperViewModel : INotifyPropertyChanged;
{
    private Viper _selectedViper;
    private ObservableCollection<Event> _viperEvents;

    public ViperViewModel()
    {
        this.PropertyChanged += ViperViewModel_PropertyChanged;
    }

    void ViperViewModel_PropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.PropertyName == "SelectedViper")
        {
            if (SelectedViper == null)
                ViperEvents = null;
            else
                ViperEvents = new ObservableCollection<Event>(SelectedViper.Events);
        }
    }

    public Viper SelectedViper
    { 
        get { return _selectedViper; }
        set
        {
            if (value != _selectedViper)
            {
                _selectedViper= value;
                RaisePropertyChanged("SelectedViper");
            }
        }
    }

    public ObservableCollection<Event> ViperEvents
    { 
        get { return _viperEvents; }
        set
        {
            if (value != _viperEvents)
            {
                _viperEvents = value;
                RaisePropertyChanged("ViperEvents");
            }
        }
    }
}

It's a little more work up front, but it makes maintenance much simpler

As an alternative, you can overwrite the ObservableCollection class and implement the List<T> methods you're interested in. For example, I have an ObservableCollectionEx class that currently implements Contains, IndexOf, AddRange, and RemoveRange. There's an example of the Sort method here if you're interested.

Of course, this also means you might have to update everything else that uses that property to use an ObservableCollectionEx<T> instead of a List<T>

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1  
Hmm, if I create a new ObservableCollection each time the Viper object gets updated I will have to rebind the GUI to it since it is a new entity right? At that point I could just bind the GUI to the List and rebind it each time it is updated. If I go with replacing the Lists with the ObservableCollectionEx approach isn't there a performance penalty even for projects using the Viper object that do not require notifications? –  mdutra Apr 11 '12 at 14:51
    
@mdutra You would want to create a new ObservableCollection (or CollectionViewSource) anytime the actual Viper object changes to a new object, however if you're only updating the existing object then you should be fine manually raising the PropertyChanged event. –  Rachel Apr 11 '12 at 16:33
    
@mdutra As for your second question about ObservableCollectionEx, there can be performance issues with raising the PropertyChanged notification more than necessary, but that depends on how you write the methods. For example, AddRange could add each item one at a time and raise a change notification for each item added, or it could add them all at once and raise a single change notification –  Rachel Apr 11 '12 at 16:34
1  
I am still confused a bit. The Viper object has an Events property that is a List<Event>. Unless I change that property to be OC<Event> in the domain model then each time I update the List<> I would either need to update a completely separate OC<> that I created specifically to bind to a grid (or some UI control) or just rebind the grid. My question is if I have a Viper.Events (List<Event) property from a domain object that will only be updated, how should I bind that to a UI grid? If I am to use a viewmodel how do I link them together in a way that does not just duplicate that data? –  mdutra Apr 13 '12 at 12:29
    
@mdutra It's hard to tell what you should do without knowing how your entire application interacts with the models, however it's sounding like in your case, you need a ViewModel or WPF version of the Model to use when working with Viper objects in WPF. List<T> does not contain change notification, so will not notify other objects about changes to it. I suppose you could also add an OC<T> version of the Events collection to the Viper class for when you're using WPF, but that depends on how your application is structured. –  Rachel Apr 13 '12 at 12:56

The idea here basically to keep the same collection in the binding and suppress notifications until you need them.

public class Oc<T> : ObservableCollection<T>
{
    private object _lockObject;
    private bool _suppressChangeNotification;

    protected override void OnCollectionChanged(NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (!_suppressChangeNotification)
            base.OnCollectionChanged(e);
    }

    public void Merge(IEnumerable<T> newItems )
    {           
        //don't know if you need a lock..that's your determination
        lock (_lockObject)
        {
            _suppressChangeNotification = true;
            foreach (var newItem in newItems)
            {
                //whatever you do here, insert/remove based on some condition
                //i'll just put insert for now
                InsertItem(0,newItem);
            }
             _suppressChangeNotification = false;
             OnCollectionChanged(new NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs(NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Reset));
        }
    }
}
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One way to solve this would be to add a Merged event to the Viper object which is being called in MergeWith(). This way your view model can subscribe to that event and update itself as the updates happen.

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