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I've been trying to get the following guarded mixins to work correctly in our LESS stylesheets:

#font {
    .body( @size: 15px, @lineHeight: 18px, @weight: normal ) {
        font: @weight @size~"/"@lineHeight Arial, sans-serif;
    }
    .marginLeft( @margin ) when ( @margin = 0 ) { }
    .marginLeft( @margin ) when not ( @margin = 0 ) {
        margin-left: @margin;
    }
    .marginTop( @margin ) when ( @margin = 0 ) { }
    .marginTop( @margin ) when not ( @margin = 0 ) {
        margin-top: @margin;
    }
    .DinBold( @size: 14px, @lineHeight: 20px, @offsetTop: 0, @offsetLeft: 0 ) {
        #font > .marginLeft( @offsetLeft );
        #font > .marginTop( @offsetTop );
        font: @size~"/"@lineHeight 'DINBold', Arial, sans-serif;
    }
}

The idea here being that if any of the font offsets are zero, I don't want the margin style to be set. Now, it works fine when the two parameters are non-zero, like:

#font > .DinBold( 42px, 42px, -7px, -3px );

But the moment @offsetLeft is 0, either explicitly or implicitly:

#font > .DinBold( 42px, 42px, -7px );

or

#font > .DinBold( 42px, 42px, -7px, 0 );

it seems that even the margin-top won't be exposed. The same thing happens if you flip it around, putting the marginTop mixin before the marginLeft mixin, and passing in 0 for @offsetTop instead, which seems to suggest to me that the first time an empty mixin is hit, all subsequent mixin calls might be ignored - any insights on this?

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That is certainly unusual behavior. As far as I can tell your bundle and mixins look to be correct, so it could be an issue with LESS itself. Might want to look at opening a ticket on the project's git repo. One thing I tried was using a fraction for the value I wanted to be zero, so 0.1px instead of just 0. and the margin attributes showed. I don't believe CSS handles fractions, so it would likely be interpreted as 0. –  Jonathan Miller Apr 16 '12 at 13:05
1  
Looks like they finally put in a fix for this that should be going out with the next release: github.com/cloudhead/less.js/issues/773#issuecomment-7522445 –  Johnny Aug 6 '12 at 17:43

2 Answers 2

I've just been struggling with the same issue, reworking some LESS that compiled fine with lessphp, but not with lessjs. Seems empty mixins prevent all following mixins in the same ruleset or containing mixin from rendering. But put any content in the empty mixin and everything works fine.

So the simple solution was to put a LESS comment (//) in the empty mixin, to my surprise this worked fine. Just two simple forward slashes on their own line with nothing else, LESS comments won't render in the output CSS, so you have your empty mixin.

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I scrapped the previous answers, since they were not working for you. I am rather surprised that they don't work, since the LESS information would seem to indicate that it should be able to handle a non-zero case.

I have a new idea, however, based on pattern matching. Try the following. It is designed to allow you to pass in only two parameters if no margin is to be set, or four parameters, but the third parameter could be "top" or "left" to allow the fourth parameter to only set one or the other, or you can pass two numbers and set both top and left (in that order). This avoids calling the .marginLeft/Top if not needed, and accepts a 0 if you choose to pass one in.

#font {
    .body( @size: 15px, @lineHeight: 18px, @weight: normal ) {
        font: @weight @size~"/"@lineHeight Arial, sans-serif;
    }
    .marginLeft( @margin ) when isnumber(@margin) {
        margin-left: @margin;
    }
    .marginTop( @margin ) when isnumber(@margin) {
        margin-top: @margin;
    }

    .DinBold( @size: 14px, @lineHeight: 20px) {
        font: @size~"/"@lineHeight 'DINBold', Arial, sans-serif;
    }

    .DinBold( @size: 14px, @lineHeight: 20px, top, @offsetTop: 0 ) {
        #font > .marginTop( @offsetTop );
        font: @size~"/"@lineHeight 'DINBold', Arial, sans-serif;
    }

    .DinBold( @size: 14px, @lineHeight: 20px, left, @offsetLeft: 0 ) {
        #font > .marginLeft( @offsetLeft );
        font: @size~"/"@lineHeight 'DINBold', Arial, sans-serif;
    }

    .DinBold( @size: 14px, @lineHeight: 20px, @offsetTop: 0, @offsetLeft: 0 ) {
        #font > .marginLeft( @offsetLeft );
        #font > .marginTop( @offsetTop );
        font: @size~"/"@lineHeight 'DINBold', Arial, sans-serif;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hey Scott, if I remember correctly, LESS threw compilation errors at me when I removed the zero case, saying that no method was defined. As for the second solution, margin: auto is not the same as no margin, if I'm not mistaken, which results in the browser causing weird margin offsets when set to auto... –  Johnny May 7 '12 at 18:11
    
@Johnny--Interesting about the compilation error. Regarding the other, I assumed by your statement "I don't want the margin style to be set" if it is the zero case, that you meant auto. But you are correct, I think in most cases margin is 0 by default. Is there a reason not to set it to 0? Also, I'm about to add a third possible solution I thought of. –  ScottS May 7 '12 at 20:06
    
@Johnny--it does seem odd that the first case would throw a compilation error. You should be able to put such a guard condition without anything else. I added the third idea, which uses two when statements, still without a zero case however (but maybe it is the when not that causes the compilation error). –  ScottS May 7 '12 at 20:12
    
Actually, your third solution was the first one I tried, before doing the when not. Unless I'm not remembering correctly, LESS just didn't like the fact that there wasn't anything to handle the 0 case. And I don't want to explicitly specify a margin-left: 0 because that will sometimes inadvertently override some higher/generic shared styles –  Johnny May 14 '12 at 22:13
    
@Johnny--Weird. It doesn't make sense based off the LESS documentation. However, I "rethought" about your problem and have proposed a totally new answer. –  ScottS May 15 '12 at 1:15

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