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Here is my code:

public class Test
{
   static 
   {
      main(null);
   }
   public static void main(String [] args)
   {
      System.out.println("done");
   }
}

I am getting the following output:

done 
done

Can somebody please explain me the reason for this?

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1  
Please read this. –  mre Apr 10 '12 at 20:14

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What do you think unusual? The static block is executed once when the class is loaded (and it has to be loaded before executing main method. Then the main method itself is executed.

Check out this modified version:

public class Test {
    static {
        main(new String[]{"[done static]"});
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(args.length > 0 ? args[0] : "[done]");
    }
}

It prints:

[done static]
[done]
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we are passing null as argument in main method present in static,it should be string –  love with java Apr 10 '12 at 20:19
    
I am getting only confused due to null argument present in main method inside static block,please tell me that will it create any problem or not, because main method expect a String type as argument –  love with java Apr 10 '12 at 20:28
    
@saurabhRai: main method expectes String array, not a String. Also the null is not quite correct because the main method is always supplied with arguments array by the JVM - and if there are no arguments, this array is empty, but not null. –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Apr 10 '12 at 20:30
    
@Tomsaz thanks a lot ,for clearing my basic doubts –  love with java Apr 10 '12 at 20:38

The reason is that main is called twice:

  1. Explicitly, from the static initialization block as soon as the class is loaded.
  2. Implicitly, on program entry as soon as the program starts.

How to fix this? Either don't call it explicitly or rename it so that it won't be called automatically.

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Because

  • the static { ... } part is called when the class Test is loaded inside the JVM (it's a sort of static constructor)
  • while the main method is called when the execution begins.
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The static block of a class is invoked when the class is first loaded. That is the first done. The second one is because you are running the program and then the main method is invoked.

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whatever you are telling me that i know but the question is ,we are passing null as argument in main method present in static ,it should have some string –  love with java Apr 10 '12 at 20:17
    
Since you are not using the parameters passed to main it does not matter what you are passing to main method. It will just be invoked. –  Rafa de Castro Apr 10 '12 at 20:25
    
thanks ,finally you provide the solution i am looking for –  love with java Apr 10 '12 at 20:31

The main is automatically called by the virtual machine when it loads the jar. So this is the first 'Done', the normal entry point for a Java program.

The second 'Done' is written because you explicitly call it in the static class initializer. The 'static' section that you added to your 'Test' class is called as soon as your class is loaded by the virtual machine class loader.

The one should from the static initializer even be called before the entry point Main is called, as the class needs to be loaded before the entry point is called.

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Before calling Test.main, JVM needs to initialize the Test class by running its static initializer. This call is responsible for the first call of main(). Once the initialization is complete, JVM calls main() again, ultimately producing the output that you see.

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Main is automatically called by JVM. There is not need to call it in a static section.

public class Test
{
   public static void main(String [] args)
   {
      System.out.println("done");
   }
}

The above code is what it should be.

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