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Given the following Java code:

class mainul {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

    /*block 1*/
        B b1 = new B();
        A a1 = b1;
        a1.m1(b1);

    /*block 2*/
        B b2 = new B();
        B a2 = b2;
        b2.m1(a2);
    }
}

class A {

    public static void p(Object o) {
        System.out.println(o.toString());
    }

    public void m1(A a) {
        p("m1(A) in A");

    }
}

class B extends A {

    public void m1(B b) {
        p("m1(B) in B");
    }
}

Can someone shed some light to why the output of this program is

m1(A) in A
m1(B) in B

One would expect the output of block 1 to be "m1(B) in B" due to the fact the dynamic type of a1 is B. I noticed that the function signatures in A and B for m1 do not match(one expects an object of type A and the other of B as its argument) and the method in A seems to get priority but can't really link this to my output as it doesn't seem to be consistent with the output of block2.

Thanks for your time

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4 Answers 4

As you noticed, B.m1(B) does not override A.m1(A), as they take different arguments (try adding the @Override annotation and you'll see the compiler complain). So so it can never be called via a reference to an A.

It can, however, be called via a reference to a B.

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indeed, make it expect an A instance, and it'll work. –  MDeSchaepmeester Apr 10 '12 at 21:18

The two method signatures are different as Oli said.

When you call each of them here :

    B b1 = new B();
    A a1 = b1;
    a1.m1(b1);

    /*block 2*/
    B b2 = new B();
    B a2 = b2;
    b2.m1(a2);

You first pass an object of type A, then pass an object of type B. That is all Java is concerned with in this context, it does not care about what you made the object from, just what it is.

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Also, by the way you have set it up, did you intend to have a toString method for each object, then pass the object to the your p(Object o) method –  dann.dev Apr 10 '12 at 21:22

The method being called is set at compile time (in this case A.m1(A)). I know you think it's dynamic right? Dynamic binding is runtime binding. Well yes it is, but it's dynamic only to the method on A.m1(A). So any subclass of A can provide an alternate implementation, but its signature must be the same otherwise that's an overloaded method which is not the same method.

This also means the parameters used in a call aren't taken into account for dynamic binding. The method name, and formal signature is set at compile time. Change the types and it's not the same method and won't be called.

You can do this to force the compiler to see the method:

a1.m1( (A)b1 )

That tells the compiler which method you are trying to call.

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Just follow the code :

block 1

B b1 = new B();   //- variable  b1 (type is B) points to instance of B() 

A a1 = b1;        //- variable  a1 (type is A) points to instance of B() .. same as b1 is
                  // pointing to.

 a1.m1(b1);       // Call Method m1 on a1 (i.e. of class A ) ..IMP catch > as a1 holds
                  // object of b1, if there is method in Class A which is overriden in B,
                  // call that overriden method. But here method m1() is not overriden 
                  // by B  it will call method of class A.

block 2

B b2 = new B();  // variable b2 (type B) points to instance of B()

B a2 = b2;       // variable a2 (type B) points to same instance as b2 is pointing to.

b2.m1(a2);       // call method m1 of b2 (of class B). There is only one method m1 in b2
                 // and b2 holds object of B, it must call method of class B

Also if you want out of block 1 to be "m1(B) in B" , just mark method in class A as virtual and override the same in class B.

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