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I'm writing a python script that performs a series of operations in a loop, by making subprocess calls, like so:

os.system('./svm_learn -z p -t 2 trial-input model')
os.system('./svm_classify test-input model pred')
os.system('python read-svm-rank.py')
score = os.popen('python scorer.py -g gold-test -i out').readline()

When I make the calls individually one after the other in the shell they work fine. But within the script they always break. I've traced the source of the error and it seems that the output files are getting truncated towards the end (leading me to believe that calls are being made without previous ones being completed).

I tried with subprocess.Popen and then using the wait() method of the Popen object, but to no avail. The script still breaks.

Any ideas what's going on here?

share|improve this question
    
os.system and subprocess.call both wait for the system call to complete before returning. If you want help debugging your program we're going to need more info. Also os.system('python read-svm-rank.py') looks highly suspect to me, would it be possible to import what you need from read-svm-rank.py? – Bi Rico Apr 10 '12 at 21:39
1  
Are your files on a remote filesystem (like NFS) by any chance? – amcnabb Apr 10 '12 at 21:45
    
The user actually solved their own problem and posted their solution as a comment on a deleted answer. It was caused by files not being closed, and so not flushed out to disk. – agf Apr 11 '12 at 4:38

I'd probably first rewrite a little to use the subprocess module instead of the os module.

Then I'd probably scrutinize what's going wrong by studying a system call trace: http://stromberg.dnsalias.org/~strombrg/debugging-with-syscall-tracers.html

Hopefully there'll be an "E" error code near the end of the file that'll tell you what error is being encountered.

Another option would be to comment out subsets of your subprocesses (assuming the n+1th doesn't depend heavily on the output of the nth), to pin down which one of them is having problems. After that, you could sprinkle some extra error reporting in the offending script to see what it's doing.

But if you're not put off by C-ish syscall traces, that might be easier.

share|improve this answer
    
The user actually solved their own problem and posted their solution as a comment on a deleted answer. It was caused by files not being closed, and so not flushed out to disk. – agf Apr 11 '12 at 4:32

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