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okay, i'm curious why gcc calls this an ambiguity. check this:

class base_stream
{
public:
    std::string m_buffer;
};

class idatastream : public base_stream
{

};

class odatastream : public base_stream
{

};

class datastream : public idatastream, public odatastream
{
public:
    void dostuff( m_buffer = "some text";) // reference is ambiguous?
};

i declare m_buffer only once in base_stream, and do not redeclare it in the inheriting classes, so why is it that when i inherit from both the inheriting classes, m_buffer is ambiguous? the error says this:

||In member function 'void datastream::dostuff()':|
|22|error: reference to 'm_buffer' is ambiguous|
|6|error: candidates are: std::string base_stream::m_buffer|
|6|error: std::string base_stream::m_buffer|
||=== Build finished: 3 errors, 0 warnings ===|

i'm confused here because the valid candidates are the same. when i change the defintion of dostuff to:

void dostuff() {base_stream::m_buffer = "test string";}

, like it suggests, i get this error:

||In member function 'void datastream::dostuff()':|
|22|error: 'base_stream' is an ambiguous base of 'datastream'|
||=== Build finished: 1 errors, 0 warnings ===|

This is where i think the heart of the problem lies. Am i not able to inherit from two classes that inherit from the same class?

share|improve this question
4  
Google "diamond problem c++". –  cHao Apr 10 '12 at 22:19
    
ha. Diamond. I get it. So marking each of the classes that inherit from the base as virtual before doing multiple inheritance of them will avoid ambiguity and make sure it's only inherited once? simple and thank you :P. –  FatalCatharsis Apr 10 '12 at 22:23
    
possible duplicate of virtual derivation & conversion ambiguous –  Bo Persson Apr 10 '12 at 22:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to inherit idatastreamand odatastream from base_streamusing virtual inheritance.

So something like this might work.

class base_stream
{
public:
    std::string m_buffer;
};

class idatastream : virtual public base_stream
{

};

class odatastream : virtual public base_stream
{

};

class datastream : public idatastream, public odatastream
{
public:
    void dostuff( m_buffer = "some text";) // reference is ambiguous?
};

So in this case only one copy of base_stream will exist inside data_stream which makes it possible to access m_buffer in data_stream.

I hope I answered your question.

share|improve this answer
    
yup, just read about the diamond problem like chao suggested. didn't know it was called that :\ . anyway, glad that c++ provides functionality specifically for this purpose :P –  FatalCatharsis Apr 10 '12 at 22:25

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