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Let's say I have these models:

class A(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=32)
    b = models.ForeignKey("B", null=True)
    def __unicode__(self):
        return self.name

class B(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=32)
    def __unicode__(self):
        return self.name

And this view:

def DisplayIt(request):
    html = ""
    for a in A.objects.all():
        html += "<input type='text' value='" + a.b.name + "' />"

This works fine as long as every A has a reference to a B in field b. But, I have null=True on the b reference field. When b is None, an exception is thrown that NoneType has no function name, which is completely expected.

Obviously, I can do this:

def DisplayIt(request):
    somestring = ""
    for a in A.objects.all():
        if a.b is not None:
            somestring += a.b.name

BUT, I don't want to do this if I don't have to. So, is there a way to get b.name or None if b is None, WITHOUT putting an if a.b is not None: in each loop? My real world example is much more complex, and I am creating a temporary object for display out of actual database fields... suffice it to say I'd prefer not to have all of those if statements, and wasn't sure if there was another built-in function to get there. I could also create a class method to get each of these foreign fields if they exist or blank if they don't, but I'm not sure this is the best way to go, either.

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I mentioned this in my answer, but stop trying to produce HTML in the view by concatenating strings, and use the templating feature. –  Josh Smeaton Apr 10 '12 at 23:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Make the database do it for you.

Use a cross-relation filter to get all A with a b with name which is not null:

def DisplayIt(request):
    somestring = ""
    for a in A.objects.filter(b__name__isnull=False):
        somestring += a.b.name

To do this such that dummy values are included when a.b is None, use the following:

def DisplayIt(request):
    somestring = ""
    for a in A.objects.filter(b__name__isnull=False):
        somestring += a.b.name
    for a in A.objects.filter(b__name__isnull=True):
        somestring += "dummy value for missing b.name"



Also, as a side note, don't do string concatenation that way -- it's horribly inefficient, since Python strings aren't mutable. The following is much better:

def DisplayIt(request):
    stringparts = []
    for a in A.objects.filter(b__name__isnull=False):
        stringparts.append(a.b.name)
    for a in A.objects.filter(b__name__isnull=True):
        stringparts.append("dummy value for missing b.name")
    ''.join(stringparts)



Second side note: The code above will perform a query to fetch a.b on each iteration of the for loop. That can be suuuuper slow. Consider using select_related to grab everything all in one go. Be wary, though - this can be slow too if your indexes aren't set up correctly. After enabling this I'd sniff the queries and spend some quality time with your query planner to make sure you're not doing any nasty non-indexed lookups.

Revised code:

def DisplayIt(request):
    stringparts = []
    for a in A.objects.filter(b__name__isnull=False).select_related():
        stringparts.append(a.b.name)
    for a in A.objects.filter(b__name__isnull=True).select_related():
        stringparts.append("dummy value for missing b.name")
    ''.join(stringparts)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the note about the string concats, I actually have a huge set of concats this way to build an html page, so I will see if I can change that to make it more efficient. As for the isnull, I actually need to have it return None or "" for a.b.name even if a.b is None. Do you know of a way to do that? –  Furbeenator Apr 10 '12 at 22:58
    
In database speak, you're saying that you want a query which, if given entity a of type A which contains a nullable foreign key b to entity type B, if a.b is NULL, then you want to replace, as part of the query, a.b with an "empty" mock of an entity of type B? Sorry - that's a horribly confusing sentence... –  Ben Burns Apr 10 '12 at 23:05
    
If what I just said is true, then no, there's no way to do that other than to check each A in the for loop. However if you can modify the insertion such that if b is missing for a given A, you point a.b at some dummy/empty B, then you're good to go. I believe you could do this simply by modifying A's default value for b, but it would require a migration to accomplish. –  Ben Burns Apr 10 '12 at 23:06
    
Shoot - I just thought of a piecewise way, but it's less elegant and uses two queries. Assuming order is not important, it'll work though. Editing answer now. –  Ben Burns Apr 10 '12 at 23:11
    
Thanks for your help, Ben. Since the queries are more complex than my simple example, I think that doing what you said in the answer with the if statement and appending a string array should be fine. I was just hoping Django might have a get_or_none for fields in addition to their models queryset get_or_none operation. –  Furbeenator Apr 10 '12 at 23:14

Building off your comment that says you want the instances of A that may or may not have a B. You can hack it to work, which is usually a terrible idea. Use the long-winded pythonic way that you want to avoid. But here is the bad way to do what you want:

a.__dict__.get('b',{'name':None}).name

This uses the fact that all attributes are stored in a dict object on the actual instance of the object. You use a standard dictionary accessor get() to return either b or a dictionary that contains an attribute that you're interested in. This is a terrible idea, but there it is.

Also, django/python is NOT old school PHP. I can't believe how many times I've seen this on stackoverflow in the last few weeks, but... DO NOT CONCATENATE STRINGS TO PRODUCE HTML!! That's what the Templating Language is for. Use it. Stop what you're doing RIGHT NOW. STOP IT STOP IT STOP IT. Use templates, do NOT try and write HTML in your views. It's a provable WRONG thing to do, so stop. Just stop.

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LOL, alright, I will look into doing it through templates. Thanks for the suggestions, and clever way to use the dictionay's .get() method to get None as default. I will not use that, but its good to see it. The reason I was putting html in my view is so I can easily call it from jQuery ajax and populate the page with the html code produced in my view. What is a better template way? Do you suggest creating a view that would pass a template for each ajax-driven section, and that would be returned to my xmlHttpRequest object and sent to the onpage section? –  Furbeenator Apr 10 '12 at 23:19
    
Absolutely. You can use your views to return partial templates for your javascript, or to return a full html page for your javascript. Either way. The templating language is for building strings to be returned for any request. –  Josh Smeaton Apr 10 '12 at 23:22
    
+1'd for the warning on not using templates... I got so into thinking about how to get the ORM to contort into what he wants that I totally missed that! –  Ben Burns Apr 10 '12 at 23:22
    
OK, it was a lot of work, but it was pretty cool to see some of the powerful tools Django templates offer. Please, just as reference, can you let me know if this seems acceptable: I was using Python to generate HTML so I could standardize an reuse a single method, preventing duplication of html inputs. I am now using template filters, passing them an object and field to display, they call render_to_string with some variables to set up text boxes, select boxes, checkboxes, etcetera from templates. Each template filter returns a template with the filled in variables. Is this acceptable practice? –  Furbeenator Apr 13 '12 at 16:35
    
@Furbeenator, can you write up a new question with how you've written up your template, asking if it's appropriate to do? Post the link as a comment here, and I'll have a look. It's hard to visualise what you've done without code. –  Josh Smeaton Apr 14 '12 at 2:41

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