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We have a simple, generic tables structure, implemented in PostgreSQL (8.3; 9.1 is at our horizon). It seems a very straightforward and common implementation. It boils down to this:

events_event_types
(
    # this table holds some 50 rows
    id bigserial # PK
    "name" character varying(255)
)

events_events
(
    # this table holds some 15M rows
    id bigserial # PK
    datetime timestamp with time zone
    eventtype_id bigint # FK to events_event_types.id
)

CREATE TABLE events_eventdetails
(
    # this table holds some 65M rows
    id bigserial # PK
    keyname character varying(255)
    "value" text
    event_id bigint # FK to events_events.id
)

Some of the rows in events_events and events_eventdetails tables would be like this:

events_events               | events_eventdetails
  id  datetime eventtype_id |   id   keyname       value        event_id
----------------------------|-------------------------------------------
  100 ...      10           |   1000 transactionId 9774ae16-... 100
                            |   1001 someKey       some value   100
  200 ...      20           |   2000 transactionId 9774ae16-... 200
                            |   2001 reductionId   123          200
                            |   2002 reductionId   456          200
  300 ...      30           |   3000 transactionId 9774ae16-... 300
                            |   2001 customerId    234          300
                            |   2001 companyId     345          300

We are in desperate need of a "solution" that returns events_events rows 100 and 200 and 300 together in a single result set and FAST! when asked for reductionId=123 or when asked for customerId=234 or when asked for companyId=345. (Possibly interested in an AND combination of these criteria, but that's not essentially the goal.) Not sure if it matters at this point, but the result set should be filterable on datetime range and eventtype_id (IN list) and be given a LIMIT.

I ask for a "solution", since this could be either:

  • A single query
  • Two smaller queries (as long as their intermediate result is always small enough. I followed this approach and got stuck for companies (companyId) with large amounts (~20k) of associated transactions (transactionId))
  • A subtle redesign (e.g. denormalization)

This is not a fresh question as we tried all three approaches over many months (won't bother you with those queries) but it all fails at performance. The solution should return in <<<1s. Previous attempts took approx. 10s at best.

I'd really appreciate some help -- I'm at a loss now...


The two smaller queries approach looks much like this:

Query 1:

SELECT Substring(details2_transvalue.VALUE, 0, 32)
    FROM events_eventdetails details2_transvalue
    JOIN events_eventdetails compdetails ON details2_transvalue.event_id = compdetails.event_id
    AND compdetails.keyname = 'companyId'
    AND Substring(compdetails.VALUE, 0, 32) = '4'
    AND details2_transvalue.keyname = 'transactionId'

Query 2:

SELECT events1.*
    FROM events_events events1
    JOIN events_eventdetails compDetails ON events1.id = compDetails.event_id
    AND compDetails.keyname='companyId'
    AND substring(compDetails.value,0,32)='4'
    WHERE events1.eventtype_id IN (...)
UNION
SELECT events2.*
    FROM events_events events2
    JOIN events_eventdetails details2_transKey ON events2.id = details2_transKey.event_id
    AND details2_transKey.keyname='transactionId'
    AND substring(details2_transKey.value,0,32) IN ( -- result of query 1 goes here -- )
    WHERE events2.eventtype_id IN (...)
    ORDER BY dateTime DESC LIMIT 50

Performance of this gets poor due to the large set returned by query 1.

As you can see, values in the events_eventdetails table are always expressed as length 32 substrings, which we have indexed as such. Further indices on keyname, event_id, event_id + keyname, keyname + length 32 substring.


Here is a PostgreSQL 9.1 approach -- even though I don't officially have that platform at my disposal:

WITH companyevents AS (
SELECT events1.*
FROM events_events events1
JOIN events_eventdetails compDetails
ON events1.id = compDetails.event_id
AND compDetails.keyname='companyId'
AND substring(compDetails.value,0,32)=' -- my desired companyId -- '
WHERE events1.eventtype_id in (...)
ORDER BY dateTime DESC
LIMIT 50
)
SELECT * from events_events
WHERE transaction_id IN (SELECT transaction_id FROM companyevents)
OR id IN (SELECT id FROM companyevents)
AND eventtype_id IN (...)
ORDER BY dateTime DESC
LIMIT 250;

The query plan is as follows for companyId with 28228 transactionIds:

 Limit  (cost=7545.99..7664.33 rows=250 width=130) (actual time=210.100..3026.267 rows=50 loops=1)
   CTE companyevents
     ->  Limit  (cost=7543.62..7543.74 rows=50 width=130) (actual time=206.994..207.020 rows=50 loops=1)
           ->  Sort  (cost=7543.62..7544.69 rows=429 width=130) (actual time=206.993..207.005 rows=50 loops=1)
                 Sort Key: events1.datetime
                 Sort Method: top-N heapsort  Memory: 23kB
                 ->  Nested Loop  (cost=10.02..7529.37 rows=429 width=130) (actual time=0.093..178.719 rows=28228 loops=1)
                       ->  Append  (cost=10.02..1140.62 rows=657 width=8) (actual time=0.082..27.594 rows=28228 loops=1)
                             ->  Bitmap Heap Scan on events_eventdetails compdetails  (cost=10.02..394.47 rows=97 width=8) (actual time=0.021..0.021 rows=0 loops=1)
                                   Recheck Cond: (((keyname)::text = 'companyId'::text) AND ("substring"(value, 0, 32) = '4'::text))
                                   ->  Bitmap Index Scan on events_eventdetails_substring_ind  (cost=0.00..10.00 rows=97 width=0) (actual time=0.019..0.019 rows=0 loops=1)
                                         Index Cond: (((keyname)::text = 'companyId'::text) AND ("substring"(value, 0, 32) = '4'::text))
                             ->  Index Scan using events_eventdetails_companyid_substring_ind on events_eventdetails_companyid compdetails  (cost=0.00..746.15 rows=560 width=8) (actual time=0.061..18.655 rows=28228 loops=1)
                                   Index Cond: (((keyname)::text = 'companyId'::text) AND ("substring"(value, 0, 32) = '4'::text))
                       ->  Index Scan using events_events_pkey on events_events events1  (cost=0.00..9.71 rows=1 width=130) (actual time=0.004..0.004 rows=1 loops=28228)
                             Index Cond: (id = compdetails.event_id)
                             Filter: (eventtype_id = ANY ('{103,106,107,110,45,34,14,87,58,78,7,76,42,11,25,57,98,37,30,35,33,49,52,29,74,28,85,59,51,65,66,18,13,86,75,6,44,38,43,94,56,95,96,71,50,81,90,89,16,17,4,88,79,77,68,97,92,67,72,53,2,10,31,32,80,111,104,93,26,8,61,5,73,70,63,20,60,40,41,23,22,48,36,108,99,64,62,55,69,19,46,47,15,54,100,101,27,21,12,102,105,109,112,113,114,115,116,119,120,121,122,123,124,9,127,24,130,132,129,125,131,118,117,133,134}'::bigint[]))
   ->  Index Scan Backward using events_events_datetime_ind on events_events  (cost=2.25..1337132.75 rows=2824764 width=130) (actual time=210.100..3026.255 rows=50 loops=1)
         Filter: ((hashed SubPlan 2) OR ((hashed SubPlan 3) AND (eventtype_id = ANY ('{103,106,107,110,45,34,14,87,58,78,7,76,42,11,25,57,98,37,30,35,33,49,52,29,74,28,85,59,51,65,66,18,13,86,75,6,44,38,43,94,56,95,96,71,50,81,90,89,16,17,4,88,79,77,68,97,92,67,72,53,2,10,31,32,80,111,104,93,26,8,61,5,73,70,63,20,60,40,41,23,22,48,36,108,99,64,62,55,69,19,46,47,15,54,100,101,27,21,12,102,105,109,112,113,114,115,116,119,120,121,122,123,124,9,127,24,130,132,129,125,131,118,117,133,134}'::bigint[]))))
         SubPlan 2
           ->  CTE Scan on companyevents  (cost=0.00..1.00 rows=50 width=90) (actual time=206.998..207.071 rows=50 loops=1)
         SubPlan 3
           ->  CTE Scan on companyevents  (cost=0.00..1.00 rows=50 width=8) (actual time=0.001..0.026 rows=50 loops=1)
 Total runtime: 3026.410 ms

The query plan is as follows for companyId with 288 transactionIds:

 Limit  (cost=7545.99..7664.33 rows=250 width=130) (actual time=30.976..3790.362 rows=54 loops=1)
   CTE companyevents
     ->  Limit  (cost=7543.62..7543.74 rows=50 width=130) (actual time=9.263..9.290 rows=50 loops=1)
           ->  Sort  (cost=7543.62..7544.69 rows=429 width=130) (actual time=9.263..9.272 rows=50 loops=1)
                 Sort Key: events1.datetime
                 Sort Method: top-N heapsort  Memory: 24kB
                 ->  Nested Loop  (cost=10.02..7529.37 rows=429 width=130) (actual time=0.071..8.195 rows=1025 loops=1)
                       ->  Append  (cost=10.02..1140.62 rows=657 width=8) (actual time=0.060..1.348 rows=1025 loops=1)
                             ->  Bitmap Heap Scan on events_eventdetails compdetails  (cost=10.02..394.47 rows=97 width=8) (actual time=0.021..0.021 rows=0 loops=1)
                                   Recheck Cond: (((keyname)::text = 'companyId'::text) AND ("substring"(value, 0, 32) = '5'::text))
                                   ->  Bitmap Index Scan on events_eventdetails_substring_ind  (cost=0.00..10.00 rows=97 width=0) (actual time=0.019..0.019 rows=0 loops=1)
                                         Index Cond: (((keyname)::text = 'companyId'::text) AND ("substring"(value, 0, 32) = '5'::text))
                             ->  Index Scan using events_eventdetails_companyid_substring_ind on events_eventdetails_companyid compdetails  (cost=0.00..746.15 rows=560 width=8) (actual time=0.039..1.006 rows=1025 loops=1)
                                   Index Cond: (((keyname)::text = 'companyId'::text) AND ("substring"(value, 0, 32) = '5'::text))
                       ->  Index Scan using events_events_pkey on events_events events1  (cost=0.00..9.71 rows=1 width=130) (actual time=0.005..0.006 rows=1 loops=1025)
                             Index Cond: (id = compdetails.event_id)
                             Filter: (eventtype_id = ANY ('{103,106,107,110,45,34,14,87,58,78,7,76,42,11,25,57,98,37,30,35,33,49,52,29,74,28,85,59,51,65,66,18,13,86,75,6,44,38,43,94,56,95,96,71,50,81,90,89,16,17,4,88,79,77,68,97,92,67,72,53,2,10,31,32,80,111,104,93,26,8,61,5,73,70,63,20,60,40,41,23,22,48,36,108,99,64,62,55,69,19,46,47,15,54,100,101,27,21,12,102,105,109,112,113,114,115,116,119,120,121,122,123,124,9,127,24,130,132,129,125,131,118,117,133,134}'::bigint[]))
   ->  Index Scan Backward using events_events_datetime_ind on events_events  (cost=2.25..1337132.75 rows=2824764 width=130) (actual time=30.975..3790.332 rows=54 loops=1)
         Filter: ((hashed SubPlan 2) OR ((hashed SubPlan 3) AND (eventtype_id = ANY ('{103,106,107,110,45,34,14,87,58,78,7,76,42,11,25,57,98,37,30,35,33,49,52,29,74,28,85,59,51,65,66,18,13,86,75,6,44,38,43,94,56,95,96,71,50,81,90,89,16,17,4,88,79,77,68,97,92,67,72,53,2,10,31,32,80,111,104,93,26,8,61,5,73,70,63,20,60,40,41,23,22,48,36,108,99,64,62,55,69,19,46,47,15,54,100,101,27,21,12,102,105,109,112,113,114,115,116,119,120,121,122,123,124,9,127,24,130,132,129,125,131,118,117,133,134}'::bigint[]))))
         SubPlan 2
           ->  CTE Scan on companyevents  (cost=0.00..1.00 rows=50 width=90) (actual time=9.266..9.327 rows=50 loops=1)
         SubPlan 3
           ->  CTE Scan on companyevents  (cost=0.00..1.00 rows=50 width=8) (actual time=0.001..0.019 rows=50 loops=1)
 Total runtime: 3796.736 ms

With 3s/4s this is not bad at all, but still a factor 100+ too slow. Also, this wasn't on relevant hardware. Nonetheless it should show where the pain is.


Here is something that could possibly grow into a solution:

Added a table:

events_transaction_helper
(
    event_id bigint not null
    transactionid character varying(36) not null
    keyname character varying(255) not null
    value bigint not null
    # index on keyname, value
)

I "manually" filled this table now, but a materialized view implementation would do the trick. It would much follow the below query:

SELECT tr.event_id, tr.value AS transactionid, det.keyname, det.value AS value
   FROM events_eventdetails tr
   JOIN events_eventdetails det ON det.event_id = tr.event_id
  WHERE tr.keyname = 'transactionId'
     AND det.keyname
     IN ('companyId', 'reduction_id', 'customer_id');

Added a column to the events_events table:

transaction_id character varying(36) null

This new column is filled as follows:

update events_events
set transaction_id =
    (select value from events_eventdetails
        where keyname='transactionId'
        and event_id=events_events.id);

Now, the following query returns in <15ms consistently:

explain analyze select * from events_events
    where transactionId in
    (select distinct transactionid
        from events_transaction_helper
        WHERE keyname='companyId' and value=5)
    and eventtype_id in (...)
    order by datetime desc limit 250;

 Limit  (cost=5075.23..5075.85 rows=250 width=130) (actual time=8.901..9.028 rows=250 loops=1)
   ->  Sort  (cost=5075.23..5077.19 rows=785 width=130) (actual time=8.900..8.953 rows=250 loops=1)
         Sort Key: events_events.datetime
         Sort Method: top-N heapsort  Memory: 81kB
         ->  Nested Loop  (cost=57.95..5040.04 rows=785 width=130) (actual time=0.928..8.268 rows=524 loops=1)
               ->  HashAggregate  (cost=52.30..52.42 rows=12 width=37) (actual time=0.895..0.991 rows=276 loops=1)
                     ->  Subquery Scan on "ANY_subquery"  (cost=52.03..52.27 rows=12 width=37) (actual time=0.558..0.757 rows=276 loops=1)
                           ->  HashAggregate  (cost=52.03..52.15 rows=12 width=37) (actual time=0.556..0.638 rows=276 loops=1)
                                 ->  Index Scan using testmaterializedviewkeynamevalue on events_transaction_helper  (cost=0.00..51.98 rows=22 width=37) (actual time=0.068..0.404 rows=288 loops=1)
                                       Index Cond: (((keyname)::text = 'companyId'::text) AND (value = 5))
               ->  Bitmap Heap Scan on events_events  (cost=5.65..414.38 rows=100 width=130) (actual time=0.023..0.024 rows=2 loops=276)
                     Recheck Cond: ((transactionid)::text = ("ANY_subquery".transactionid)::text)
                     Filter: (eventtype_id = ANY ('{103,106,107,110,45,34,14,87,58,78,7,76,42,11,25,57,98,37,30,35,33,49,52,29,74,28,85,59,51,65,66,18,13,86,75,6,44,38,43,94,56,95,96,71,50,81,90,89,16,17,4,88,79,77,68,97,92,67,72,53,2,10,31,32,80,111,104,93,26,8,61,5,73,70,63,20,60,40,41,23,22,48,36,108,99,64,62,55,69,19,46,47,15,54,100,101,27,21,12,102,105,109,112,113,114,115,116,119,120,121,122,123,124,9,127,24,130,132,129,125,131,118,117,133,134}'::bigint[]))
                     ->  Bitmap Index Scan on testtransactionid  (cost=0.00..5.63 rows=100 width=0) (actual time=0.020..0.020 rows=2 loops=276)
                           Index Cond: ((transactionid)::text = ("ANY_subquery".transactionid)::text)
 Total runtime: 9.122 ms

I'll check back later to let you know if this turned out a feasible solution for real :)

share|improve this question
    
Please do bother use with those queries so we know what you've already tried. –  Ben Lee Apr 10 '12 at 23:17
    
so your criteria in event details are varchar 255 and a text field? You should pat yourself on the back for getting it down to 10 seconds. Event_Keys table int and varchar to normalise them and an index would be a start, the text field is a problem though... –  Tony Hopkinson Apr 10 '12 at 23:23
    
@Ben: Posting these queries would make my comment two long. Not sure how to go around that. –  Sander Verhagen Apr 10 '12 at 23:52
    
@Tony: I agree that this kind of data typing is not ideal for these queries, but for simpler queries PostgreSQL does not seem to mind. For instance 3ms for: select * from events_events, events_eventdetails where keyname='companyId' and substring(value,0,32)=' -- some company that has 20k events -- ' and event_id = events_events.id limit 50; –  Sander Verhagen Apr 10 '12 at 23:53
    
@SanderVerhagen, you can always edit your question ("edit" link under your post). –  Ben Lee Apr 10 '12 at 23:56

3 Answers 3

The Idea is not to denormalise, but to normalise. The events_details() table can be replaced by two tables: one with the event_detail_types, and one with the actual values (referring to the {even_id,detail_types}. This will make the execution of the query easier, since only the numerical ids of the detail_types have to be extracted and selected. The gain is in the reduced number of pages that has to be fetched by the DBMS, since all the key name need only be stored+retrieved+compared once.

NOTE: I changed the naming a bit. For reasons of sanity and safety, mostly.

SET search_path='cav';
/**** ***/
DROP SCHEMA cav CASCADE;
CREATE SCHEMA cav;
SET search_path='cav';

CREATE TABLE event_types
(
    -- this table holds some 50 rows
    id bigserial PRIMARY KEY
    , zname varchar(255)
);
INSERT INTO event_types(zname)
SELECT 'event_'::text || gs::text
FROM generate_series (1,100) gs
        ;

CREATE TABLE events
(
    -- this table holds some 15M rows
    id bigserial PRIMARY KEY
    , zdatetime timestamp with time zone
    , eventtype_id bigint REFERENCES event_types(id)
);
INSERT INTO events(zdatetime,eventtype_id)
SELECT gs, et.id
FROM generate_series ('2012-04-11 00:00:00'::timestamp
                     , '2012-04-12 12:00:00'::timestamp  ,' 1 hour'::interval ) gs
        , event_types et
        ;

-- SELECT * FROM event_types;
-- SELECT * FROM events;

CREATE TABLE event_details
(
    -- this table holds some 65M rows
    id bigserial PRIMARY KEY
    , event_id bigint REFERENCES events(id)
    , keyname varchar(255)
    , zvalue text
);

INSERT INTO event_details(event_id, keyname)
SELECT ev.id,im.*
FROM events ev
        , (VALUES ('transactionId'::text),('someKey'::text)
           ,('reductionId'::text),('customerId'::text),('companyId'::text)
          ) im
        ;
UPDATE event_details
SET zvalue = 'Some_value'::text || (random() * 1000)::int::text
        ;
        --
        -- Domain table with all valid detail_types
        --
CREATE TABLE detail_types(
        id bigserial PRIMARY KEY
        , keyname varchar(255)
        );
INSERT INTO detail_types(keyname)
SELECT DISTINCT keyname
        FROM event_details
        ;

        --
        -- Context-attribute-value table, referencing {event_id, type_id}
        --
CREATE TABLE event_detail_values
        ( event_id BIGINT
        , detail_type_id BIGINT
        , zvalue text
        , PRIMARY KEY(event_id , detail_type_id)
        , FOREIGN KEY(event_id ) REFERENCES events(id)
        , FOREIGN KEY(detail_type_id)REFERENCES detail_types(id)
        );

        --
        -- For the sake of joining we create some natural keys
        --
CREATE INDEX events_details_keyname ON event_details (keyname) ;
CREATE INDEX detail_types_keyname ON detail_types(keyname) ;

INSERT INTO event_detail_values (event_id,detail_type_id, zvalue)
        SELECT ed.event_id, dt.id
                , ed.zvalue
        FROM event_details ed
        , detail_types dt
        WHERE ed.keyname = dt.keyname
        ;
        --
        -- Now we can drop the original table, and use the view instead
        --
DROP TABLE event_details;
CREATE VIEW event_details AS (
        SELECT dv.event_id AS event_id
                , dt.keyname AS keyname
                , dv.zvalue AS zvalue
        FROM event_detail_values dv
        JOIN detail_types dt ON dt.id = dv.detail_type_id
        );
EXPLAIN ANALYZE
SELECT ev.id AS event_id
        , ev.zdatetime AS zdatetime
        , ed.keyname AS keyname
        , ed.zvalue AS zevalue
        FROM events ev
        JOIN event_details ed ON ed.event_id = ev.id
        WHERE ed.keyname IN ('transactionId','customerId','companyId')
        ORDER BY event_id,keyname
        ;

resulting Query plan:

                                                                 QUERY PLAN                                                                  
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Sort  (cost=1178.79..1197.29 rows=7400 width=40) (actual time=159.902..177.379 rows=11100 loops=1)
   Sort Key: ev.id, dt.keyname
   Sort Method: external sort  Disk: 560kB
   ->  Hash Join  (cost=108.34..703.22 rows=7400 width=40) (actual time=12.225..122.231 rows=11100 loops=1)
         Hash Cond: (dv.event_id = ev.id)
         ->  Hash Join  (cost=1.09..466.47 rows=7400 width=32) (actual time=0.047..74.183 rows=11100 loops=1)
               Hash Cond: (dv.detail_type_id = dt.id)
               ->  Seq Scan on event_detail_values dv  (cost=0.00..322.00 rows=18500 width=29) (actual time=0.006..26.543 rows=18500 loops=1)
               ->  Hash  (cost=1.07..1.07 rows=2 width=19) (actual time=0.025..0.025 rows=3 loops=1)
                     Buckets: 1024  Batches: 1  Memory Usage: 1kB
                     ->  Seq Scan on detail_types dt  (cost=0.00..1.07 rows=2 width=19) (actual time=0.009..0.014 rows=3 loops=1)
                           Filter: ((keyname)::text = ANY ('{transactionId,customerId,companyId}'::text[]))
         ->  Hash  (cost=61.00..61.00 rows=3700 width=16) (actual time=12.161..12.161 rows=3700 loops=1)
               Buckets: 1024  Batches: 1  Memory Usage: 131kB
               ->  Seq Scan on events ev  (cost=0.00..61.00 rows=3700 width=16) (actual time=0.004..5.926 rows=3700 loops=1)
 Total runtime: 192.724 ms
 (16 rows)

As you can see, the "deepest" part of the query is the retrieval of the detail_type_ids, given the list of strings. This is put into a hash table, which is then combined with a corresponding hashset for the detail_values. (NB: this is pg-9.1)

YMMV.

share|improve this answer

If you must use a design along these lines, you should eliminate the id column from events_eventdetails and declare the primary key to be (event_id, keyname). That would give you a very useful index without also maintaining a useless index for the synthetic key.

A step better would be to eliminate the events_eventdetails table entirely and use an hstore column for that data, with a GIN index. That would probably get you to your performance goals without needing to pre-define what event details are stored.

Even better, if you can predict or specify what event details are possible, would be to not try to implement a database within a database. Make each "keyname" value into a column in events_eventdetails with a data type appropriate to the nature of that data. This will probably allow much faster access at the cost of needing to issue ALTER TABLE statements as the nature of the detail changes.

share|improve this answer
    
For the purpose of keeping the scope of the question limited, you may appreciate that I simplified my description of what we implemented so far. Since the events_eventdetails table is in fact not just keyname/value, rather keyname/index/value, and thus allows multiple duplicate keys per event, this may not work. Though the hstore sounds like a great solution for pure key/value pairs. So much to learn still in PostgreSQL! –  Sander Verhagen Apr 11 '12 at 0:05
    
I'm not clear on what you mean by keyname/index/value. Could you clarify? It's hard to suggest a solution without knowing more about the actual problem. –  kgrittn Apr 11 '12 at 2:47
    
After having key/value pairs for a while, we came across a need for ordered duplicate keys, and modeled that using a listindex column (integer) of the events_eventdetails table, in addition to the keyname and value columns (the original key/value pair). –  Sander Verhagen Apr 11 '12 at 18:49
    
Well, I suppose you could wait for version 9.2, which will support JSON columns, but I really think you would be better of using a schema in 3rd normal form. You really are writing a DBMS in a DBMS, and that extra level of indirection will tend to hurt you on performance rather badly. –  kgrittn Apr 11 '12 at 19:41

See, if your key (reductionId in this case) is met in more then 7-10% of all the rows in the events_eventdetails table, then PostgreSQL will prefer a SeqScan. There's nothing you can do, it is the fastest way.

I have had a similar case working with ISO8583 packets. Each packet consists of 128 fields (by design), so first database design followed your approach with 2 tables:

  • field_id and description in one table (events_events in your case),
  • field_id + field_value in another (events_eventdetails).

Although such layout follows the 3NF, we hit same issues straight away:

  • bad performance,
  • highly complicated queries.

In your case you should go for re-design. One option (easier one) is to make events_eventdetails.keyname being a smallint, which will make comparison operations faster. Not a big win though.

Another option is to reduce 2 tables into a single one, something like:

CREATE TABLE events_events (
    id            bigserial,
    datetime      timestamp with time zone,
    eventtype_id  bigint,
    transactionId text,   -- value for transactionId 
    reductionId   text,   --   -"-     reductionId
    companyId     text,   -- etc.
    customerId    text,
    anyotherId    text,
    ...
);

This will break the 3NF, but on the other hand:

  • you have more freedom to index your data;
  • your queries will be shorter and easier to maintain;
  • performance will be way too better.

Possible drawbacks:

  • you will waste a bit more space for the unused fields: unused fields / 8 bytes per row
  • you might still need an extra table for the events that are too rear to keep a separate column for.

EDIT:

I don't quite understand what you mean by materialize here.

In your question you mentioned you want:

"solution" that returns events_events rows 100 and 200 and 300 together in a single result set and FAST! when asked for reductionId=123 or when asked for customerId=234 or when asked for companyId=345.

The suggested redesign creates a crosstab or pivot table from your events_eventdetails. And to get all events_events rows that satisfies your conditions you can use:

SELECT *
  FROM events_events
 WHERE id IN (100, 200, 300)
   AND reductionId = 123
-- AND customerId = 234
-- AND companyId = 345;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that. I don't yet see how it solves the essense of the problem that you first have to materialize events that match the real WHERE criteria before you can query for the events that have the same transactionIds as those in that former materialized result set. –  Sander Verhagen Apr 11 '12 at 15:11
    
With any query design so far, I seem to have a part of the query that essentially returns all rows that match the basic WHERE (e.g. companyId=345). That subset can be large (~20k), since yet ORDER and LIMIT cannot be applied (it seems). Choose companyId=x for a company that returns a small subset, and it drastically improves query speed. I referred to this intermediate subset as being "materialized" (perhaps that's an incorrect or confusing description). –  Sander Verhagen Apr 12 '12 at 17:20
    
Even denormalized transactionId/companyId leads to that intermediate large subset. If you are suggesting to also update companyId and such denormalized columns in rows that would be indirectly queried (by transactionId), so that I'd not longer be querying on the transactionId indirection, that won't work: such indirectly queried row may already have a (different) companyId -and- keys are not unique (I've updated my original post to show that, see reductionId). –  Sander Verhagen Apr 12 '12 at 17:22
    
This is natural, that performance on small subsets will be significantly better. If your query is planned to return more then 10% of the total rows, then SeqScan will be chosen. If it's an issue, consider reorganizing table's physical storage. First thing that comes to my mind is partitioning. –  vyegorov Apr 12 '12 at 17:27
    
Actually, our event details are partitioned on keyname. That means, we have some 70 partitions for the most-common event details, the remainder goes in the "parent" table. I was actually reluctant to say "large", since 20k is not that much on 15M events and 65M event details. And maybe I'm wrong too about how much this result set affects the performance. I'll post some results in the original question in a minute. –  Sander Verhagen Apr 12 '12 at 17:40

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