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I am experimenting with a network application (WCF NetTcpBinding) that runs periodically and downloads a large amount of data (just text) from a remote server. The application runs inside a Windows service using a System.Threading.Timer:

    protected override void OnStart(string[] args)
    {
        int interval = // get interval from some config file 
        timer = new Timer(new TimerCallback(x => DoWork()), null, 0, interval);
    }

What I am observing is that when a large amount of data is being downloaded, the service process consumes ~ 300,000 kb of working set memory or so (which is expected given the amount of data). After the operation is complete, however, the process stays at around ~ 300,000 kb, which according to the CLR profiler I ran is stack memory though I am not 100% sure of this.

Once the service comes around for another batch of downloading after the interval of X minutes, the process drops back down to a lower memory usage of about ~ 15,000 kb then promptly rises up again only if there is alot more data to download. However if there is very little to no data to be downloaded, the process continues to hang at around ~ 300,000 kb.

Would it make sense to use GC.Collect in this situation after each interval is complete (the operations at each interval are completely independent of eachother), or should the GC do this on its own? It seems to me that the GC waits until alot more memory is needed for a new batch of processing before it clears out memory left over from an older batch -- not a memory leak per se but the GC is waiting longer than it should. I am curious whether this is by design or there is likely something in my code that is causing this behavior? Also, if it is in fact stack memory I was under the impression that the GC isn't really involved. However I tested the following code and it does seem to clear out the memory promptly:

        GC.Collect(GC.MaxGeneration, GCCollectionMode.Forced); 
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3  
It's very unlikely that the memory is being consumed on the stack. Further, it doesn't sound like you actually have a problem; the program sounds pretty well-behaved. –  dlev Apr 10 '12 at 23:52
    
@dlev, Thats possible -- so is it by design that the GC doesn't clean up unless alot more data must be loaded into memory? Ie. from my second paragraph -- "the process drops back down to a lower memory usage of about ~ 15,000 kb then promptly rises up again only if there is alot more data to download. However if there is very little to no data to be downloaded, the process continues to hang at around ~ 300,000 kb." –  Sean Thoman Apr 11 '12 at 0:01
1  
For sure. The GC will reclaim memory if it feels it's necessary. If not, it'll just leave well enough alone, and not waste your process's time by running a collection. –  dlev Apr 11 '12 at 0:02
1  
The GC will clear up old memory when it runs a collection. One thing that triggers that is needing a lot of new memory. That said there are other things that can trigger a collection (i.e. a user calling GC.Collect.) So, in a word, "yes" although it's not really that simple. People can (and have) written entire books on the subject. –  Servy Apr 11 '12 at 0:03
    
Makes sense. Would it be correct to say that, in general, potential code mistakes related to memory (even though they are harder to make in a garbage collected language) are more likely to prevent a collection from collecting objects that should be collected, as opposed to delaying or preventing the collection itself? In other words, a collection will always be attempted eventually, regardless of potential code mistakes. –  Sean Thoman Apr 11 '12 at 0:09

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