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I am trying to create a tree like node diagram, like the example image here. I have the following code:

    private void DrawNode(Graphics g, Node<T> node, float xOffset, float yOffset)
    {
        if (node == null)
        {
            return;
        }

        Bitmap bmp = (from b in _nodeBitmaps where b.Node.Value.Equals(node.Value) select b.Bitmap).FirstOrDefault();

        if (bmp != null)
        {
            g.DrawImage(bmp, xOffset, yOffset);

            DrawNode(g, node.LeftNode, xOffset - 30 , yOffset + 20);
            DrawNode(g, node.RightNode, xOffset + 30, yOffset + 20);
        }
    }

My code is almost working. The problem I'm having is that some of the nodes are overlapping. In the picture above, nodes 25 and 66 are overlapping. The reason, I'm sure, is because its mathematically laying the left nodes and right nodes equal space, so the parent's right node overlaps with the adjacent parent's left node. How can I fix this problem?

UPDATE:

This is the code update I made after dtb's suggestion:

            int nodeWidth = 0;
            int rightChildWidth = 0;

            if (node.IsLeafNode)
            {
                nodeWidth = bmp.Width + 50;
            }
            else
            {
                int leftChildWidth = 0;

                Bitmap bmpLeft = null;
                Bitmap bmpRight = null;

                if (node.LeftNode != null)
                {
                    bmpLeft =
                        (from b in _nodeBitmaps where b.Node.Value.Equals(node.LeftNode.Value) select b.Bitmap).
                            FirstOrDefault();
                    if (bmpLeft != null)
                        leftChildWidth = bmpLeft.Width;
                }
                if (node.RightNode != null)
                {
                    bmpRight =
                        (from b in _nodeBitmaps where b.Node.Value.Equals(node.RightNode.Value) select b.Bitmap).
                            FirstOrDefault();
                    if (bmpRight != null)
                        rightChildWidth = bmpRight.Width;
                }

                nodeWidth = leftChildWidth + 50 + rightChildWidth;
            }


            g.DrawImage(bmp, xOffset + (nodeWidth - bmp.Width) / 2, yOffset);

            if (node.LeftNode != null)
            {
                DrawNode(g, node.LeftNode, xOffset, yOffset + 20);
            }
            if (node.RightNode != null)
            {
                DrawNode(g, node.RightNode, xOffset + nodeWidth - rightChildWidth, yOffset + 20);
            }

Here is a screenshot from this code: Screen Shot

share|improve this question
1  
Not sure how we would know how to fix the problem, since you can handle it any way you want: Shrink the nodes! Shift the parents! Allow the overlap! Just decide on a strategy, calculate when that strategy will be needed, and implement it. –  dlev Apr 10 '12 at 23:56
    
@dlev -- its not that easy. If I shift the parents, the same problem happens to the children (who are also parents) below it. Shrinking the nodes also doesn't help...that just shrinks them, but still overlaps them. Its got to be some kind of mathematical solution –  Icemanind Apr 10 '12 at 23:58
    
I don't mean to be flip: I glossed over the "calculate when that strategy will be needed", but that is indeed the crux of this issue. Tough to say more without knowing exactly how you want to lay everything out. –  dlev Apr 11 '12 at 0:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Assign a width to each node:

  • the width of a leaf is the width of the image, w.
  • the width of a node is the width of its left child node + a constant d + the width of the right child node.

       Illustration

void CalculateWidth(Node<T> node)
{
    node.Width = 20;
    if (node.Left != null)
    {
        CalculateWidth(node.Left);
        node.Width += node.Left.Width;
    }
    if (node.Right != null)
    {
        CalculateWidth(node.Right);
        node.Width += node.Right.Width;
    }
    if (node.Width < bmp.Width)
    {
        node.Width = bmp.Width;
    }
}

Starting with the root node and x = 0, draw the image at the halve of the width, offset by x.
Then calculate the x position for each child node and recurse:

void DrawNode(Graphics g, Node<T> node, double x, double y)
{
    g.DrawImage(x + (node.Width - bmp.Width) / 2, y, bmp);

    if (node.Left != null)
    {
        DrawNode(g, node.Left, x, y + 20);
    }
    if (node.Right != null)
    {
        DrawNode(g, node.Right, x + node.Width - node.Right.Width, y + 20);
    }
}

Usage:

CalculateWidth(root);

DrawNode(g, root, 0, 0);
share|improve this answer
    
I tried this and it doesn't seem to be working right. For example, when rendered to the screen, Node 5 is right under Node 20, just to the left. That's fine. But Node 25 is pushed off to the right. Nodes 75 and 95 are also overlapping. I can post the code if that'll help. –  Icemanind Apr 11 '12 at 3:06
    
Yes, please post the code. And also include a screenshot. –  dtb Apr 11 '12 at 3:21
    
Okay, I just updated my question. I included the changes I made to the code and a screen shot. –  Icemanind Apr 11 '12 at 3:44
    
You are aware that, before you can calculate the width of 50, you first need to calculate the width of 20 and 75, right? –  dtb Apr 11 '12 at 3:47
    
Yes, I am doing that. Look at the leftChildWidth and rightChildWidth calculations in the code I posted –  Icemanind Apr 11 '12 at 3:53

You're right that they're going to overlap. It's because you're adding/subtracting a fixed value to xOffset as you traverse down the tree. In the example picture, it's not actually a fixed offset: rather, it's logarithmic exponential with respect to its vertical position. The further down you go, the smaller the offset should be.

Replace the 30s with A * Math.Log(yOffset), where A is some scaling value that you'll have to tweak until it looks right.

EDIT: or is it exponential? I can't visualize this stuff too well. You might end up wanting A * Math.Exp(-B * yOffset) instead. (The negative is significant: this means it'll get smaller with larger yOffset, which is what you want.)

A will be like your master, linear scaling factor, while B will control how quickly the offset gets smaller.

double A = some_number;
double B = some_other_number;
int offset = (int)(A * Math.Exp(-B * yOffset));
DrawNode(g, node.LeftNode, xOffset - offset , yOffset + 20);
DrawNode(g, node.RightNode, xOffset + offset, yOffset + 20);

Update:

double A = 75f;
double B = 0.05f;
int offset = (int)(A * Math.Exp(-B * (yOffset - 10)));
DrawNode(g, node.LeftNode, xOffset - offset, yOffset + 20);
DrawNode(g, node.RightNode, xOffset + offset, yOffset + 20);

Called with:

DrawNode(e.Graphics, head, this.ClientSize.Width / 2, 10f);

The - 10 in the Exp is significant: it is the initial yOffset of the head. It produces the following:

If you want precise margin/padding control then by all means go with dtb's method, but I think 3 extra lines with a single formula is as elegant a mathematical solution as you're going to get.

Update 2:

One more thing I forgot: I'm using base e = 2.7183, but you'd want something closer to 2. Logically you would use exactly 2, but because the nodes have non-zero widths you might want something a bit bigger, like 2.1. You can change the base by multiplying B by Math.Log(new_base):

double B = 0.05f * Math.Log(2.1);

I should also explain how I got the value of 0.05f. Basically, you're increasing yOffset by 20 for each level of the tree. If I subtract the initial yOffset of the head (which is 10 in my case), then my first few yOffsets are 0, 20, 40, 60, etc. I want the x offset to be cut in half for each row; that is,

2 ^ (-0B) = 1
2 ^ (-20B) = 0.5
2 ^ (-40B) = 0.25

Obviously, B needs to be 1/20, or 0.05. I get the Math.Log(2.1) value from the relation:

base ^ exponent == e ^ (ln(base) * exponent)

So, with base 2.1, it looks like this:

share|improve this answer
    
Won't it need to be Log base 2, not 10? –  Servy Apr 11 '12 at 0:06
    
I saw it wrong in my head, it's actually exponential (with a negative exponent). Log10 and Log2 are asymptotically the same -- that is, Log10 x = C * Log2 x, for some constant C. –  Jeff E Apr 11 '12 at 0:07
    
You are right, it's a negative exponent. As for the log base, It's true that there is a constant difference, but that constant will be log base 10 of 2 (in your example). Since there will be at least one additional constant for scaling (the width of the total space) it's clearer in my mind to separate out each constant rather than rolling them up all into one big 'C' without defining it. –  Servy Apr 11 '12 at 0:17
    
Jeff, this solution doesn't seem to work, as it seems to spread out the to row fine, but then all the rows below it line up exactly under each other. –  Icemanind Apr 11 '12 at 1:03
    
I forget to mention that precise care needs to be taken in calculating B. I tried implementing it when I got home and I get something like this, the answer is updated: i.imgur.com/hfedP.png –  Jeff E Apr 11 '12 at 6:52

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