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I'm looking to create a form where pressing the enter key causes focus to go to the "next" form element on the page. The solution I keep finding on the web is...

 <body onkeydown="if(event.keyCode==13){event.keyCode=9; return event.keyCode}">

Unfortunately, that only seems to work in IE. So the real meat of this question is if anybody knows of a solution that works for FF and Chrome? Additionally, I'd rather not have to add onkeydown events to the form elements themselves, but if that's the only way, it will have to do.

This issue is similar to question 905222, but deserving of it's own question in my opinion.

Edit: also, I've seen people bring up the issue that this isn't good style, as it diverges from form behavior that users are used to. I agree! It's a client request :(

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11 Answers 11

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could programatically iterate the form elements adding the onkeydown handler as you go. This way you can reuse the code.

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This is what I ended up doing. Thanks! –  Ross Jun 18 '09 at 16:44
3  
-1 because this answer does not answer the question –  tetri Jan 17 at 16:22

I used the logic suggested by Andrew which is very effective. And this is my version:

$('body').on('keydown', 'input, select, textarea', function(e) {
    var self = $(this)
      , form = self.parents('form:eq(0)')
      , focusable
      , next
      ;
    if (e.keyCode == 13) {
        focusable = form.find('input,a,select,button,textarea').filter(':visible');
        next = focusable.eq(focusable.index(this)+1);
        if (next.length) {
            next.focus();
        } else {
            form.submit();
        }
        return false;
    }
});
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It looks like this also uses jQuery, is that correct? –  k-den Jan 22 '13 at 18:14
1  
@k-den Yes it does –  Mathieu Mar 14 '13 at 17:46
9  
I suggest removing textarea from the selector in the first line. In a textarea, you want to be able to start a new line using the enter key. –  aimfeld Jun 13 '13 at 10:48

Thank you for the good script.

I have just added the shift event on the above function to go back between elements, I thought someone may need this.

$('body').on('keydown', 'input, select, textarea', function(e) {
var self = $(this)
  , form = self.parents('form:eq(0)')
  , focusable
  , next
  , prev
  ;

if (e.shiftKey) {
 if (e.keyCode == 13) {
     focusable =   form.find('input,a,select,button,textarea').filter(':visible');
     prev = focusable.eq(focusable.index(this)-1); 

     if (prev.length) {
        prev.focus();
     } else {
        form.submit();
    }
  }
}
  else
if (e.keyCode == 13) {
    focusable = form.find('input,a,select,button,textarea').filter(':visible');
    next = focusable.eq(focusable.index(this)+1);
    if (next.length) {
        next.focus();
    } else {
        form.submit();
    }
    return false;
}
});
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I had a simular need. Here is what I did:

  <script type="text/javascript" language="javascript">
    function convertEnterToTab() {
      if(event.keyCode==13) {
        event.keyCode = 9;
      }
    }
    document.onkeydown = convertEnterToTab;    
  </script>
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IE only........ –  mplungjan Apr 16 '13 at 13:47
    
not working in CHome.. –  HD.. Mar 7 at 14:56

Changing this behaviour actually creates a far better user experience than the default behaviour implemented natively. Consider that the behaviour of the enter key is already inconsistent from the user's point of view, because in a single line input, enter tends to submit a form, while in a multi-line textarea, it simply adds a newline to the contents of the field.

I recently did it like this (uses jQuery):

$('input.enterastab, select.enterastab, textarea.enterastab').live('keydown', function(e) {
 if (e.keyCode==13) {
  var focusable = $('input,a,select,button,textarea').filter(':visible');
  focusable.eq(focusable.index(this)+1).focus();
  return false;
 }
});

This is not terribly efficient, but works well enough and is reliable - just add the 'enterastab' class to any input element that should behave in this way.

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1  
Short and concise! Started off with something similar as well, but now I've expanded on it - see my answer (on this page) with PlusAsTab. –  Joel Purra Feb 17 '12 at 12:21

I reworked the OPs solution into a Knockout binding and thought I'd share it. Thanks very much :-)

Here's a Fiddle

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" >
<head>
    <script src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.9.1/jquery.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
    <script src="http://ajax.aspnetcdn.com/ajax/knockout/knockout-2.2.1.js" type="text/javascript"></script>


</head>
<body>

    <div data-bind="nextFieldOnEnter:true">
        <input type="text" />
        <input type="text" />
        <select>
          <option value="volvo">Volvo</option>
          <option value="saab">Saab</option>
          <option value="mercedes">Mercedes</option>
          <option value="audi">Audi</option>
        </select>
        <input type="text" />
        <input type="text" />
    </div>


    <script type="text/javascript">
    ko.bindingHandlers.nextFieldOnEnter = {
        init: function(element, valueAccessor, allBindingsAccessor) {
            $(element).on('keydown', 'input, select', function (e) {
                var self = $(this)
                , form = $(element)
                  , focusable
                  , next
                ;
                if (e.keyCode == 13) {
                    focusable = form.find('input,a,select,button,textarea').filter(':visible');
                    var nextIndex = focusable.index(this) == focusable.length -1 ? 0 : focusable.index(this) + 1;
                    next = focusable.eq(nextIndex);
                    next.focus();
                    return false;
                }
            });
        }
    };

    ko.applyBindings({});
    </script>
</body>
</html>
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Your solution is exactly what I was looking for, with one exception: I don't want this behavior on input of type buttons. How can I exclude them? I managed to define the button as <button> element, but I would like to be able to define it as <input type="button">. Thanks –  bzamfir Jan 6 at 21:14
1  
Hi. Perhaps try changing the selector as follows? .... $(element).on('keydown', 'input:not(input[type=button]), select', function (e) {..... –  Damien Sawyer Jan 7 at 0:40
    
+1; This is great, I use knockout quite a bit, but the project that I need this functionality for is an AngularJS app. If you don't mind, I'll borrow your impl code and post an answer with a custom directive for Angular. –  joshperry Jan 8 at 19:13
    
All sweet. Custom bindings are awesome when you get your head around them. :-) –  Damien Sawyer Jan 8 at 23:19

I've had a similar problem, where I wanted to press + on the numpad to tab to the next field. Now I've released a library that I think will help you.

PlusAsTab: A jQuery plugin to use the numpad plus key as a tab key equivalent.

Since you want enter/ instead, you can set the options. Find out which key you want to use with the jQuery event.which demo.

JoelPurra.PlusAsTab.setOptions({
  // Use enter instead of plus
  // Number 13 found through demo at
  // http://api.jquery.com/event.which/
  key: 13
});

// Matches all inputs with name "a[]" (needs some character escaping)
$('input[name=a\\[\\]]').plusAsTab();

You can try it out yourself in the PlusAsTab enter as tab demo.

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1  
very neat package! –  Byron Whitlock Feb 17 '12 at 23:19
    
This is interesting. But I have a question: what happens if after page load there are some more UI elements added (like when using knockout binding with an observable array)? What needs to be done to have newly added controls handle Enter as Tab as well? Thanks –  bzamfir Jan 6 at 20:39
    
@bzamfir: if it's inside a containing element with data-plus-as-tab="true", you don't need to do anything, otherwise you can run $("#new-input").plusAsTab(). Check out Dynamic elements and a sample implementation in this Improving user experience in HTML forms demo. –  Joel Purra Jan 6 at 22:55

Here is an angular.js directive to make enter go to the next field using the other answers as inspiration. There is some, perhaps, odd looking code here because I only use the jQlite packaged with angular. I believe most of the features here work in all browsers > IE8.

angular.module('myapp', [])
.directive('pdkNextInputOnEnter', function() {
    var includeTags = ['INPUT', 'SELECT'];

    function link(scope, element, attrs) {
        element.on('keydown', function (e) {
            // Go to next form element on enter and only for included tags
            if (e.keyCode == 13 && includeTags.indexOf(e.target.tagName) != -1) {
                // Find all form elements that can receive focus
                var focusable = element[0].querySelectorAll('input,select,button,textarea');

                // Get the index of the currently focused element
                var currentIndex = Array.prototype.indexOf.call(focusable, e.target)

                // Find the next items in the list
                var nextIndex = currentIndex == focusable.length - 1 ? 0 : currentIndex + 1;

                // Focus the next element
                if(nextIndex >= 0 && nextIndex < focusable.length)
                    focusable[nextIndex].focus();

                return false;
            }
        });
    }

    return {
        restrict: 'A',
        link: link
    };
});

Here's how I use it in the app I'm working on, by just adding the pdk-next-input-on-enter directive on an element. I am using a barcode scanner to enter data into fields, the default function of the scanner is to emulate a keayboard, injecting an enter key after typing the data of the scanned barcode.

There is one side-effect to this code (a positive one for my use-case), if it moves focus onto a button, the enter keyup event will cause the button's action to be activated. This worked really well for my flow as the last form element in my markup is a button that I want activated once all the fields have been "tabbed" through by scanning barcodes.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html ng-app=myapp>
  <head>
      <script src="angular.min.js"></script>
      <script src="controller.js"></script>
  </head>
  <body ng-controller="LabelPrintingController">
      <div class='.container' pdk-next-input-on-enter>
          <select ng-options="p for p in partNumbers" ng-model="selectedPart" ng-change="selectedPartChanged()"></select>
          <h2>{{labelDocument.SerialNumber}}</h2>
          <div ng-show="labelDocument.ComponentSerials">
              <b>Component Serials</b>
              <ul>
                  <li ng-repeat="serial in labelDocument.ComponentSerials">
                      {{serial.name}}<br/>
                      <input type="text" ng-model="serial.value" />
                  </li>
              </ul>
          </div>
          <button ng-click="printLabel()">Print</button>
      </div>
  </body>
</html>
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If you can I would reconsider doing this: the default action of pressing while in a form submits the form and anything you do to change this default action / expected behaviour could cause some usability issues with the site.

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1  
Normally I would agree, but our app lets users set stuff like this separately for their own accounts, and the client is offering money for it, so I don't think we can justify holding our ground. –  Ross Jun 18 '09 at 14:21
    
Except the default behavior of the enter key is already inconsistent. It only submits if you're within a text input type, most other input types have their own defined behavior for the enter key. As long as he's not mapping the tab key to something else, this seems like a far better solution than the bizarre behavior out of the box. –  Beep beep boop boop Nov 10 '11 at 11:27

I have it working in only JavaScript. Firefox won't let you update the keyCode, so all you can do is trap keyCode 13 and force it to focus on the next element by tabIndex as if keyCode 9 was pressed. The tricky part is finding the next tabIndex. I have tested this only on IE8-IE10 and Firefox and it works:

function ModifyEnterKeyPressAsTab(event)
{
    var caller;
    var key;
    if (window.event)
    {
        caller = window.event.srcElement; //Get the event caller in IE.
        key = window.event.keyCode; //Get the keycode in IE.
    }
    else
    {
        caller = event.target; //Get the event caller in Firefox.
        key = event.which; //Get the keycode in Firefox.
    }
    if (key == 13) //Enter key was pressed.
    {
        cTab = caller.tabIndex; //caller tabIndex.
        maxTab = 0; //highest tabIndex (start at 0 to change)
        minTab = cTab; //lowest tabIndex (this may change, but start at caller)
        allById = document.getElementsByTagName("input"); //Get input elements.
        allByIndex = []; //Storage for elements by index.
        c = 0; //index of the caller in allByIndex (start at 0 to change)
        i = 0; //generic indexer for allByIndex;
        for (id in allById) //Loop through all the input elements by id.
        {
            allByIndex[i] = allById[id]; //Set allByIndex.
            tab = allByIndex[i].tabIndex;
            if (caller == allByIndex[i])
                c = i; //Get the index of the caller.
            if (tab > maxTab)
                maxTab = tab; //Get the highest tabIndex on the page.
            if (tab < minTab && tab >= 0)
                minTab = tab; //Get the lowest positive tabIndex on the page.
            i++;
        }
        //Loop through tab indexes from caller to highest.
        for (tab = cTab; tab <= maxTab; tab++)
        {
            //Look for this tabIndex from the caller to the end of page.
            for (i = c + 1; i < allByIndex.length; i++)
            {
                if (allByIndex[i].tabIndex == tab)
                {
                    allByIndex[i].focus(); //Move to that element and stop.
                    return;
                }
            }
            //Look for the next tabIndex from the start of page to the caller.
            for (i = 0; i < c; i++)
            {
                if (allByIndex[i].tabIndex == tab + 1)
                {
                    allByIndex[i].focus(); //Move to that element and stop.
                    return;
                }
            }
            //Continue searching from the caller for the next tabIndex.
        }

        //The caller was the last element with the highest tabIndex,
        //so find the first element with the lowest tabIndex.
        for (i = 0; i < allByIndex.length; i++)
        {
            if (allByIndex[i].tabIndex == minTab)
            {
                allByIndex[i].focus(); //Move to that element and stop.
                return;
            }
        }
    }
}

To use this code, add it to your html input tag:

<input id="SomeID" onkeydown="ModifyEnterKeyPressAsTab(event);" ... >

Or add it to an element in javascript:

document.getElementById("SomeID").onKeyDown = ModifyEnterKeyPressAsTab;

A couple other notes:

I only needed it to work on my input elements, but you could extend it to other document elements if you need to. For this, getElementsByClassName is very helpful, but that is a whole other topic.

A limitation is that it only tabs between the elements that you have added to your allById array. It does not tab around to the other things that your browser might, like toolbars and menus outside your html document. Perhaps this is a feature instead of a limitation. If you like, trap keyCode 9 and this behavior will work with the tab key too.

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You can use my code below, tested in Mozilla, IE, and Chrome

   // Use to act like tab using enter key
    $.fn.enterkeytab=function(){
         $(this).on('keydown', 'input, select,', function(e) {
        var self = $(this)
          , form = self.parents('form:eq(0)')
          , focusable
          , next
          ;
            if (e.keyCode == 13) {
                focusable = form.find('input,a,select,button').filter(':visible');
                next = focusable.eq(focusable.index(this)+1);
                if (next.length) {
                    next.focus();
                } else {
                    alert("wd");
                    //form.submit();
                }
                return false;
            }
        });

    }

How to Use?

$("#form").enterkeytab(); // enter key tab

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