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Consider there are two wi-fk networks A & B using the same channel and they overlap with each other. I have a node (with one NIC) sitting in the overlapping area. Now this should be able to see both the network traffic (if the networks are not secured) not necessarily the same time.

My question is if the network interface is put in promiscuous mode can the node sniff traffic from both the networks the same time? even though the node will be connected to just one of the networks (since just one NIC) at any time since both the networks operate in the same channel and the NIC is put into promiscuous mode can it sniff packets belonging to both the network?

Thanks in advance

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closed as off topic by Don Roby, casperOne Apr 12 '12 at 15:00

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

With Aircrack-ng (airmon application) you can sniff both wi-fi networks well, if they are in the same channel or not.

p.s: I think that airmon sniff one channel at a time, but it does so fast that is simultaneously.

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thanks for the response, but since both the networks are open (no security key) can the card see both the traffic in promiscuous mode with out the use of any spl tool? –  broun Apr 11 '12 at 1:27
    
yes, and you can save it in a file in the hard disk for analysis –  Gustavo F Apr 11 '12 at 1:28
    
Oh OK, I was assuming that even if the node is in promiscuous mode the card can sniff only those packets whose destination address have a matching network part (i.e sniff packets destined to a node within the same network). guess im wrong. –  broun Apr 11 '12 at 1:37

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