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I'm trying to make a program to compress file to .tar.gz:

Here is the code:

import java.io.*;
import java.util.logging.Level;
import java.util.logging.Logger;
import java.util.zip.GZIPOutputStream;
import org.apache.commons.compress.archivers.tar.TarArchiveEntry;
import org.apache.commons.compress.archivers.tar.TarArchiveOutputStream;

public class Compress {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        BufferedInputStream input = null;
        try {
            input = new BufferedInputStream(new FileInputStream(new File("input_filename.filetype")));
            TarArchiveOutputStream out = null;
            try {
                out = new TarArchiveOutputStream(new GZIPOutputStream(new BufferedOutputStream(new FileOutputStream("output_filename.tar.gz"))));
                out.putArchiveEntry(new TarArchiveEntry(new File("input_filename.filetype")));

                int count;
                byte data[] = new byte[input.available()];
                while ((count = input.read(data)) != -1) {
                    out.write(data, 0, count);
                }

                input.close();
            } catch (IOException ex) {
                Logger.getLogger(Compress.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
            } finally {
                if (out != null) {
                    try {
                        out.closeArchiveEntry();
                        out.close();
                    } catch (IOException ex) {
                        Logger.getLogger(Compress.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
                    }
                }
            }
        } catch (FileNotFoundException ex) {
            Logger.getLogger(Compress.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
        } finally {
            try {
                input.close();
            } catch (IOException ex) {
                Logger.getLogger(Compress.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
            }
        }
    }
}

I'm using Apache Commons Compression as the library.

I test with 2 conditions:

  1. Compress GIF File
  2. Compress PDF File

And I compare compress using PeaZip, here is the result:

  1. Compare GIF, From Left to Right -> Code Above, PeaZip, File Input
  2. Compare PDF, From Left to Right -> Code Above, PeaZip, File Input

If the input file is GIF the size of the compress file increase, same if we using PeaZip. But for the other file it works for the compression process.

Can anyone explain what happen with this? Is there are something wrong with my code?

Thank you for your help...

share|improve this question
1  
Welcome to SO. +1 for a well-written, well-documented question. I should probably also -1 for not Googling this, as it is a very well-known characteristic of compression that it works only once. As all the answers point out, compressing something already compressed will likely make it larger, not smaller. But I'll give you the benefit of the doubt on the -1 ;-) –  Jim Garrison Apr 11 '12 at 3:25
    
Is there any suggestion what have I do if I want to reduce the GIF file size without reduce the dimension? Just a keyword it would be helpful to me :) –  Crazenezz Apr 11 '12 at 3:34
    
As all the answers said, you cannot do this. GIF files are already as compressed as they can get. You might find an exotic compression algorithm that can squeeze another 1% out, but that's about all you're going to get. It's not worth the effort. If you want more compression, you should investigate JPEG with low quality settings. –  Jim Garrison Apr 11 '12 at 3:39
    
Thank you for your help Jim :-) –  Crazenezz Apr 11 '12 at 3:44
    
Be aware that JPEG is "lossy" -- it permanently throws away information from your image but can achieve much higher compression factors, depending on how much image degradation you can tolerate. –  Jim Garrison Apr 11 '12 at 3:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Depending on what compression algorithm you're using, you'll get different results -- each type of file compresses differently. Text files, for example, compress extremely well. Also, since GIF files are already compressed using LZW compression, a second compression should have little to no effect.

From Wikipedia, "GIF images are compressed using the Lempel-Ziv-Welch (LZW) lossless data compression technique to reduce the file size without degrading the visual quality."

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graphics_Interchange_Format for more info.

share|improve this answer

Both GIF and PDF files are generally pretty well compressed already, so the LZW algorithm (used in boh Zip and GZip if I remember correctly) can't get much more out of it.

Imagine if every file could be compressed. Then we could just run gzip over and over until the file is as small as we desire :-)

share|improve this answer

GIF files are already compressed (with LZW) so you won't get much of an improvement by compressing them again (that's a basic "law" of information theory).

In fact, you may well find that the file size increases since, while you can't squeeze the data down any more, you still have to add another layer of compression control information.

That's probably what's happening in your case.

share|improve this answer

Compression only works if the content can be compressed. Most GIF files are already LZW-compressed, so they usually don't compress much more; once you include the archive headers and compression data tables, the net change is a file size increase. Many PDF files are also compressed, so you often see the same happen; in this case the PDF is large enough that GZip compression (a slightly newer version of the same LZW algorithm) can find a little more to squeeze out.

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