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I have the following defined:

#!/usr/bin/env ruby

class Something
  def self._attr_accessor key, value, type
    (class << self; self; end).send( :attr_accessor, key.to_sym)
    instance_variable_set "@#{key}", value
  end
end

class Client < Something
  _attr_accessor 'foo_bar', 'json', String
end

my_something = Client.new
puts my_something.foo_bar

But I recieve the following error:

/test_inheritance.rb:18:in `<class:Client>': undefined method `foo_bar' for Client:Class (NoMethodError)
    from ./test_inheritance.rb:14:in `<main>'

The bit of metaprograming I am doing works:

#!/usr/bin/env ruby
class Something
  def self._attr_accessor key, value, type
    (class << self; self; end).send( :attr_accessor, key.to_sym)
    instance_variable_set "@#{key}", value
  end
end

class Client < Something
  _attr_accessor 'foo_bar', 'json', String

  puts self.foo_bar
end

my_something = Client.new

#puts my_something.foo_bar

As it outputs the proper result. But how do I define the _attr_accessor methods such that I am able to access it methods publicly?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For one I think you're tripping over the fact that format is a reserved method on Class and it's conflicting with your attr_accessor attempt.

Secondly there's a better way to do this. I've made a fairly robust "accessor" utility class for a project I'm working on. It allows you to define class-level defaults and still override instance definitions.

The implementation looks like this:

module OptionAccessor
  # Given a list of names, this declares an option accessor which works like
  # a combination of cattr_accessor and attr_accessor, except that defaults
  # defined for a class will propagate down to the instances and subclasses,
  # but these defaults can be over-ridden in subclasses and instances
  # without interference. Optional hash at end of list can be used to set:
  #  * :default => Assigns a default value which is otherwise nil
  #  * :boolean => If true, creates an additional name? method and will
  #                convert all assigned values to a boolean true/false.
  def option_accessor(*args)
    option_reader(*args)
    option_writer(*args)
  end

  # Given a list of names, this declares an option reader which works like
  # a combination of cattr_reader and attr_reader, except that defaults
  # defined for a class will propagate down to the instances and subclasses,
  # but these defaults can be over-ridden in subclasses and instances
  # without interference. Optional hash at end of list can be used to set:
  #  * :default => Assigns a default value which is otherwise nil
  #  * :boolean => If true, creates an additional name? method and will
  #                convert all assigned values to a boolean true/false.
  def option_reader(*names)
    names = [ names ].flatten.compact
    options = names.last.is_a?(Hash) ? names.pop : { }

    names.each do |name|
      iv = :"@#{name}"

      (class << self; self; end).class_eval do
        if (options[:boolean])
          define_method(:"#{name}?") do
            iv_value = instance_variable_get(iv)

            !!(iv_value.nil? ? (self.superclass.respond_to?(name) ? self.superclass.send(name) : nil) : iv_value)
          end
        end

        define_method(name) do
          iv_value = instance_variable_get(iv)

          iv_value.nil? ? (self.superclass.respond_to?(name) ? self.superclass.send(name) : nil) : iv_value
        end
      end

      define_method(name) do
        iv_value = instance_variable_get(iv)

        iv_value.nil? ? self.class.send(name) : iv_value
      end

      if (options[:boolean])
        define_method(:"#{name}?") do
          iv_value = instance_variable_get(iv)

          !!(iv_value.nil? ? self.class.send(name) : iv_value)
        end
      end

      instance_variable_set(iv, options[:default])
    end
  end

  # Given a list of names, this declares an option writer which works like
  # a combination of cattr_writer and attr_writer, except that defaults
  # defined for a class will propagate down to the instances and subclasses,
  # but these defaults can be over-ridden in subclasses and instances
  # without interference. Options can be specified:
  #  * :boolean => If true, converts all supplied values to true or false
  #                unless nil, in which case nil is preserved.
  def option_writer(*names)
    names = [ names ].flatten.compact
    options = names.last.is_a?(Hash) ? names.pop : { }

    names.each do |name|
      iv = :"@#{name}"

      (class << self; self; end).class_eval do
        if (options[:boolean])
          define_method(:"#{name}=") do |value|
            instance_variable_set(iv, value.nil? ? nil : !!value)
          end
        else
          define_method(:"#{name}=") do |value|
            instance_variable_set(iv, value)
          end
        end
      end

      if (options[:boolean])
        define_method(:"#{name}=") do |value|
          instance_variable_set(iv, value.nil? ? nil : !!value)
        end
      else
        define_method(:"#{name}=") do |value|
          instance_variable_set(iv, value)
        end
      end
    end
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
This is what I'm looking for, do you have any example use cases? –  rudolph9 Apr 11 '12 at 4:03
    
also, changing the metod from format to foobar I run into and undeclared issues when called outside the class and similarly to how I originally described it works fine when called within the class indicating a private method declaration. If you could explain to me why the method is being declared private I would greatly appreciate it too! –  rudolph9 Apr 11 '12 at 4:08
1  
An example is to just put option_accessor :foo in a class. Then you can call MyClass.foo or MyClass.new.foo and so forth, even with assignment via MyClass.foo = 'foo'. –  tadman Apr 11 '12 at 15:59
    
The method wasn't being declared, but there was a pre-existing method with the same name that was already private. That was probably the issue. –  tadman Apr 11 '12 at 16:00
    
There is something about the manor which it is defined which only allows access to the method declared within the class it self (i.e. self.foo inside the class works but outside it does not.). Your response does not answer my question but I voted you up none the less for your excellent response. Thank you! –  rudolph9 Apr 11 '12 at 16:17

Try replacing your method with:

class Something

  def self._attr_accessor key, value, type
    method_sym      = key.to_sym
    insance_variable = "@#{key}"

    (class << self; self; end).send( :attr_accessor, method_sym)
    instance_variable_set insance_variable, value

    attr_accessor method_sym

    define_method(method_sym) do 
        self.instance_variable_get(insance_variable) or self.class.send(method_sym) 
    end

  end

 end

 define_method(method_sym) do 
    self.instance_variable_get(insance_variable) or self.class.send(method_sym) 
 end

in the above code, define_method is define a instance method for Someting, method name is key, such as

 attr_accessor "foo_bar", "json", String

then the define_method generated code is:

 def foo_bar
    if @foo_bar
       @foo_bar
    else
      self.class.foo_bar
    end        
 end

in addition to, ActiveSupport has attr_accessor_with_default method, seems also be this function. Please refer to it's code:

class Module
# Declare an attribute accessor with an initial default return value.t>:
#
#   class Person
#     attr_accessor_with_default :age, 25
#   end
#
#   person = Person.new
#   person.age # => 25
#
# To give attribute <tt>:element_name</tt> a dynamic default value, evaluated
# in scope of self:
#
#   attr_accessor_with_default(:element_name) { name.underscore }
#
def attr_accessor_with_default(sym, default = Proc.new)
  define_method(sym, block_given? ? default : Proc.new { default })
  module_eval(<<-EVAL, __FILE__, __LINE__ + 1)
    def #{sym}=(value)
      class << self; attr_accessor :#{sym} end
      @#{sym} = value
    end
  EVAL
end
end
share|improve this answer
    
This gets rid of my error but still I am not able to access the methods as if the were defined using attr_accessor. My whole objective is to bootstrap the preexisting methods with one which I am able to define a default for for which. –  rudolph9 Apr 11 '12 at 16:25
    
Also I am really not sure what is happening in the defin_method block, could you explain that to me? –  rudolph9 Apr 11 '12 at 16:26

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