Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I always offer a solution like this in my interviews, but I am not sure what the complexity is O(n^2), O(nlogn)?

for(i = 0; i < limit; i++)
{
    for(j = i; j < limit; j++)
    {
        // do something
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
What's your justification for your answer? –  Michael Petrotta Apr 11 '12 at 4:30
1  
How would it be O(N Log N)? Is there anything logarithmic about any part of it? –  Jerry Coffin Apr 11 '12 at 4:32
    
Well I decide it's O(N^2), but I am not sure because the second loop doesn't iterate N times? –  Kobi Apr 11 '12 at 4:33
3  
There's know way to know the final answer without knowing the complexity of "do something", but start by determining how many times "do something" will be done. –  Vaughn Cato Apr 11 '12 at 4:38

3 Answers 3

Let's analyze it.. The outer loop will run limit times.

First iteration of outer loop, i=0.. Inner loop runs limit times..
Second iteration of outer loop, i=1.. Inner loop runs limit-1 times.. 
.
.
.
.
Limit-th iteration of outer loop, i=limit-1.. Inner loop runs 1 time.. 

This gives us a complexity of O(limit) * O(limit-1) * O(limit-2)*..*O(1) which in turn makes the complexity of this piece of code O(n2)

share|improve this answer

This complexity is of course O(N^2). Why, let's analyze this in simple way using deductive way.

    Limit = 10, the iterations are = 10 + 9 + 8 + 7 + ... + 1 = 10*(10+1) / 2
    Limit = 20, the iterations are = 20 + 19 + 18 + ... + 1 = 20*(20+1) / 2
    .
    .
    .
    Limit = N, the iterations are = N + N-1 + N-2 + ... + 1 = (N)(N+1)/2 
    In big-Oh notation, its complexity is O( (N)(N+1)/2 ) = O( (N^2 + N) / 2 ) which gives O(N^2)
share|improve this answer

Just to understand, take limit as 6. Now, i can go from zero to 5 and j can go from i to 5. When i=0 j=0 to 5, i=1 j=1 to 5, i=2 j=2 to 5, i=3 j=3 to 5, i=4 j=4 to 5, i=5 j=5

So, the "do something" part of the program runs 5, 4, 3, 2 and 1 times. That means a total of 15 times for limit = 6. Or n(n+1)/2 times as sum of numbers from 1 to n is that. (Assuming limit is represented by n).

I see that it is not exactly n^2 complexity but as n becomes larger, n^2 term will dominate. Thus in my opinion it is O(n^2).

share|improve this answer
4  
Not just O(n^2) in your opinion: "as n becomes larger, n^2 term will dominate` is the definition of O(n^2). So you're spot on. –  Li-aung Yip Apr 11 '12 at 4:50
    
@Li-aungYip thanks for confirming. –  Gaurav Sinha Apr 11 '12 at 5:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.