Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm solving www.db-class.com exercises. Even though it's late the questions are still interesting. I stumbled upon last task in extras and cannot figure out the solution.

The SQL scheme is as follows:

create table Movie(mID int, title text, year int, director text);
create table Reviewer(rID int, name text); 
create table Rating(rID int, mID int, stars int, ratingDate date);

The whole database can be obtainted here

The question is the following:

Q12 For each director, return the director's name together with the title(s) of the movie(s) they directed that received the highest rating among all of their movies, and the value of that rating. Ignore movies whose director is NULL.

To give more specific details what's the problem here:

One query

select m.mid, m.title, max(r.stars) as stars 
from rating r natural join movie m 
where m.director is NOT NULL group by m.mid

returns IDs of most rated movies:

101 Gone with the Wind       4
103 The Sound of Music       3
104 E.T.                     3
107 Avatar                   5
108 Raiders of the Lost Ark  4

Another query

select m.director, max(r.stars) as stars 
from rating r natural join movie m 
where m.director is NOT NULL group by m.director 

returns names of the directors with most rated movies for them:

James Cameron       5
Robert Wise         3
Steven Spielberg    4
Victor Fleming      4

How to join the queries and get the name and stars for most rated movie for the director:

James Cameron      Avatar                   5
Robert Wise        The Sound of Music       3
Steven Spielberg   Raiders of the Lost Ark  4
Victor Fleming     Gone with the Wind       4
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In my opinion this is just a gretest-n-per-group problem. There is even a tag for that :)

The only difference with the typical situation is that the grouping data (director) is in one table and the data used to make the comparison is in another table (stars). So, if you look in the question tagged as such you should find similar examples.

I'd recommend you to solve it first assuming all your data is in one table (awful, but easier to solve... at least for me). And then switch to the splitted data.

Spoiler:

I think this is how to solve this so take a look at it only if you have already proposed a solution.

select distinct m1.director, m1.title, r1.stars from movie m1
join rating r1 on m1.mID = r1.mID
left join (
    select m2.director, r2.stars from movie m2
    join rating r2 on m2.mID = r2.mID
) s on m1.director = s.director and r1.stars < s.stars
where s.stars is null and m1.director is not null
share|improve this answer
    
The solution returns NULL directors and doesn't get titles. The task is simple without titles or without directors, but when they are required both, it's much more tricky –  Anton K Apr 11 '12 at 6:39
    
Not really :) I added the movie title and removed null directors (I am not sure if ignore movies whose director is NULL means to remove them from the result, so just in case, I did) –  Mosty Mostacho Apr 11 '12 at 6:43
    
I found a similar solution, but it gives more than one directors for all movies. The answers clearly requires one director per movie per max(stars) –  Anton K Apr 11 '12 at 6:46
1  
Really, it works now. No any magic. Why did I could not I figure the solution out for so long? –  Anton K Apr 11 '12 at 7:00
1  
Probably you haven't read this :) –  Mosty Mostacho Apr 11 '12 at 7:02

Suggestion:

  1. Create a simple query that lists all the directors (easy)

  2. Do a "join" that links each movie - along with its director - to the corresponding rating

  3. Take the "join" from step 2 and do a "group by" director and "max(rating)"

share|improve this answer
    
I did it. It gives more than one directors for all movies. The answers clearly requires one director per movie per max(stars). –  Anton K Apr 11 '12 at 6:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.