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how does the browser differentiate a cookie is from client-side created (JavaScript) or server-side created (ASP.NET). Is it possible to delete cookie created from server side in client side and vice versa, I'm struggling to delete a cookie was created from client-side using javascript in ASP.NET code-behind.

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asp cookie vs javascript cookie –  Kashif Apr 11 '12 at 6:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

how does the browser differentiate a cookie is from Client side(javascript created) or serverside created (Asp.net).

It doesn't. A cookie is a cookie.

The closest it comes is the HTTP Only flag, which allows a cookie to be hidden from JavaScript. (This provides a little defence against XSS cookie theft).

it is possible to delete cookie created from server side in client side and vice versa

Yes. A cookie is a cookie. (Again, client side code can't touch an HTTP only cookie)

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i solved the problem actually my client side script followed UTC time format and in serverside GMT format, while deleting i just did " oCookie.Expires =DateTime.Now.AddDays(-1d).ToUniversalTime();" still has some doubt since you said "it is possible to delete cookie created from server side in client side and vice versa" why cant i delete a http only cookie is there any security behind that property.. –  Chandru velan Apr 12 '12 at 4:08
1  
There is nothing but security being the property. The whole point of it is to hide it from client side scripting. –  Quentin Apr 12 '12 at 8:34

As far as I know it is possible if there is not property HttpOnly owasp wikipedia.

In chrome, for the cookies, there is a field - Accessible by script, which indicates if HttpOnly is set.

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thanks spending your valuable time i gone through both links its very informative. –  Chandru velan Apr 12 '12 at 4:16

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