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could someone give me a brief explanation of what is happening differently in the functions below?

    void f1(data_t **d)
    {
        for (int i=0; i<MAXSIZE; i++)
        {
            (*d)[i].ival = i;
        }
    }

    void f2(data_t **d)
    {
        for (int i=0; i<MAXSIZE; i++)
        {
            (*d)->ival = i;
            (*d)++
        }
    }

    void f3(data_t *d)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i<MAXSIZE; i++)
        {
            d->ival = i;
            d++;
        }
    }

    void f4(data_t *d)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i<MAXSIZE; i++)
        {
            d[i].ival = i;
        }
    }

particularly what is happening differently in f2. but clearly different things are happening in each.

f1 and f3 do the same thing (but differently). f2 fails completely, and f4 is buggy (works in this example, but when i tried to put other values into other pointers (char *) the strings end up strange.)

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3  
Is this homework? –  loganfsmyth Apr 11 '12 at 6:37
1  
IS THIS HOMEWORK ???? –  giorashc Apr 11 '12 at 6:37
1  
IT'S NOT HOMEWORK –  Sun Apr 11 '12 at 6:43
1  
@mat sorry forgot a dot >.> –  Sun Apr 11 '12 at 6:47
2  
@giorashc: You're not a Grim Reaper, so please don't use "all caps". –  SigTerm Apr 11 '12 at 6:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
void f1(data_t **d)
{
    for (int i=0; i<MAXSIZE; i++)
    {
        (*d)[i].ival = i;
    }
}

The d seems to be a pointer to array of data_t's (or is a 1-element array of arrays of data_t). It is dereferenced to recover the array of data_t's and then i-th element of this array is modified.

void f2(data_t **d)
{
    for (int i=0; i<MAXSIZE; i++)
    {
        (*d)->ival = i;
        (*d)++
    }
}

This is a bit tricky and indeed does something different than in the first case. There was a pointer to array of data_t's. Here we have an array of pointers to data_t's. The pointer to first element is dereferenced to retrieve a pointer to data. Then -> is used to access the data and value is modified ( x->y = (*x).y ). Finally the pointer is moved to the next element of main array.

void f3(data_t *d)
{
    for (int i = 0; i<MAXSIZE; i++)
    {
        d->ival = i;
        d++;
    }
}

Here we have simpler case, the d is just an array of data_t's accessed by pointer. Inside the loop, an element is accessed by ->, and then d is incremented to point to next element of array.

void f4(data_t *d)
{
    for (int i = 0; i<MAXSIZE; i++)
    {
        d[i].ival = i;
    }
}

Similarly to f3, elements are modified by the [] operator.

Note the following facts:

int[] =(def) int *

if a is of type int * and i is of any integral type, then:

*(a + i) =(def) a[i]

Also, if a points to first element of an array, then

*a =(def) a[0]

and then, after a "a++"

*a =(def) a[1]

...and so on.

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this is a huge help to my understanding!!! what does (def) do in the above code? –  Sun Apr 11 '12 at 7:15
    
=(def) equals to "means the same by definition", it is not an actual source code. –  Spook Apr 11 '12 at 7:21

Let's take these one at a time:

// f1
(*d)[i].ival = i;

First, (*d) is dereferencing d, which appears to be a pointer to an array of data_t variables. This allows access to the actual array, such that [i] is accessing the i-th element of the array and assigning i to it.

// f2
(*d)->ival = i;
(*d)++;

(*d) is dereferencing d just like in the first one. However, there is one crucial bit of information about arrays that you should understand before moving on...

int j[2] = { 42, 50 };
int j0 = *j; // j0 is now 42
j += 1;
int j1 = *j; // j1 is now 50

Arrays are implemented as individual variables sequentially oriented in "slots" in memory, and an array is really just a pointer to the first slot. As such, *j is dereferencing j, which is currently pointing to the first element, resulting in 42. Doing j += 1 advances the pointer by one "slot", such that *j will now result in 50.

Now, back to f2. (*d)->ival is exactly like doing (**d).ival. This is very much like the simple example I gave above. The next line, (*d)++, is advancing the pointer to the next "slot". Consider this simple diagram of what's "happening" in memory:

      +------+------+
      |*(j+0)|*(j+1)|
j --->|------|------|
      |  42  |  50  |
      +------+------+

with j pointing to the first "slot", the dereference shown in the first row, the value in the second.

f3 is very much like f2, except that it expects the array to be passed as an argument, instead of a pointer to it. Hence, d only needs to be dereferenced once with the -> operator (again, exactly like (*d).ival).

f4is very much like f1, except that it expects the array to be passed as an argument, instead of a pointer to it. Hence, d[i] is directly accessing the i-ith element of the array.

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this has also been a huge help! thank you! –  Sun Apr 11 '12 at 7:19
 void f1(data_t **d) 
    { 
        for (int i=0; i<MAXSIZE; i++) 
        { 
            (*d)[i].ival = i; 
        } 
    } 
  1. You get a pointer to array **d of data_t ,which element is a structure,having a field ival
  2. Access the array *d
  3. Iterate all array elements,element by element,changing indices i.And updating ival of each array element by to be i

Note:You dont change the pointer*d`,pointing to array beginning

void f2(data_t **d) 
{ 
    for (int i=0; i<MAXSIZE; i++) 
    { 
        (*d)->ival = i; 
        (*d)++ 
    } 
} 
  1. You get a pointer to array **d of data_t ,which element is a structure,having a field ival
  2. Access the array *d,which is also a pointer to the array (first element)
  3. Updating ival of the (above) element by to be i,using pointer notation (*d)->ival = i;
  4. Promote the pointer to the next array element (*d)++ and return to 2.From now on *d is pointing to the "sifted"array beginning.

    void f3(data_t *d)

    { 
       for (int i = 0; i<MAXSIZE; i++) 
       { 
          d->ival = i; 
          d++; 
       } 
    } 
    

    1.You get an array *d of data_t ,which element is sa structure,having a field ival.

    2.It also can be considered you get a pointer to the first element of array. Access access and update ival to be i,by pointer: d->ival = i;

    3.Promote the pointer to the next array element d++

    void f4(data_t *d)

    { 
       for (int i = 0; i<MAXSIZE; i++) 
       { 
          d[i].ival = i; 
          d++; 
       } 
    } 
    

As in f3.But you promote indices and update ival using reference notation (by value)

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this is extremely helpful information with very clear explanations. –  Sun Apr 11 '12 at 7:32

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