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I have a very simple test going with shared objects in flex with mobile I have a person class.

package
{
    import flash.display.MovieClip;


    public class Person extends MovieClip
    {
        var personsname:String="";
        public function Person(name:String)
        {
            personsname = name;
        }
    }
}

And then some simplish code in a view.

    var person1:Person;
                var person2:Person;
                var person3:Person;
                var person4:Person;
                var thePeople:Array=[];
                var so:SharedObject;
                function init():void{
                person1 = new Person("james");
                person2 = new Person("mike");
                person3 = new Person("Amanda");
                person4 = new Person("Shelly");
                thePeople.push(person1,person2,person3,person4);
                    //so = SharedObject.getLocal("savedData"); //clear it again
                ///so.clear(); // clear it again
                savePeople();
                getPeople();
                }

                private function savePeople():void{
                    so = SharedObject.getLocal("savedData");
                    if(so.data.thePeopleArray == null){
                        so.data.thePeopleArray = thePeople;
                        so.flush();
                    }
                }


                private function getPeople():void{
                    so = SharedObject.getLocal("savedData");
                    var thePeeps:Array = so.data.thePeopleArray;
                    trace(thePeeps);
            }

The first time I run this it traces out [object Person] 4 times I close the emulator and rebuild and run it traces out

,,,

If I clear out the so it show the [object Person] again, but comment out get the ,,,

Can shared objects even store an array of objects properly. It is the same with the persistanceManager I believe.

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The root of the problem here is that you are trying to save an instance MovieClip into the SharedObject. Since the MovieClip is an intrinsic object (native to flash) it cannot be converted into a form which can be stored. This causes flash to convert the data into a generic Object which is stored to disk. I can only guess at exactly what is going into the SharedObject at this point.

It seems to work the first time because flash does not actually load the shared object in the getPeople() call, it just uses the object which is already in memory. The second time the app runs it reads the generic object from disk and creates a generic object.

There is another problem which is that the flash player does not know to pass data to the constructor when it reads the object.

There are a few possible workarounds, some are:

  • Store the data as text
  • Store the data as a ByteArray
  • Store the data in a "Data Object"

Each of these requires some conversion during the read and write process, but this can be simplified using an interface. This also adds flexibility in case your object changes you will still be able to read the data in the SharedObject.

1: Text

As an example, you might add two methods to the Person object, call them serialise() and deserialise(). The serialise() method will return text which can be stored in the shared object. The deserialise() will parse text and populate the values of the object.

Here's a sample to illustrate this:

class Person {
    private var name:String;
    private var age:int;

    public function serialise():String {
        return [name, age].join("\t");
    }

    public function deserialise(input:String):void {
        var tokens:Array = input.split("\t");
        name = tokens[0];
        age = parseInt(tokens[1]);
    }

    public static function create(name:String, age:int):Person
    {
        var output:Person = new Person();
        output.name = name;
        output.age = age;
        return output;
    }
}

For ease of use we can create a class for managing a collection of people:

class People {
    private var people:Vector.<Person> = new Vector.<Person>();

    public function clear():void {
        people.splice(0, people.length);
    }

    public function add(person:Person):void {
        people.push(person);
    }

    public function serialise():String {
        var output:Array = [];

        for each (var person:Person in people)
            output.push(person.serialise());

        return output.join("\n");
    }

    public function deserialise(input:String):void {
       var tokens:Array = input.split("\n");

       for each (var token:String in tokens) {
           var person:Person = new Person();
           person.deserialise(token);
           add(person);
       }
    }

    public function save():void {
        var so:SharedObject = SharedObject.getLocal("cookie");
        so.data.people = serialise();
        so.flush();
    }

    public function load():void
    {
        var so:SharedObject = SharedObject.getLocal("cookie");

        if (so.data.people != null)
            deserialise(so.data.people);
    }
}     

Usage:

var people:People = new People();
people.load();
trace(people.serialise());

people.clear();
people.add(Person.create("Candy", 21));
people.add(Person.create("Sandy", 23));
people.add(Person.create("Randy", 27));
people.save();
trace(people.serialise());

An obvious flaw in this example is that the \n and \t characters cannot be used as part of the data (ie for the name of a person). This is a common short-coming with text data.

** Update: Look into the built-in JSON methods for a consistent approach to serialising objects to and from text.

2: ByteArray

Very similar to the text method described above, except the serialise/deserialise methods would accept an additional parameter of a ByteArray, which the object would write to. The ByteArray would then be saved and loaded from the shared object. The advantages of this method is that resulting data is usually is compact and versatile than the text method.

Flash also defines the IDataInput and IDataOutput interface which can be used here.

3: Data Objects

If you still prefer the storing objects directly, then you could create a proxy object which serves the sole purpose of carrying data. A data object (aka DO) is a an object which only has variables, and not methods. Eg:

class PersonDO {
    public var name:String;
}

It would be used something like this:

            var person2:Person;
            var person3:Person;
            var person4:Person;
            var thePeople:Array=[];
            var so:SharedObject;
            function init():void{
            person1 = new Person("james");
            person2 = new Person("mike");

            // store the people data into data objects
            person1DO = new PersonDO();
            person1DO.name = person1.name;

            person2DO = new PersonDO();
            person2DO.name = person2.name;

            thePeople.push(person1DO,person2DO);
            savePeople();

            // load the people into data objects
            getPeople();
            person1 = new Person(thePeople[0].name);
            person2 = new Person(thePeople[1].name);

            private function savePeople():void{
                so = SharedObject.getLocal("savedData");
                if(so.data.thePeopleArray == null){
                    so.data.thePeopleArray = thePeople;
                    so.flush();
                }
            }


            private function getPeople():void{
                so = SharedObject.getLocal("savedData");
                var thePeeps:Array = so.data.thePeopleArray;
                trace(thePeeps);
        }    

Even though this may appear simpler than the alternatives there are downsides to storing objects directly: - Stored data is very fragile - if you change the object then your data will become unusable unless you have several versions of each object. - You need to ensure that a reference to the data object is compiled into the application. - A common usage scenario for Shared Objects is to save data objects from one SWF, and load them in another. You need ensure that both SWFs use identical version of the class being saved and loaded.

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
1  
The first paragraph says it all - SharedObjects don't store display-based objects. Also one thing mention, is another way to overcome the limitation of anonymizing objects is to use the [RemoteClass] metatag - this will auto-apply the createAlias method for you, so that when it encounters an object that matches that signature it gives you back an instance of the class you were expecting and not just of type Object. – Mike Petty Apr 11 '12 at 14:13
    
Thanks for the great explanation and the code samples. – james Apr 12 '12 at 5:57

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