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I just want to know what is the difference between these two messaging constants. Which one should I use in WndProc method when overriding, to handle close button message.

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You tagged this [winforms], use the FormClosing event. Pay attention to the passed e.CloseReason, set e.Cancel = true to prevent the close. –  Hans Passant Apr 11 '12 at 8:02
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2 Answers 2

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WM_CLOSE is sent as a window message whenever the window is requested to be closed, by any means.

SC_CLOSE is sent as a parameter of a WM_SYSCOMMAND message, when the user presses the Close button (or selects Close from the control menu of the window).

Which one you listen for is determined by which action(s) you attempting to intercept/deal with.

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Suppose that I want to cancel all pending validations on the form and let the user close the window gracefully, what would I chose then? –  Soham Dasgupta Apr 11 '12 at 7:52
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If you want to do this whenever the window is closed (be it by the user pressing the Close button, or a button within your application asking for the window to close, or when e.g. Task Manager sends the window a close message), use WM_CLOSE. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Apr 11 '12 at 7:54
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An application can prompt the user for confirmation, prior to destroying a window, by processing the WM_CLOSE message and calling the DestroyWindow function only if the user confirms the choice. –  Sergey Berezovskiy Apr 11 '12 at 7:55
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever I'm asking this just out of curiosity as I've just understood the power of Windows messages. Suppose I have a textbox in one tabpage, the validation in that textbox fails but still the user is able to go to the other tabpage. Is there a way with messages to stop the user from going to the other tabpage untill the control is validated. –  Soham Dasgupta Apr 11 '12 at 8:04
    
@SohamDasgupta - possibly - but I'd avoid it if possible. I'd put a warning sign next to any controls with invalid content, and possibly a warning above the tab control showing "some settings are invalid", but let the user freely move between tab pages - it's a better experience for the user. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Apr 11 '12 at 8:14
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According to msdn, CS_CLOSE is one of wParam values of WM_SYSCOMMAND message.

A window receives this message when the user chooses a command from the Window menu (formerly known as the system or control menu) or when the user chooses the maximize button, minimize button, restore button, or close button.

WM_CLOSE is a message itself.

Sent as a signal that a window or an application should terminate.

So, when window receives WM_SYSCOMMAND with parameter value CS_CLOSE, then you can close window (send WM_CLOSE message).

UPDATE (if you want to let user to close the window gracefully): An application can prompt the user for confirmation, prior to destroying a window, by processing the WM_CLOSE message and calling the DestroyWindow function only if the user confirms the choice.

BTW if you use C#, you can handle FormClosing event and do you work there. If you need to cancel closing, then just set e.Cancel = true for event argument.

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I've used form closing event but that just fires off after the validation event on the control has executed which is not the behavior I want. I just came across this article which explained this hack –  Soham Dasgupta Apr 11 '12 at 8:08
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Actually FormClosing event comes before validation. Validation occured because textBox loses focus when messagebox "Close window?" displayed. Just set CausesValidation = false; at the top of your FormClosing event handler (before you show messagebox). –  Sergey Berezovskiy Apr 11 '12 at 8:32
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