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I've noticed other developers using this technique, but it always confused me. I decided to investigate this morning and came across the following on MSDN (from http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/d5x73970(v=vs.100).aspx):

public class GenericList<T> where T : Employee
{
...
}

Why would we want to use this method instead of replacing all instances of T with Employee in the class? To me, this seems like a win on maintainability. I can understand restricting to an interface as a means of including classes from different inheritance hierarchies, but inheritance already solves the problem above in a more obvious way, doesn't it?

Could this be considered a mistake, or would it be a mistake to 'fix' code like this?

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While this now makes sense to me, I think I've still seen this method used when a non-generic approach would be more appropriate, which may have blurred my vision to the more acceptable uses. –  Sprague Apr 11 '12 at 8:28
    
@sprague: can you give an example? Preferably from the lib? –  Henk Holterman Apr 11 '12 at 8:44
    
@Henk Holterman: It suffices to say that there will be cases where a type parameter is superfluous. This was such a case, I was mostly interested in the valid cases for a type parameter with a specific class in it's constraints. I didn't want to pass judgement on the situation until I understood the case for such a use (which, thanks to you and others, I now do.) –  Sprague Apr 11 '12 at 10:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Because it could be something derived from Employee.

public class EvilEmployee : Employee {
    public Int32 Evilness { get; set; }
}

It's now possible to do...

GenericList<EvilEmployee> list = GetEvilEmployees();
var mostEvilEmployee = list.OrderByDescending(e => e.Evilness).First();

It's possible since we know, at compile time, that T = EvilEmployee and that EvilEmployee has an Evilness property. If we were to force the list into a list of Employee that wouldn't be possible (without using OfType).

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To amplify: if a class with class-constrained generic type T had no methods which returned anything of type T or a type involving T, had no ref/out parameters of type T or a type involving T, and accepted no consumers of type T or a type involving T, then one could generally replace all occurrences of type T with the constraining type. The class itself wouldn't mind substituting the constraining type for the generic, but if it has any of the return or parameter types mentioned, code which wants to use the class with derived types would have problems. –  supercat Apr 11 '12 at 23:34

Why would we want to use this method instead of replacing all instances of T with Employee in the class?

To enable:

class Manager : Employee { ... }

var board = new GenericList<Manager> ();

Note that your name 'GenericList' would in this scenario be more like 'EmployeeList'

I can understand restricting to an interface as a means of including classes from different inheritance hierarchies

Class inheritance and interfaces have much in common.

but inheritance already solves the problem above in a more obvious way, doesn't it?

Yes, but it's not the same. board.Add(lowlyProgrammer); will fail here while inheritance would allow it.

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Manager is already an employee, this is already possible with polymorphism... am I missing something? –  Sprague Apr 11 '12 at 8:19
    
@Sprague: board.Add(lowlyProgrammer); would fail here. –  Henk Holterman Apr 11 '12 at 8:20
1  
+1 succinct - a simple way of enforcing type-hierarchy safety on the generic whilst also keeping the in/out types (e.g. add/get methods) equal to the type T; simplifying the use for the caller over if it were a non-generic. –  Andras Zoltan Apr 11 '12 at 8:20
    
Thank you for your answer, Simon's made it clear to me immediately, however. + for speed. –  Sprague Apr 11 '12 at 8:26

Where statement is added on purpose. Think of a situation where there are classes deriving from Employee class; if you do not define a generic class, you need to define a class for each derived class.

For instance, if EmployeeX inherits Employee, and you want to define a List only accepting EmployeeX instances, by using the generic approach you do not need to define a new class.

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The generics allow you to be typesafe without the need to cast.

if you have

  public class Manager : Employee
  {
     public double CalculateManagerBonus();
  }

you can do

   GenericList<Manager> managers = ....

   managers[0].CalculateManagerBonus();

if you have

   GenericList<Employee> managers = ....

   // this is a compiler error
   managers[0].CalculateManagerBonus();

  // this is neccessary if there where no generics.
  ((Manager)managers[0]).CalculateManagerBonus();
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