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We have a Class(say Animal), and we have an Interface(say Behave). Both Animal as well as Behave have a method with the same signature(say public void eat()).

When we try to write the body for the method eat() in a Class(say Dog) which extends Animal and implements Behave, which eat() method is actually referred to? The one in Animal or Behave. In whichever case that happens, why does it happen that way?

Edit:

I tried this scenario on Eclipse before posting this question.

An interesting part here is, even though I am implementing Behave, if I dont create an eat() method(i.e. if I dont implement Behave's inherited abstract method) inside Dog, there is no error, since I am already extending from Animal which has an eat() method.

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What do you mean by "which method eat() is actually referred to?" In a way it refers to both; you override the method of Animal and you provide an implementation of the (itself abstract) method given by your interface Behave. Your question isn't quite clear. –  Anthales Apr 11 '12 at 10:05

4 Answers 4

which eat() method is actually referred to? BOTH.

Try this: if you don't override the method at all, when you call with the interface, you will get the one from the parent.

Behave b = new Dog();
System.out.println(b.eat());//this will call eat from Animal if Dog did not override.

If you override, you always get the one from the child:

Behavior b = new Dog();
Animal a = new Dog();

a.eat() and b.eat() will both refer to the eat inside of Dog class.

USE THESE CLASSES:

public class BClass {
public int add(int a, int b){
    return a*b;
}
}

public interface BInterface {
public int add(int a, int b);
}

public class BChild extends BClass implements BInterface{
public static void main(String... args){
    BInterface bi = new BChild();
    BClass bc = new BChild();
    System.out.println(bi.add(3, 5));
    System.out.println(bi.add(3, 5));
}

@Override
public int add(int a, int b){
    return a+b;
}
}
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Thanks. Yes, I had tried that on Eclipse before posting this question. An interesting part here is, even though I am implementing an interface, if I dont create an eat() method(which means I am implementing the interface's method) inside Dog, there is no error. –  Michael Fernando Apr 12 '12 at 3:48

interface can contain only body definition of method , once you implements, it must have implementation of all defined methods. In you example

class Dog extends Animal implements Behave
{
    @Override
    public void eat() {...}
 }

 abstract class Animal{
    public abstract void eat();
 }
 interface Behave{
    void eat();
 }

Here it need a body of abstract method where as it is in Main method. In other way

class DOG extends Animal implements Behave{
    ...
}

class Animal{
   public  void eat(){
        ...
   }
}

interface Behave{
    void eat();
}

Here Dog class having eat method body in its super class Animal. So it wount ask to implement body again in Animal as it is already implemented.

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An interface simply defines a method that a class must provide. If we have

public class Animal{
    public void eat(){
        System.out.println("Om nom nom");
    }
}
public class Dog extends Animal{

}

Dog now provides the eat method and can so implement Behave.

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2  
That is, if Dog extends Animal –  Glenn VdB Apr 11 '12 at 9:41
    
@Boosty Hah, yes. Missed out the most important part ;) –  Jim Apr 11 '12 at 9:42

There is only one eat() method, because the designers of the language decided that the simplicity of having the method signature consist of its name and argument types was more useful than having the complexity of being able to specify that you are providing an implementation of an interface.

In Java, if the two have different semantics, provide a method which returns a Behave instance which does something else:

class Animal { 
    public void eat () { }
}

interface Behave { 
    void eat (); 
}

class Dog extends Animal { 
    public void eat () { 
        // override of Animal.eat()
    } 

    public Behave getBehave() { 
        return new Behave { 
            public void eat() { 
                BehaveEat(); 
            } 
        };
    }

    private void BehaveEat() {
        // effectively the implementation Behave.eat()
    }
}

In other languages, you can explicitly state that a method implements a method from an interface.

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