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Consider a problem where a random sublist of k items, Y, must be selected from X, a list of n items, where the items in Y must appear in the same order as they do in X. The selected items in Y need not be distinct. One solution is this:

for i = 1 to k
    A[i] = floor(rand * n) + 1
    Y[i] = X[A[i]]
sort Y according to the ordering of A

However, this has running time O(k log k) due to the sort operation. To remove this it's tempting to

high_index = n
for i = 1 to k
    index = floor(rand * high_index) + 1
    Y[k - i + 1] = X[index]
    high_index = index

But this gives a clear bias to the returned list due to the uniform index selection. It feels like a O(k) solution is attainable if the indices in the second solution were distributed non-uniformly. Does anyone know if this is the case, and if so what properties the distribution the marginal indices are drawn from has?

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Maybe I am missing something, but why not just traverse the whole original list, deciding on every element, to keep it or not? That would maintain the original ordering and time is linear. –  noncom Apr 11 '12 at 11:41
3  
@noncom that only gives you an average of k items in the list (if you use probability of k/n for selecting the item). here you need to guarantee k items and have them be random. –  andrew cooke Apr 11 '12 at 11:50
2  
It seems that the first solution allows an item to be selected twice. Is it the case? Or can each item be selected at most once? These are two completely different questions. –  amit Apr 11 '12 at 11:52
    
Sorry I should have made it clear that items may be selected twice. The second algorithm also allows this I believe (I'm using 1-based arrays, although in hindsight I don't know why I did that...). –  timxyz Apr 11 '12 at 11:59
    
I can propose an easy solution with complexity O(n + k) if that will do. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Apr 11 '12 at 12:39
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6 Answers 6

Unbiased O(n+k) solution is trivial, high-level pseudo code.

  • create an empty histogram of size n [initialized with all elements as zeros]
  • populate it with k uniformly distributed variables at range. (do k times histogram[inclusiveRand(1,n)]++)
  • iterate the initial list [A], while decreasing elements in the histogram and appending elements to the result list.

Explanation [edit]:

  • The idea is to chose k elements out of n at random, with uniform distribution for each, and create a histogram out of it.
  • This histogram now contains for each index i, how many times A[i] will appear in the resulting Y list.
  • Now, iterate the list A in-order, and for each element i, insert A[i] into the resulting Y list histogram[i] times.
  • This guarantees you maintain the order because you insert elements in order, and "never go back".
  • It also guarantees unbiased solution since for each i,j,K: P(histogram[i]=K) = P(histogram[j]=K), so for each K, each element has the same probability to appear in the resulting list K times.

I believe it can be done in O(k) using the order statistics [X(i)] but I cannot figure it out though :\

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The term 'order statistics' gives me an interesting direction to look in, so thanks for dropping it in! –  timxyz Apr 11 '12 at 12:52
    
what is a histogram in this context? do you mean array? and histogram[inclusiveRand(1,n)]++] looks like it has a syntax error? for a "trivial" solution this is very hard to understand. –  andrew cooke Apr 11 '12 at 13:02
    
I'm not sure that the order statistics help. They'll give e.g. the probability that the second element of your sublist is X[3], but I don't think you can turn that around to actually generate the sublist. –  Rawling Apr 11 '12 at 13:18
    
@andrewcooke: (1) I was referring to a histogram. An array is only one way to implement an histogram, I could also use a hash-map. (2) I fail to understand how can a pseudo code have syntax errors, the last ] refers to closing the explanation **[**k times `histogram[....]++ ** ] ** –  amit Apr 11 '12 at 13:19
    
@Rawling: I think using their distribution function, one can randomly generate X_(i) iteratively. However, as I said - I cannot figure out how it can be done... –  amit Apr 11 '12 at 13:22
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By your first algorithm, it suffices to generate k uniform random samples of [0, 1) in sorted order.

Let X1, ..., Xk be these samples. Given that Xk = x, the conditional distribution of X1, ..., Xk-1 is k - 1 uniform random samples of [0, x) in sorted order, so it suffices to sample Xk and recurse.

What's the probability that Xk < x? Each of k independent samples of [0, 1) must be less than x, so the answer (the cumulative distribution function for Xk) is x^k. To sample according to the cdf, all we have to do is invert it on a uniform random sample of [0, 1): pow(random(), 1.0 / k).


Here's an (expected) O(k) algorithm I actually would consider implementing. The idea is to dump the samples into k bins, sort each bin, and concatenate. Here's some untested Python:

def samples(n, k):
    bins = [[] for i in range(k)]
    for i in range(k):
        x = randrange(n)
        bins[(x * k) // n].append(x)
    result = []
    for bin in bins:
        bin.sort()
        result.extend(bin)
    return result

Why is this efficient in expectation? Let's suppose we use insertion sort on each bin (each bin has expected size O(1)!). On top of operations that are O(k), we're going to pay proportionally to the number of sum of the squares of the bin sizes, which is basically the number of collisions. Since the probability of two samples colliding is at most something like 4/k and we have O(k^2) pairs of samples, the expected number of collisions is O(k).

I suspect rather strongly that the O(k) guarantee can be made with high probability.

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P.S.: if you care about the quality of your samples, please don't do this -- the limitations of floating point will do you in. –  oldboy Apr 11 '12 at 13:38
    
The previous comment refers to the first algorithm. –  oldboy Apr 11 '12 at 14:23
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You can use counting sort to sort Y and thus make the sorting linear with respect to k. However for that you need one additional array of length n. If we assume you have already allocated that, you may execute the code you are asking for arbitrary many times with complexity O(k).

The idea is just as you describe, but I will use one more array cnt of size n that I assume is initialized to 0, and another "stack" st that I assume is empty.

for i = 1 to k
    A[i] = floor(rand * n) + 1
    cnt[A[i]]+=1
    if cnt[A[i]] == 1  // Needed to be able to traverse the inserted elements faster
      st.push(A[i])

for elem in st
  for i = 0 to cnt[elem]
    Y.add(X[elem])

for elem in st
  cnt[elem] = 0

EDIT: as mentioned by oldboy what I state in the post is not true - I still have to sort st, which might be a bit better then the original proposition but not too much. So This approach will only be good if k is comparable to n and then we just iterate trough cnt linearly and construct Y this way. This way st is not needed:

for i = 1 to k
    A[i] = floor(rand * n) + 1
    cnt[A[i]]+=1

for i = 1 to k
  for j = 0 to cnt[i]
    Y.add(X[i])
  cnt[i] =0
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This is O(n+k), since at the very least it takes O(n) to initialize the array to 0. –  DRVic Apr 11 '12 at 13:42
    
@DRVic I did say that both in my comment under the OP question and I also mention in this post that if we assume the array has already been allocated and initialized. This is done only once for all similar tasks so depending on the number of execution may be ok to ignore. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Apr 11 '12 at 13:47
1  
Don't we need to sort st so that the second loop generates elements in the right order? –  oldboy Apr 11 '12 at 13:49
    
@DRVic: You can initialize an array in O(1): have a look: eli.thegreenplace.net/2008/08/23/… –  amit Apr 11 '12 at 13:50
    
@oldboy yes that is correct. So what I propose will only be optimizing if n > k*log(k) and it's complexity will be O(n +k) even if the assumptions I mention are true. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Apr 11 '12 at 13:53
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

For the first index in Y, the distribution of indices in X is given by:

P(x; n, k) = binomial(n - x + k - 2, k - 1) / norm

where binomial denotes calculation of the binomial coefficient, and norm is a normalisation factor, equal to the total number of possible sublist configurations.

norm = binomial(n + k - 1, k)

So for k = 5 and n = 10 we have:

  • norm = 2002
  • P(x = 0) = 0.357, P(x <= 0) = 0.357
  • P(x = 1) = 0.245, P(x <= 1) = 0.604
  • P(x = 2) = 0.165, P(x <= 2) = 0.769
  • P(x = 3) = 0.105, P(x <= 3) = 0.874
  • P(x = 4) = 0.063, P(x <= 4) = 0.937
  • ... (we can continue this up to x = 10)

We can sample the X index of the first item in Y from this distribution (call it x1). The distribution of the second index in Y can then be sampled in the same way with P(x; (n - x1), (k - 1)), and so on for all subsequent indices.

My feeling now is that the problem is not solvable in O(k), because in general we are unable to sample from the distribution described in constant time. If k = 2 then we can solve in constant time using the quadratic formula (because the probability function simplifies to 0.5(x^2 + x)) but I can't see a way to extend this to all k (my maths isn't great though).

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The original list X has n items. There are 2**n possible sublists, since every item will or will not appear in the resulting sublist: each item adds a bit to the enumeration of the possible sublists. You could view this enumeration of a bitword of n bits.

Since your are only want sublists with k items, you are interested in bitwords with exactly k bits set.

A practical algorithm could pick (or pick not) the first element from X, and then recurse into the rightmost n-1 substring of X, taking into account the accumulated number of chosen items. Since the X list is processed in order, the Y list will also be in order.

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The original list X has n items. There are 2**n possible sublists, since every item will or will not appear in a sublist: each item adds a bit to the enumeration of the possible sublists. You could view this enumeration of a bitword of n bits.

Since your are only want sublists with k items, you are interested in bitwords with exactly k bits set. A practical algorithm could pick (or pick not) the first element from X, and then recurse into the rightmost n-1 substring of X, taking into account the accumulated number of chosen items. Since the X list is processed in order, the Y list will also be in order.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

unsigned pick_k_from_n(char target[], char src[], unsigned k, unsigned n, unsigned done);
unsigned pick_k_from_n(char target[], char src[]
                , unsigned k, unsigned n, unsigned done)
{
unsigned count=0;

if (k>n) return 0;

if (k==0) {
        target[done] = 0;
        puts(target);
        return 1;
        }
if (n > 0) {
        count += pick_k_from_n(target, src+1, k, n-1, done);

        target[done] = *src;
        count += pick_k_from_n(target, src+1, k-1, n-1, done+1);
        }

return count;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {

char result[20];
char *domain = "OmgWtf!";
unsigned cnt ,len, want;
want = 3;

switch (argc) {
default:
case 3:
        domain = argv[2];
case 2:
        sscanf(argv[1], "%u", &want);
case 1:
        break;
        }
len = strlen(domain);

cnt = pick_k_from_n(result, domain, want, len, 0);

fprintf(stderr, "Count=%u\n", cnt);

return 0;
}

Removing the recursion is left as an exercise to the reader. Some output:

plasser@pisbak:~/hiero/src$ ./a.out 3 ABBA
BBA
ABA
ABA
ABB
Count=4
plasser@pisbak:~/hiero/src$
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Oops, that should have been appended to the previous reaction. Sorry! –  wildplasser Apr 13 '12 at 11:16
    
Note that the selected items in the original problem may be repeated. –  timxyz Apr 13 '12 at 11:48
    
"The selected items in Y need not be distinct." I'll add some output. –  wildplasser Apr 13 '12 at 11:51
    
That means they do not have to be distinct. So for input: 123, and k = 2, you may return 11, 12, 13, 22, 23, 33. –  timxyz Apr 13 '12 at 13:27
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