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I want to access a StringBuilder field in a class from a method. Both the field and method are non-static. I've tried this many ways, and it all seems to work whichever way I do it, but I was just wondering what the correct way is. Here's an example of what I mean:

public class ExampleClass {
    private StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    private void call() {
        sb.append("Test"); // I can do it this way
        this.sb.append("Second way"); // or this way
        // does it matter? can someone explain it to me?
    }
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ExampleClass ec = new ExampleClass();
        ec.call();
    }
}

I just don't understand this. I might just be a complete idiot, but what's the correct way to access that field?

Thanks so much,

Paul

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5 Answers 5

There's a difference between these two

sb.append("Test"); // I can do it this way
this.sb.append("Second way"); // or this way

only if you have some other variable in that context also called sb.

For example:

public class ExampleClass {
    private StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    private void call(StringBuilder sb) {
        sb.append("Test"); //refers to the parameter passed to the function
        this.sb.append("Second way"); //refers to your member
    }
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ExampleClass ec = new ExampleClass();
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        ec.call(sb);
    }
}
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In your example, sb and this.sb refer to the same object, which is the field of that instance of ExampleClass. You can use either of them.

In your case I would just use sb as there is no ambiguity. Using this can be useful in the following case:

public void setBuilder(StringBuilder sb) {
    this.sb = sb;
}

this.sb is your class field, sb is the argument of the setBuilder method.

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There is no "Right Way" to do this. I prefer to not use this unless it's ambiguous because, in an IDE, the field is highlighted for me, so I can see that it's resolving to a field. Also, too many this's clutter up the code. Many others prefer to add this because then there is no chance of ambiguity to the reader.

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I'm not sure if there is a standard for this case.

Basically "this" is implicit, and in your case there is no ambiguity (there could be if you had a parameter with the same name, or a protected/public field in a super class).

I usually use "this", but it's a matter of personal taste, I find it easier to quickly see when I'm accessing a class parameter or not.

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both are inherently doing the same thing. the use of this is redundant in this case..

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