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It was given by my colleague, to print values 1 2 3 4 .... 15 15 ..... 4 3 2 1 with only one for loop, no functions, no goto statements and without the use of any conditional statements or ternary operators.

So I employed typecasting to solve it, but it is not an exact solution since 15 is not printed twice.

int main()
{
    int i, j;
    for(i = 1, j = 0;j < 29;j++, i += int(j/15)*-2 + 1)
        cout<<i<<endl;
}

Output: 1 2 3 4 ... 15 14 13 .... 2 1

Any alternative solutions?

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closed as not a real question by Daniel Daranas, Bart, jdv-Jan de Vaan, KillianDS, Bo Persson Apr 11 '12 at 16:00

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

30  
std::cout << "1 2 3 4 .... 15 15 ..... 4 3 2 1"; –  Pubby Apr 11 '12 at 11:46
    
@Pubby: Thats cheating. –  Shubham Apr 11 '12 at 11:48
7  
Shubham thats not cheating, thats known as thinking out of box. That is what the interviewer was looking out for and not some fance bit manipulation or data structure technique :) –  Yavar Apr 11 '12 at 12:32
    
I think we need to relax the function constraint. Without functions, there is no C++. –  Matthieu M. Apr 11 '12 at 12:47
    
I wonder, if there is a way to define such function, that it'll return 0 if its argument is lower than defined constant and 1 if the argument is higher. Integral division might help, but I guess, there is a way without using it. If one may use abs() or sgn(), it's quite easy. –  Spook Apr 11 '12 at 12:49

11 Answers 11

up vote 31 down vote accepted

You can loop from 1 to 30, then use the fact that (i/16) will be "0" for your ascending part and "1" for your descending part.

for (int i = 1; i < 31; i++)
{
    int number = (1-i/16) * i + (i/16) * (31 - i);
    printf("%d ", number);
}
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for (int i=0; i<1; i++)
{
    std::cout << "1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1"
}
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How about this:

std::string first;
std::string second;

for ( int i = 1 ; i <= 15 ; i++ )
{
   std::ostringstream s;
   s << i;
   first += s.str();
   second = s.str() + second;
}

std::cout << first << second;
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Alternative:

static int bla[] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 15, 14, 13, 12, 11, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1};

for (int i = 0; i < 30; i++) 
{        
    printf("%d\n", bla[i]);
}

The good one, it is faster in execution as compare to all ...

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4  
an explanation to the downvote please? –  Default Apr 11 '12 at 11:52
    
I did not downvoted, but I believe, that this is a bypass, not a solution :) –  Spook Apr 11 '12 at 12:33
1  
If the question didn't rule it out and it's not an intended solution then the question is poorly phrased. –  Flexo Apr 15 '12 at 18:26

XOR bit #4 (i.e. j & 0x10) with bits 3:0. You will need to find a way to "repeat" that bit into 4 positions.

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Post working code so I can upvote –  Pubby Apr 11 '12 at 11:50
4  
@Pubby: I'm leaving it as an exercise for the OP (I'm not in the habit of giving complete solutions to homework-like questions!). –  Oli Charlesworth Apr 11 '12 at 11:50
    
@OliCharlesworth: I will need to bit of research for that. Not much easy with using bitwise operations. Any pages to suggest for me to read? –  Shubham Apr 11 '12 at 11:55
    
@Shubham: e.g. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bitwise_operations. In particular, you can take advantage of the fact that 0 ^ 15 = 15, 1 ^ 15 = 14, 2 ^ 15 = 13, ... –  Oli Charlesworth Apr 11 '12 at 11:57
for (int i=1;i<31;++i)
{
  cout<<(((i<<27>>31|i)&(~i<<27>>31|~i))&15)<<" ";
}
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#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    for(int i = 1; i < 31; i++) std::cout << ((i/16)-1)*-i+(i/16)*(i^0x1F) << " ";
    std::cout << std::endl;
}
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const int N = 15;
for(int i = 1; i <= 2 * N; ++i)
    printf("%d ", i + (i > N) * (1 + 2 * (N - i)));
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I have seen many complicated answers, yet no one exploited the symmetry as is.

std::string head = "1";
std::string tail = "1";

for (unsigned i = 2; i != 16; ++i) {
  std::string const elem = boost::lexical_cast<std::string>(i);

  head = head + " " + elem;
  tail = elem + " " + tail;
}

std::cout << head << " " << tail << "\n";

In action at ideone (minus lexical_cast):

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

It works simply, and for any magnitude of the upper bound (as far as your computer as enough memory).

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1  
You used a conditional statement, which is prohibited. –  Spook Apr 11 '12 at 12:47
    
Already posted :P –  Luchian Grigore Apr 11 '12 at 13:17
    
@LuchianGrigore: Your display is incorrect though (no space) :p –  Matthieu M. Apr 11 '12 at 15:12
    
@Spook: corrected :) Stupid list of requirements... –  Matthieu M. Apr 11 '12 at 15:13
    
You're right there. +1 from me. –  Luchian Grigore Apr 11 '12 at 15:16
for (int i = 1; i < 30; i++)
    printf("%d\n", (-((i & 16) >> 4) + 1) * i + ((i & 16) >> 4) * (14 - (i & 15)));
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abs is a function –  Default Apr 11 '12 at 12:03
3  
printf is a function too –  Scroog1 Apr 11 '12 at 12:24
1  
cout << sth = cout.operator<<(sth), so this is function too. How shall we print anything on screen? –  Spook Apr 11 '12 at 12:31
1  
so is main :) the question has some flaws I believe. –  Default Apr 11 '12 at 12:35
2  
The next time I will ask some question I will be completely precise and leaving no loopholes in the question. –  Shubham Apr 11 '12 at 14:22
int main()
{

    for(int i = 15, j = 30, k = 15; i <= 30; i++, j--, k -= 2)
    {
        cout << (j - i) * (k % 2) << endl << (j - i - 1) * (k % 2) << endl;
    }

    return 0;
}

This what I came up with. It goes the other way, ie: 15 -> 0 -> 15. Just more food for thought. Uses mod and k to work out if negative number. I - J meet in the middle. Its by no means perfect and there are some other better answers.

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1  
Subtract the result from 15, it'll return valid sequence :) –  Spook Apr 11 '12 at 18:36
    
me being a numpty... Overall quite an interesting puzzle –  TomTom Apr 11 '12 at 22:04

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