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I just found out about yield return, I seems really nice. I use it in a method like this:

public IEnumerable<ValidationResult> Validate(ValidationContext vc)
{
    if (Name == "Arbitary")
        yield return new ValidationResult("Bad Name.", new[] { "Name" });
    else if (Email == "BadEmail")
        yield return new ValidationResult("Bad Email.", new [] {"Email" });
    // further rules follow.
}

However, I need to change this method to return some ValidationResults from a child method. Without using yield, the code would look like this:

public override IEnumerable<ValidationResult> Validate(ValidationContext vc)
{
    // TryValidateObject fills the ICollection you pass it.
    List<ValidationResult> retVal = new List<ValidationResult>();
    Validator.TryValidateObject(this, vc, retVal, true);

    if (Name == "Arbitary")
        retVal.Add(new ValidationResult("Bad Name.", new[] { "Name" }));
    else if (Email == "BadEmail")
        retVal.Add(new ValidationResult("Bad Email.", new[] { "Email" }));

    return retVal;
}

Is it possible to rewrite this using yield?

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Note that you have misspelled "arbitrary". –  Eric Lippert Apr 11 '12 at 15:05
    
@EricLippert Hah, indeed. I spell this wrong all the time. In this case though its just an example validation rule as I haven't worked out the 'real' ones yet. –  Oliver Apr 11 '12 at 15:06
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Are you looking for this?

public override IEnumerable<ValidationResult> Validate(ValidationContext vc)
{
    // TryValidateObject fills the ICollection you pass it.
    List<ValidationResult> retVal = new List<ValidationResult>();
    Validator.TryValidateObject(this, vc, retVal, true);
    foreach (var item in retVal)
        yield return item;
    if (Name == "Arbitary")
        yield return new ValidationResult("Bad Name.", new[] { "Name" });
    else if (Email == "BadEmail")
        yield return new ValidationResult("Bad Email.", new[] { "Email" });       
}

If so, I believe the first version looks nicer.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this. Is the yield break necessary? –  Oliver Apr 11 '12 at 11:57
    
No, I will delete it. –  Adrian Iftode Apr 11 '12 at 12:00
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Sure. Just use this:

foreach (var item in retVal) {
    yield return item;
}

After that, you could also continue with yield returns. So you could return your retVal after you called the method and then continue as in your first sample. Like this:

public override IEnumerable<ValidationResult> Validate(ValidationContext vc)
{
    List<ValidationResult> retVal = new List<ValidationResult>();
    Validator.TryValidateObject(this, vc, retVal, true);
    foreach (var item in retVal) {
        yield return item;
    }

    if (Name == "Arbitary")
        yield return new ValidationResult("Bad Name.", new[] { "Name" });
    else if (Email == "BadEmail")
        yield return new ValidationResult("Bad Email.", new[] { "Email" });
    //...
}
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The other solutions posted so far are good. Here's another way to solve your problem:

  • Create two sequences
  • concatenate them
  • return the concatenation.

So:

public override IEnumerable<ValidationResult> Validate(ValidationContext vc)
{
  return ResultsFromValidator(vc).Concat(AdditionalResults());
}
private IEnumerable<ValidationResult> ResultsFromValidator(ValidationContext vc)
{
  List<ValidationResult> retVal = new List<ValidationResult>();
  Validator.TryValidateObject(this, vc, retVal, true);
  return retVal;
}
private IEnumerable<ValidationResult> AdditionalResults()
{
  if (Name == "Arbitrary")
    yield return new ValidationResult("Bad Name.", new[] { "Name" });
  ...
}
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