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I'm trying to resolve all the combinations of elements based on a given string.

The string is like this :

String result="1,2,3,###4,5,###6,###7,8,";

The number of element between ### (separated with ,) is not determined and the number of "list" (part separated with ###) is not determined either.

NB : I use number in this example but it can be String too.

And the expected result in this case is a string containing :

String result = "1467, 1468, 1567, 1568, 2467, 2468, 2567, 2568, 3467, 3468, 3567, 3568"

So as you can see the elements in result must start with an element of the first list then the second element must be an element of the second list etc...

From now I made this algorithm that works but it's slow :

    String [] parts = result.split("###");
    if(parts.length>1){
        result="";
        String stack="";
        int i;
        String [] elmts2=null;

        String [] elmts = parts[0].split(",");
        for(String elmt : elmts){               //Browse root elements
            if(elmt.trim().isEmpty())continue;

            /**
             * This array is used to store the next index to use for each row.
             */
            int [] elmtIdxInPart= new int[parts.length];

            //Loop until the root element index change.
            while(elmtIdxInPart[0]==0){

                stack=elmt;

                //Add to the stack an element of each row, chosen by index (elmtIdxInPart)
                for(i=1 ; i<parts.length;i++){
                    if(parts[i].trim().isEmpty() || parts[i].trim().equals(","))continue;
                    String part = parts[i];
                    elmts2 = part.split(",");
                    stack+=elmts2[elmtIdxInPart[i]];
                }
                //rollback i to previous used index
                i--;

                if(elmts2 == null){
                    elmtIdxInPart[0]=elmtIdxInPart[0]+1;
                }
                //Check if all elements in the row have been used.
                else if(elmtIdxInPart[i]+1 >=elmts2.length || elmts2[elmtIdxInPart[i]+1].isEmpty()){

                    //Make evolve previous row that still have unused index
                    int j=1;
                    while(elmtIdxInPart[i-j]+1 >=parts[i-j].split(",").length || 
                            parts[i-j].split(",")[elmtIdxInPart[i-j]+1].isEmpty()){
                        if(j+1>i)break;
                        j++;
                    }
                    int next = elmtIdxInPart[i-j]+1;
                    //Init the next row to 0.
                    for(int k = (i-j)+1 ; k <elmtIdxInPart.length ; k++){
                        elmtIdxInPart[k]=0;
                    }
                    elmtIdxInPart[i-j]=next;
                }
                else{
                    //Make evolve index in current row, init the next row to 0.
                    int next = elmtIdxInPart[i]+1;
                    for(int k = (i+1) ; k <elmtIdxInPart.length ; k++){
                        elmtIdxInPart[k]=0;
                    }
                    elmtIdxInPart[i]=next;
                }
                //Store full stack
                result+=stack+",";
            }
        }
    }
    else{
        result=parts[0];
    }

I'm looking for a more performant algorithm if it's possible. I made it from scratch without thinking about any mathematical algorithm. So I think I made a tricky/slow algo and it can be improved.

Thanks for your suggestions and thanks for trying to understand what I've done :)

EDIT

Using Svinja proposition it divide execution time by 2:

        StringBuilder res = new StringBuilder();
        String input = "1,2,3,###4,5,###6,###7,8,";
        String[] lists = input.split("###");
        int N = lists.length;
        int[] length = new int[N];
        int[] indices = new int[N];
        String[][] element = new String[N][];
        for (int i = 0; i < N; i++){
            element[i] = lists[i].split(",");
            length[i] = element[i].length;
        }

        // solve
        while (true)
        {
            // output current element
            for (int i = 0; i < N; i++){
                res.append(element[i][indices[i]]);
            }
            res.append(",");

            // calculate next element
            int ind = N - 1;
            for (; ind >= 0; ind--)
                if (indices[ind] < length[ind] - 1) break;
            if (ind == -1) break;

            indices[ind]++;
            for (ind++; ind < N; ind++) indices[ind] = 0;
        }
        System.out.println(res);
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is my solution. It's in C# but you should be able to understand it (the important part is the "calculate next element" section):

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // parse the input, this can probably be done more efficiently
        string input = "1,2,3,###4,5,###6,###7,8,";
        string[] lists = input.Replace("###", "#").Split('#');
        int N = lists.Length;
        int[] length = new int[N];
        int[] indices = new int[N];
        for (int i = 0; i < N; i++)
            length[i] = lists[i].Split(',').Length - 1;

        string[][] element = new string[N][];
        for (int i = 0; i < N; i++)
        {
            string[] list = lists[i].Split(',');
            element[i] = new string[length[i]];
            for (int j = 0; j < length[i]; j++)
                element[i][j] = list[j];
        }

        // solve
        while (true)
        {
            // output current element
            for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) Console.Write(element[i][indices[i]]);
            Console.WriteLine(" ");

            // calculate next element
            int ind = N - 1;
            for (; ind >= 0; ind--)
                if (indices[ind] < length[ind] - 1) break;
            if (ind == -1) break;

            indices[ind]++;
            for (ind++; ind < N; ind++) indices[ind] = 0;
        }
    }

Seems kind of similar to your solution. Does this really have bad performance? Seems to me that this is clearly optimal, as the complexity is linear with the size of the output, which is always optimal.

edit: by "similar" I mean that you also seem to do the counting with indexes thing. Your code is too complicated for me to go into after work. :D

My index adjustment works very simply: starting from the right, find the first index we can increase without overflowing, increase it by one, and set all the indexes to its right (if any) to 0. It's basically counting in a number system where each digit is in a different base. Once we can't even increase the first index any more (which means we can't increase any, as we started checking from the right), we're done.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot! I take some time before giving an answer, I made some change in your code to fit Java style, take a look I've edit question. With your solution the execution time is divided by 2, good job! I wait tomorrow before accepting maybe there is an even better solution (but I don't think so ;) ). –  alain.janinm Apr 11 '12 at 18:02

Here is a somewhat different approach:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string input = "1,2,3,###4,5,###6,###7,8,";

        string[] lists = input.Replace("###", "#").Split('#');
        int N = lists.Length;
        int[] length = new int[N];
        string[][] element = new string[N][];
        int outCount = 1;

        // get each string for each position
        for (int i = 0; i < N; i++)
        {
            string list = lists[i];
            // fix the extra comma at the end
            if (list.Substring(list.Length - 1, 1) == ",")
                list = list.Substring(0, list.Length - 1);

            string[] strings = list.Split(',');
            element[i] = strings;
            length[i] = strings.Length;
            outCount *= length[i];
        }
        // prepare the output array
        string[] outstr = new string[outCount];

        // produce all of the individual output strings
        string[] position = new string[N];
        for (int j = 0; j < outCount; j++)
        {
            // working value of j:
            int k = j;

            for (int i = 0; i < N; i++)
            {
                int c = length[i];
                int q = k / c;
                int r = k - (q * c);
                k = q;
                position[i] = element[i][r];
            }
            // combine the chars
            outstr[j] = string.Join("", position);                
        }
        // join all of the strings together
        //(note: joining them all at once is much faster than doing it
        //incrementally, if a mass concatenate facility is available
        string result = string.Join(", ", outstr);            
        Console.Write(result);
    }

I am not a Java programmer either, so I adapted Svinja's c# answer to my algorithm, assuming that you can convert it to Java also. (thanks to Svinja..)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. I adapted it in Java with some optimization but it not as fast as the version I made from Svinja answer (@see edit). The fact is I can't use method join so I still have to concatenate my strings. I think in this case it cost more to do calculations (in nested lookp) than to maintain an array of indexes. Btw thanks again for having try! –  alain.janinm Apr 12 '12 at 8:16
    
OK. I did compare it to Svinja's without the Join and it was still faster, but that was with both in c#. –  RBarryYoung Apr 12 '12 at 14:59
    
Svinja code was good but it miss some optimizations. I've made some change to it in Java. it's interesting to see that the best implementation is not the same with every language! So it seems that calculation in Java are more expensive than in C#. I run the prog 100 000 times, in Java I get an average of 650ms with Svinja code (in edit) and with your code (adapted in Java) I get an average of 800ms. –  alain.janinm Apr 12 '12 at 15:59
    
In either environment, the major expense is still probably the string-handling. The classical way to deal with this is to make an output buffer of sufficient size and then insert/stuff the generated strings into it. Since .Net has immutable strings, we have to use a more indirect method like StringBuilder, or .Join, or a character array as the output buffer (then convert it to a string). Unfortunately, I do not know what the equivalent is for Java. –  RBarryYoung Apr 12 '12 at 16:18
    
Also. Make sure that you've got optimization turned on as this is the kind of code (loops + arrays + integer math) that typically speeds-up a lot between debug-code and released-code. –  RBarryYoung Apr 12 '12 at 16:28

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