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How to pass the param like char * as a reference?

My function uses malloc()

void set(char *buf)
{
    buf = malloc(4*sizeof(char));
    buf = "test";
}

char *str;
set(str);
puts(str);
share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You pass the address of the pointer:

void set(char **buf)
{
    *buf = malloc(5*sizeof(char));
    // 1. don't assign the other string, copy it to the pointer, to avoid memory leaks, using string literal etc.
    // 2. you need to allocate a byte for the null terminator as well
    strcpy(*buf, "test");
}

char *str;
set(&str);
puts(str);
share|improve this answer
2  
4 chars is not enough to hold the string, though :) Maybe sizeof("test") would be better. –  Niklas B. Apr 11 '12 at 13:52
    
I undertood it after posting. See edit. –  MByD Apr 11 '12 at 13:53
2  
sizeof(char) is 1, always. –  Jens Gustedt Apr 11 '12 at 14:57
    
Why not malloc(5) ? it's same as malloc(5 * sizeof(char)), because sizeof(char) = 1 . Unless sizeof(char) is mutable and I don't know.. –  Kakashi Apr 12 '12 at 2:29
    
@NiklasB.: Normally, the people do strlen("test") + 1 instead of sizeof("test") that looks like a good way as well. I will to use it now. –  Kakashi Apr 12 '12 at 2:40

You have to pass it as a pointer to the pointer:

void set(char **buf)
{
    *buf = malloc(5 * sizeof(char));
    strcpy(*buf, "test");
}

Call it like this:

char *str;
set(&str);
puts(str);
free(str);

Note that I have changed the malloc call to allocate five characters, that's because you only allocate for the actual characters, but a string also contains a special terminator character and you need space for that as well.

I also use strcpy to copy the string to the allocated memory. That is because you are overwriting the pointer otherwise, meaning you loose the pointer you allocate and will have a memory leak.

You should also remember to free the pointer when you are done with it, or the memory will stay allocated until the program ends.

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2  
Please mention why you have a "5" instead of a "4". I cringed when I saw the OP. –  D.Shawley Apr 11 '12 at 13:51
    
@D.Shawley Already done. –  Joachim Pileborg Apr 11 '12 at 13:55
    
+1 because mentioned "to free the pointer". –  Kakashi Apr 12 '12 at 2:34

C does not support pass by reference. But you can pass a pointer to your pointer, and set that:

void set(char **buf)
{
    *buf = malloc(5*sizeof(char)); //5, to make room for the 0 terminator
    strcpy(*buf,"test"); //copy the string into the allocated buffer.
}

char *str;
set(&str);
puts(str);
share|improve this answer
    
In computer science, pass by reference means pass an address to a variable. C++ has created a definition that is different from the norm in computer science. That doesn't make the C++ definition the norm, and the question is about C anyhow. Passing by reference in C means passing by pointer. C11 6.2.5 A pointer type may be derived from a function type or an object type, called the referenced type. A pointer type describes an object whose value provides a reference to an entity of the referenced type. A pointer type derived from the referenced type T is sometimes called "pointer to T". –  Lundin Apr 11 '12 at 14:17
    
One usually distinguishes between pass-by-value and pass-by-reference, in which the reference is passed implicitly. Many languages, like C, is said to only support pass-by-value, though you can emulates pass-by-reference by explicitly passing a pointer to whatever you need a reference to.(that pointer is passed by value though) - so I disagree with your definition. –  nos Apr 11 '12 at 14:33
    
Disagree as much as you like, it isn't my definition, it is the C standard's definition of what a reference is in the C language. In the OP's example, buf is a reference to char type. The fact that the reference in itself is passed by value, is another matter. –  Lundin Apr 12 '12 at 14:28

You to pass a pointer to a pointer, char**: there are no references in C.

void set(char** buf)
{
    *buf = malloc(5); /* 5, not 4: one for null terminator. */
    strcpy(buf, "test");
}

Note that:

buf = "test";

does not copy "test" into buf, but points buf to the address of the string literal "test". To copy use strcpy().

Remember to free() returned buffer when no longer required:

char* str;
set(&str);
puts(str);
free(str);
share|improve this answer
    
In computer science, pass by reference means pass an address to a variable. C++ has created a definition that is different from the norm in computer science. That doesn't make the C++ definition the norm, and the question is about C anyhow. Passing by reference in C means passing by pointer. C11 6.2.5 A pointer type may be derived from a function type or an object type, called the referenced type. A pointer type describes an object whose value provides a reference to an entity of the referenced type. A pointer type derived from the referenced type T is sometimes called "pointer to T". –  Lundin Apr 11 '12 at 14:17

C is pass-by-value. There is no pass-by-reference.

share|improve this answer
    
In computer science, pass by reference means pass an address to a variable. C++ has created a definition that is different from the norm in computer science. That doesn't make the C++ definition the norm, and the question is about C anyhow. Passing by reference in C means passing by pointer. C11 6.2.5 A pointer type may be derived from a function type or an object type, called the referenced type. A pointer type describes an object whose value provides a reference to an entity of the referenced type. A pointer type derived from the referenced type T is sometimes called "pointer to T". –  Lundin Apr 11 '12 at 14:14
    
@Lundin Do you have a reference for "In computer science, pass by reference means pass an address to a variable"? AFAIK the term pass by reference and its synonyms has been used in their current meaning since Fortran and Pascal, a long time before C++. –  Joni Apr 11 '12 at 14:37
    
I think we can agree that in general computer science, there is only pass-by-value or pass-by-reference. C and C++ supports a raw version of pass-by-reference called pointers, that allows you modify the actual, reference address if you would like. This feature doesn't stop pointer parameters from being pass-by-reference. In C++ they decided to create an alternative syntax for pass-by-reference, with the C++ reference type. After this, C++ programmers started to believe that the pointer syntax wasn't pass-by-reference any longer. Don't ask me why. -> –  Lundin Apr 12 '12 at 14:51
    
Yes indeed, the pointer in itself is passed by value, it is allocated on the stack/in a register. So what, this is also true for a C++ reference! The resulting machine code is identical. –  Lundin Apr 12 '12 at 14:52
    
@Lundin Re: "I think we can agree that in general computer science, there is only pass-by-value or pass-by-reference." I don't agree; many other (though less common) strategies to pass parameters exist. See e.g. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evaluation_strategy –  Joni Apr 12 '12 at 15:06

C cannot not pass function arguments by reference, C always passes them by value.

From Kernighan & Ritchie:

(K&R 2nd, 1.8 Call by value) "In C all function arguments are passed by "value""

To modify a pointer to T, you can have a pointer to pointer to T as the function argument type.

share|improve this answer
    
In computer science, pass by reference means pass an address to a variable. C++ has created a definition that is different from the norm in computer science. That doesn't make the C++ definition the norm, and the question is about C anyhow. Passing by reference in C means passing by pointer. C11 6.2.5 A pointer type may be derived from a function type or an object type, called the referenced type. A pointer type describes an object whose value provides a reference to an entity of the referenced type. A pointer type derived from the referenced type T is sometimes called "pointer to T". –  Lundin Apr 11 '12 at 14:18
    
I don't agree. Using the wording pass-by-reference in C can only confuse a little more the beginners: there is no reference in C as there is in C++. Contrary to other languages there aren't two (or more) different ways to pass function arguments in C, you can just pass by value; and pointers arguments are passed the same way as any other argument. And I think the C quote in §6.2.5 has nothing to do with pass-by-reference. –  ouah Apr 11 '12 at 15:49
    
by the way for the downvoter, I won't delete this answer as I don't think it deserves a -1 :) –  ouah Apr 11 '12 at 19:29
    
As you can see for yourself in the above normative text cited from the standard, there is indeed something called reference in C. The definition just isn't what you thought it would be and indeed it is confusing, but it is still there. I didn't downvote you, but I don't believe the whole reference debate is doing the OP any good. –  Lundin Apr 12 '12 at 14:37

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