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I have a table that loads new data every day and another table that contains a history of changes to that table. What's the best way to check if any of the data have changed since the last time data was loaded?

For example, I have table @a with some strategies for different countries and table @b tracks the changes made to table @a. I can use a checksum() to hash the fields that can change, and add them to the table if the existing hash is different from the new hash. However, MSDN doesn't think this is a good idea since "collisions" can occur, e.g. two different values map to the same checksum.

MSDN link for checksum http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa258245(v=SQL.80).aspx

Sample code:

declare @a table
(
    ownerid bigint
    ,Strategy varchar(50)
    ,country char(3)
)
insert into @a
select 1,'Long','USA'

insert into @a
select 2,'Short','CAN'

insert into @a
select 3,'Neutral','AUS'

declare @b table
(
    Lastupdated datetime
    ,ownerid bigint
    ,Strategy varchar(50)
    ,country char(3)

)

insert into @b
(
    Lastupdated
    ,ownerid
    ,strategy
    ,country
)
select 
    getdate()
    ,a.ownerid
    ,a.strategy
    ,a.country
from @a a left join @b b
    on a.ownerid=b.ownerid
where
    b.ownerid is null

select * from @b

--get a different timestamp
waitfor delay '00:00:00.1'

--change source data
update @a 
set strategy='Short'
where ownerid=1

--add newly changed data into 
insert into @b
select 
    getdate()
    ,a.ownerid
    ,a.strategy
    ,a.country
from 
    (select *,checksum(strategy,country) as hashval from @a) a 
    left join 
    (select *,checksum(strategy,country) as hashval from @b) b
    on a.ownerid=b.ownerid
where 
    a.hashval<>b.hashval

select * from @b
share|improve this question
1  
Do you have control over the source data? Your best bet is to have a datetime field to track when a record is created and/or modified. Then pull only data with a timestamp that is newer than the data you currently have. Otherwise, you'll need to compare every field in each row to see if anything has changed. –  MatBailie Apr 11 '12 at 13:59
    
If the "import" is fairly simple, it often works out that checking costs more than just overwriting, given you are taking teh new data as gospel. –  Tony Hopkinson Apr 11 '12 at 14:00
1  
please let me know whether Table @b allows more than one record for same ownerid. is ownerid is primary key. –  Romil May 3 '12 at 15:00
    
@Romil - I'm guessing the PK on table @b is going to be a composite of Lastupdated and ownerid but it would be good to get clarification from FisOfFury. –  Tony May 4 '12 at 10:59
    
@Romil, the PK would be a composite of LastUpdated and ownerid. Hope that helps –  FistOfFury May 15 '12 at 19:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How about writing a query using EXCEPT? Just write queries for both tables and then add EXCEPT between them:

(SELECT * FROM table_new) EXCEPT (SELECT * FROM table_old) 

The result will be the entries in table_new that aren't in table_old (i.e. that have been updated or inserted).

Note: To get rows recently deleted from table_old, you can reverse the order of the queries.

share|improve this answer
    
You are assuming there is only one row in table_old for each row in table_new; which would mean the second table is just an exact copy of the first. If there is more than one row then using EXCEPT will not work. –  Tony May 4 '12 at 11:00
    
Rows recently deleted from table_old won't be seen, is that what you mean? I'll make a note. –  newenglander May 4 '12 at 11:11
    
This may be what I was looking for! I had to rework it a bit but will post the code shortly. –  FistOfFury May 15 '12 at 19:18
    
@Tony, I checked this method when 2 rows were updated and both rows were returned from the Except. Thanks! –  FistOfFury May 15 '12 at 19:33

Thanks to @newenglander I was able to use EXCEPT to find the changed row. As @Tony said, I'm not sure how multiple changes will work, but here's the same sample code reworked to use Except instead of CHECKSUM

declare @a table
(
    ownerid bigint
    ,Strategy varchar(50)
    ,country char(3)
)
insert into @a
select 1,'Long','USA'

insert into @a
select 2,'Short','CAN'

insert into @a
select 3,'Neutral','AUS'

declare @b table
(
    Lastupdated datetime
    ,ownerid bigint
    ,Strategy varchar(50)
    ,country char(3)

)

insert into @b
(
    Lastupdated
    ,ownerid
    ,strategy
    ,country
)
select 
    getdate()
    ,a.ownerid
    ,a.strategy
    ,a.country
from @a a left join @b b
    on a.ownerid=b.ownerid
where
    b.ownerid is null

select * from @b

--get a different timestamp
waitfor delay '00:00:00.1'

--change source data
update @a 
set strategy='Short'
where ownerid=1



--add newly changed data using EXCEPT
insert into @b 
select getdate(),
    ownerid,
    strategy,
    country
from 
(
    (
    select 
        ownerid
        ,strategy
        ,country 
    from @a changedtable
    ) 
    EXCEPT 
    (
    select 
        ownerid
        ,strategy
        ,country 
    from @b historicaltable
    )
) x

select * from @b
share|improve this answer
1  
Sorry, the changes were rejected by moderators. Perhaps just try posting the SQL query itself, without the added SQL Server specialties? –  newenglander Jul 17 '12 at 16:30

There is no need to check for changes if you use a different approach to the problem.

On your master table create a trigger for INSERT, UPDATE and DELETE which tracks the changes for you by writing to table @b.

If you search the internet for "SQL audit table" you will find many pages describing the process, for example: Adding simple trigger-based auditing to your SQL Server database

share|improve this answer
    
this is a good solution but not for the problem I am trying to solve. The table with the history isn't just an audit table. I want to add new/changed results to the history table so that I can refer to its state at a given point in time. E.g. if I have a date parameter, I want to get all the latest records as of that date. Audit tables are good for tracking the history but not really for getting the state of the table at a particular date. –  FistOfFury May 15 '12 at 19:12
    
@FistOfFury - that doesnt seem right. I use audit tables for point-in-time reporting all the time. What in particular makes it unsuitable to you? (There are several SQL patterns that make this straight forward, especially with SQL Server's window functions and CTEs.) –  MatBailie May 16 '12 at 6:55
    
@Dems In order to get the state of a table at a given point in time, I would have to re-create all the changes to the table using the audit table. E.g., if i want to find out what the value to a field was a year ago, i would have to back out the value using the current state and all the previous states. Using a history table, I'm able to get the relevant rows with a simple select * from table where max(timestamp) < mydateparameter. It's cleaner, more intuitive, and easier to trace by avoiding an audit table approach. I'm using SQL 2005, so I can't use the CHANGETABLE from sql 2008. –  FistOfFury May 31 '12 at 21:35

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