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I use 3rd party API. According to its specification the following

  byte[] timestamp = new byte[] {185, 253, 177, 161, 51, 1}

represents Number of milliseconds from Jan 1, 1970 when the message was generated for transmission

The issue is that I don't know how it could be translated into DateTime.

I've tried

DateTime Epoch = new DateTime(1970, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, DateTimeKind.Utc);
long milliseconds = BitConverter.ToUInt32(timestamp, 0);
var result =  Epoch + TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(milliseconds);

The result is {2/1/1970 12:00:00 AM}, but year 2012 is expected.

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Does timestamp uses little endian, or native endian? –  CodesInChaos Apr 11 '12 at 14:18
    
All data uses the little-endian byte ordering. –  Andrei Schneider Apr 11 '12 at 14:21
    
Is the expected result really 2012? I get 14.11.2011 10:49:16 –  CodesInChaos Apr 11 '12 at 14:22
    
You are using BitConverter.ToUInt32() which certainly won't be helping...that will only look at bytes [0...3] (i.e. 32 bits) –  KingCronus Apr 11 '12 at 14:30
    
How does this API handle dates before the start of the epoch? Does it thread the MSB of the last byte as a sign bit? Or does it simply not support such dates? –  CodesInChaos Apr 11 '12 at 14:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I assume timestamp uses little endian format. I also left out parameter validation.

long GetLongLE(byte[] buffer,int startIndex,int count)
{
  long result=0;
  long multiplier=1;
  for(int i=0;i<count;i++)
  {
    result += buffer[startIndex+i]*multiplier;
    multiplier *= 256;
  }
  return result;
}

long milliseconds = GetLongLE(timestamp, 0, 6);
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There's a thing called BitConverter.ToInt64 –  atornblad Apr 11 '12 at 14:13
1  
@atornblad 1) You'd need to pad the array. 2) BitConverter.ToInt64 uses native endianness. I assume the data he receives is little endian. –  CodesInChaos Apr 11 '12 at 14:15
        byte[] timestamp = new byte[] { 185, 253, 177, 161, 51, 1, 0, 0, };
        DateTime Epoch = new DateTime(1970, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, DateTimeKind.Utc);
        ulong milliseconds = BitConverter.ToUInt64(timestamp, 0);
        var result = Epoch + TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(milliseconds);

Result is 11/14/2011

Adding padding code special for CodeInChaos:

    byte[] oldStamp = new byte[] { 185, 253, 177, 161, 51, 1 };
    byte[] newStamp = new byte[sizeof(UInt64)];
    Array.Copy(oldStamp, newStamp, oldStamp.Length);

For running on big-endian machines :

if (!BitConverter.IsLittleEndian)
{
    newStamp = newStamp.Reverse().ToArray();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Does not fit the updated question. You should also include the code that adds the padding. –  CodesInChaos Apr 11 '12 at 14:24
    
Now your code doesn't work at all on big endian systems, since your parsing assumes native endian, and the padding assumes litte endian. –  CodesInChaos Apr 11 '12 at 14:30
    
Yes, and that's exactly why BitConverter.ToUInt64 as you use it is broken, since it assumes native endianness. –  CodesInChaos Apr 11 '12 at 14:35
    
You can reverse input data if running on big endian machine. see my edit. But I think that OP can manually do such things –  zabulus Apr 11 '12 at 14:35
1  
It's not very C#-ish but you can do Array.Resize(ref timestamp, 8) to pad the original byte array. –  Scroog1 Apr 11 '12 at 14:42

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