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Translation module

Introduction

My code is working so far, but I don't know if this is the proper way of implementing what I want. I have a small function to translate strings on my webpage. If I call it with a number it searches the id in one table and only displays it if it's intended for that page. If I call it with a string, it searches the string in another table and, if the string doesn't exist, the function prints the string passed replacing '_' with spaces with a warning.

There are 2 things I'd like to know if are implemented correctly (as stated, they work but I'm not sure if they're a good idea). But first the code.

The code

// Function to output language strings.
function text($Id)
    {
    // Already defined and tested that are valid (sql injection avoided also)
    global $Lang;
    global $FullUrl;

    if (is_int($Id))    // If a number is being passed
        {
        $results = mysql_query("SELECT * FROM translations WHERE id='$Id' AND page='$FullUrl'") or die ('Could not query:' . mysql_error());
        $row = mysql_fetch_assoc($results);
        if (!empty($row[$Lang])) echo $row[$Lang];  // If there is some, echo it
        else error($FullUrl,$Lang); // Else, calls error function
        }

    else    // If a string is being passed
        {
        $results = mysql_query("SELECT * FROM htranslations WHERE keyword='$Id'") or die ('Could not query:' . mysql_error());
        $row = mysql_fetch_assoc($results);
        if (!empty($row[$Lang])) echo $row[$Lang];  // If it exists in the table, echo it
        else    // Else (it doesn't exist)
            {
            $NewId = str_replace("_", " ", $Id);    // Replace the "_" with " "
            echo "<span style='color: red;' title='";   // Set a red color (warning)
            text(Wrong_sentence);   // Call this function and echo "This sentence could be wrong"
            echo "'>".$NewId."</span>"; // Echo the passed string with spaces
            error($FullUrl,$Lang,$Id);
            }
        }
    }

1. Is it better to echo inside or outside the function?

I've already read this question and I don't intend to manipulate the strings furthermore. So, from that post, I'm guessing that the best idea is to do as I already did, echoing inside the function, but I'd like to know your opinion for this particular case as I'm still not sure. Would it be better to return the value and echo that value or echo it from the function? Why? My question is focused in performance and making the code friendly.

2. Is dangerous to call this function from inside the function?

As you can see, in one of the last lines I wrote text(Wrong_sentence);. I know that you can call a function from another, but can you call a function FROM that same function? I'm worried about it entering an infinite loop of calling itself, for example, if the table keyword Wrong_sentence got deleted or modified. Also, I'm not aware of other security consequences that could be there.

Any other kind of feedback on the code would be happily welcome!!

share|improve this question
    
I would rather post this to codereview.stackexchange.com. – Juhana Apr 11 '12 at 14:55
    
I actually started writing the question there, but since it's a specific programming problem I thought this would be better, and since it could be classified under Tools, best practices, improving, or conducting code reviews I didn't ask it there. I had to read both faq several times thought. – Francisco Presencia Apr 11 '12 at 14:59
    
1: Use descriptive titles. "I have a question" is an awful title. 2: Ask one question per question. – meagar Apr 11 '12 at 15:06
3  
Short answers: 1. Read about separation of concerns. Mixing presentation, business logic and data access all together is a maintenance nightmare. 2. Yes, you can and that's called recursion. Recursion can be beautiful, or it can be bad if you don't watch out for infinite recursion as you noted. Recursive calls have no more security concerns than any other function call. – NullUserException Apr 11 '12 at 15:08
    
meagar, sorry and thanks for pointing it out. I thought that since they are so related and for the same code it'd be fine. @NullUserException, thank you for your answer, I don't completely understand the Separation of Concerns but I'll look into it harder. – Francisco Presencia Apr 11 '12 at 17:35
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Separation of concerns is the first part to take care of. That is just an essential.

Generally what you made is a global function which makes sense for this. It should at least be available in views. Though I have some concerns:

  1. Globals: You use global variables, just don't like that. Even worse you don't even check what's in there. If you eventually start using them make sure to check them right before you use them. For example it could be overwritten or whatever which creates vague errors.

  2. Separation of concerns: This function should do nothing more than ask a model for a text. That's it. That model could return false/void/error or just the text. Dealing with the

  3. Location of this function: In general this is called a Helper in MVC terms so it might be interesting taking a look at Helpers. For example in CakePHP like this: http://book.cakephp.org/2.0/en/views/helpers.html This way you style it more in a standard way and also you use the standard which makes it easy to find for other developers. If I see a helper I know where to look for it, a global function could be defined in any location of the system.

  4. Never echo: The echo is just not nice, we prefer to put them only directly into views when we need them. Why? Because it makes debugging the result easier and we need only one approach for but using them in a variable and in a echo.

    echo text(123);

It doesn't take much more code or something but it generates a standard. For example if you need it in a variable or other method:

echo strtotupper(text(123));

If you are testing you need the same, you need a response from the function. Clearly it is possible to test the echo but a return just works much better.

  1. Combination of URL and text: A piece of text belongs to other content. The URL links to that content but does not seem to be the right link. For example take a page with a title with an typo in the URL. The URL get's fixed but your texts are not linked anymore.

  2. Combination of 2 features in one function: When you start unit-testing code you will notice why this creates more complexity issues. You have 2 functions, getTextById and getTextByKeyword. Essentially you see the issue already here:

    "SELECT * FROM htranslations WHERE keyword='$Id'"

You are looking up an $Id which seems to be a keyword. Error prone code. Pick a flavor and stick with it. Generally I dislike hardcoded id's since they don't say anything. So I would suggest to use something like:

text('CONTACT_ADDRESS')

That sort of tags are readable (which is important in the view and it makes sense. For example a bad one:

<p><?php text(24234); ?></p>
<p><?php text(96985); ?></p>

You have no clue what it is. But if I wrote this in the view it would be totally clear:

<p><?php text('ORGANISATION_INTRODUCTION'); ?></p>
<p><?php text('ORGANISATION_FOUNDERS'); ?></p>

Those are 2 pieces of text but now you know which ones. Also you know where you can find them if you would see the page itself. As you see those simple examples use a page prefix but clearly there could also be global texts. Like a text in a sidebar. Depending on your needs there are many options here. You could even add the page name automatically etc.

  1. Abuse of MySQL functions: Just don't do this anymore:

    $results = mysql_query("SELECT * FROM htranslations WHERE keyword='$Id'") or die ('Could not query:' . mysql_error());

Just create some PDO statement or something else secure and make sure that you catch errors, validate inputs etc. So many hacks have been seen because of this kind of issues.

  1. Already available solutions: You are not the first one to translate texts. So why don't you take a look at for example already available systems like Framework which support multi-language or http://www.gnu.org/software/gettext/. There are already so many tricks, why develop a new one?

  2. Recursive: If you call you own function currently with the wrong key for the error of not found it will call again and again and again. Just not very nice. Split your error handling (this is a development error) to a separate class. That can take care of it's own error handling. this is also separation of concerns.

Clearly you can add much more feedback but think this gives you a quite complete start to re-think your approach. There is not just one good solution but for sure you can improve much on this first concept.

share|improve this answer
    
Really long and complete answer, thank you. About your 1st concerns, the value of the variables is already checked. About the rest of the answer, there are many many things to learn, thank you for this. Also, it answers both questions comprehensively. Again, thank you for your answer, I'll 'study' it properly and improve my code. – Francisco Presencia Apr 11 '12 at 16:14
    
thanks for the fast response, hope it supports you! About the 1st concern: No it is not. I'll explain you why: Just somewhere in one of your scripts $FullUrl='newpageurl/anotherurl.newextension'; For example in a new page script. At that point you had checked the variable at some point but now it becomes invalid and can give issues. So just don't use them, please ;) – Luc Franken Apr 11 '12 at 17:23
    
Yes, some things are too advanced for me right now but I'm studying a lot. The $FullUrl is not actually a 'full url'. It's just the current directory. There's some code before that checks and deletes from $FullUrl everything after every '.' and every '?' and also the file name. So, for the page example.com/path/to/file.php?var=5&varb=68, $FullUrl would be /path/to/ – Francisco Presencia Apr 11 '12 at 17:32
    
Went back to see old questions and realized how I'm doing almost all of your recommendations intuitively now (: The only two I'm not following is the catch for this [now] class (don't need/want it specifically for this class) and the already available solutions. Here is the final version of it. – Francisco Presencia Jan 9 '13 at 14:14
    
Sounds like good improvements and developments. Also good to see you posted it on GitHub, it might improve a lot more from that point. – Luc Franken Jan 9 '13 at 19:32

Since the second question is clear from other answers and comments, I will answer the first one (although I think it's odd to answer myself, I found a more fitting answer for my question). I can have both, echoing inside OR outside at the same time. Here is the code:

// Function to output language strings.
function text($Id)
    {
    // Already defined and tested that are valid (sql injection avoided also)
    global $Lang;
    global $FullUrl;

    $numargs = func_num_args(); // Get the number of arguments that are being passed.
    if ($numargs == 2)  // If there are actually two
        $Var=func_get_arg(1);   // Set $Var with the second value (1).

    if (is_int($Id))    // If a number is being passed
        {
        $results = mysql_query("SELECT * FROM translations WHERE id='$Id' AND page='$FullUrl'") or die ('Could not query:' . mysql_error());
        $row = mysql_fetch_assoc($results);
        if (!empty($row[$Lang]) && !isset($Var)) echo $row[$Lang];  // If there is some, echo it
    elseif ($Var==1) return $row[$Lang];
        else error($FullUrl,$Lang); // Else, calls error function
        }

    else    // If a string is being passed
        {
        $results = mysql_query("SELECT * FROM htranslations WHERE keyword='$Id'") or die ('Could not query:' . mysql_error());
        $row = mysql_fetch_assoc($results);
        if (!empty($row[$Lang]) && !isset($Var)) echo $row[$Lang];  // If it exists in the table, echo it
        elseif (!empty($row[$Lang]) && isset($Var)) return $row[$Lang];
        else    // Else (it doesn't exist)
            {
            $NewId = str_replace("_", " ", $Id);    // Replace the "_" with " "
            echo "<span style='color: red;' title='";   // Set a red color (warning)
            text(Wrong_sentence);   // Call this function and echo "This sentence could be wrong"
            echo "'>".$NewId."</span>"; // Echo the passed string with spaces
            error($FullUrl,$Lang,$Id);
            }
        }
    }

So, if I want just to ECHO some text, I would write tex(56), text(Existing_string) or text(Non_existing_string). But to RETURN those same texts as variables, I just need to write tex(56,1), text(Existing_string,1) or "Non existing string". Note that, to use "Non existing string" I don't need to pass it and return itself.

There are still MANY problems with that code but I'm learning and improving it as you can see. So far, this code works perfectly fine.

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