Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have created a method of determining whether two strings are sorted. All of my test cases work except for one. The code is below.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        bool test1 = isSorted("test1", "test2");
        bool test2 = isSorted("4576", "4567");
        bool test3 = isSorted("test10", "test11");
        bool test4 = isSorted("abdc", "abcd");
    }

    public static bool isSorted(string MyFirstString, string MySecondString)
    {
        string MyFirstCutString = MyFirstString.ToLower();
        string MySecondCutString = MySecondString.ToLower();

        if (MyFirstString.Length > MySecondString.Length)
            MyFirstCutString = MyFirstCutString.Substring(0, MySecondString.Length);
        else if (MySecondString.Length > MyFirstString.Length)
            MySecondCutString = MySecondCutString.Substring(0, MyFirstCutString.Length);

        for (int i = 0; i < MyFirstCutString.Length; i++)
        {
            if (getNumberic(MyFirstCutString[i]) > getNumberic(MySecondCutString[i]))
                return false;
        }

        return true;
    }

    public static int getNumberic(char myLetter)
    {
        switch (myLetter)
        {
            case 'a':
                return 1;
            case 'b':
                return 2;
            case 'c':
                return 3;
            case 'd':
                return 4;
            case 'e':
                return 5;
            case 'f':
                return 6;
            case 'g':
                return 7;
            case 'h':
                return 8;
            case 'i':
                return 9;
            case 'j':
                return 10;
            case 'k':
                return 11;
            case 'l':
                return 12;
            case 'm':
                return 13;
            case 'n':
                return 14;
            case 'o':
                return 15;
            case 'p':
                return 16;
            case 'q':
                return 17;
            case 'r':
                return 18;
            case 's':
                return 19;
            case 't':
                return 20;
            case 'u':
                return 21;
            case 'v':
                return 22;
            case 'w':
                return 23;
            case 'x':
                return 24;
            case 'y':
                return 25;
            case 'z':
                return 26;
            case 'O':
                return 27;
            case '1':
                return 28;
            case '2':
                return 29;
            case '3':
                return 30;
            case '4':
                return 31;
            case '5':
                return 32;
            case '6':
                return 33;
            case '7':
                return 34;
            case '8':
                return 35;
            case '9':
                return 36;
            default:
                return 1000;
        }
    }
}

The results of the tests are as follows:

test1 result is true
test2 result is false
test3 result is false (NOT GOOD!)
test4 result is true

I do not see any flaws in my logic.

share|improve this question
4  
Is this homework? If not, why aren't you using string.Compare? –  Mr Lister Apr 11 '12 at 15:03
    
A few more test cases, for which I'm not sure if they behave as you like: Both "A","B" and "B","A" are considered sorted. And both "ab","a" and "a","ab" are considered sorted. –  CodesInChaos Apr 11 '12 at 15:04
    
Using your code test4 result is false, not true as you write... Is this what you need? –  Marco Apr 11 '12 at 15:15
    
@Marco - you are correct sir, I made a mistake when I was retyping the results. –  Raging Dave Apr 11 '12 at 20:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You mixed up O and 0 in the switch. This means 0 gets the numeric value 1000, and sorts behind 1.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it works now. –  Raging Dave Apr 11 '12 at 20:40

Instead of 0 you have O in the getNumberic method.

By the way, I would rewrite it at least like this:

    public static int getNumberic( char c )
    {
        if( c >= 'a' && c <= 'z' )
        {
            return c - 'a';
        }
        else if( c >= '0' && c <= '9' )
        {
            return 'z' + c - '0';
        }
        else
        {
            return 1000;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Off by 1 for digits. –  CodesInChaos Apr 11 '12 at 15:05
    
I know. But doesn't matter for sorting purposes. –  Shedal Apr 11 '12 at 15:06
    
certainly it does. isSorted("zb", "0a") –  CodesInChaos Apr 11 '12 at 15:10
    
Ok, I indeed have a "bug", but not the one you think I have. The one you're keeping in mind would be there if I had 'z' - 'a' + c - '0'. But my code actually works fine ;-) –  Shedal Apr 11 '12 at 15:12
    
Hmm right. Still very confusing code. –  CodesInChaos Apr 11 '12 at 15:14

Not the answer you search, but what do you think about this?

public bool isSorted(string s1, string s2)
{
    return s1.ToLower().CompareTo(s2.ToLower()) < 0;
}

or

public bool isSorted(string s1, string s2)
{
    return String.Compare(s1, s2, true) < 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc165449.aspx says to avoid string.CompareTo, but to use string.Compare instead. –  Mr Lister Apr 11 '12 at 15:07
    
@MrLister: thanks, you're right. I've just updated my answer. I don't understand why OP needs those long self-written functions... What do you think? –  Marco Apr 11 '12 at 15:10
    
@Marco He probably wants a custom sort order. In particular ASCII digits after lowercase ASCII letters, and all other characters after that. –  CodesInChaos Apr 11 '12 at 15:13
    
@Marco I think if the OP is learning about sorting methods, writing compare functions yourself is a good method of getting to understand these things. The OP's example would need 127 cases in the switch for ASCII though, and over a million cases for Unicode. –  Mr Lister Apr 11 '12 at 15:16
    
@CodeInChaos: don't know. I've already upvoted your answer because is the correct one, but I think to leave my answer as I think it's not wrong :) –  Marco Apr 11 '12 at 15:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.