Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have done my homework and studied other responses on this topic but none address my particular issue.

I want to remove the io library completely and the os only partially (let's say i want to keep os.clock() and others)

How can I achieve this only from the C API.

Due to the nature of the project I am not allowed to modify the Lua headers and the scripts that will be sent to me. These are not under my control. The only thing I can modify is the interpreter.

doing something like this:

lua_pushnil(state_pointer);
lua_setglobal(state_pointer, "os.execute");

won't help much because in the script the user can call os = require('os') and get all the functions back

I am not allowed to disable the require function so this makes things harder.

Any ideas?

PS:More of a curiosity: if I do something like

luaopen_base(L);
luaopen_table(L);
luaopen_string(L);
luaopen_math(L);
luaopen_loadlib(L); (basically i'm loading every library by hand except os and io)

instead of

luaL_openlibs(L); (this loads all the libraries)

would os = require('os') or io = require('io') still work?


@Nicol Bolas don't know if i'm doing something wrong but os = require('os') & require('io') just brings everything back.

my code:

luaL_openlibs(LuaInstance);     /* load the libs        */ 
lua_pushnil(LuaInstance);
lua_setglobal(LuaInstance, "io");
lua_pushnil(LuaInstance);
lua_setglobal(LuaInstance, "os.execute");
lua_pushnil(LuaInstance);
lua_setglobal(LuaInstance, "os.rename");
lua_pushnil(LuaInstance);
lua_setglobal(LuaInstance, "os.remove");
lua_pushnil(LuaInstance);
lua_setglobal(LuaInstance, "os.exit");

In my script i just do a

os = require('os')
io = require('io')

after this os functions and io functions all work. os.exit still closes my app and io.write works as usual

share|improve this question
    
"the user can call os = require('os') and get all the functions back" - Did you try it? Doesn't seem to me like it would work. –  interjay Apr 11 '12 at 15:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

won't help much because in the script the user can call os = require('os') and get all the functions back

No, it won't. Calling require(os) will simply return the os table. The same table you will have modified. So there's no problem.

So just modify the table after you register it. It will work, and it's really easy to test that it does.

luaopen_base(L);

Be advised: luaopen_* are not regular C functions. They are Lua C functions; they're functions that expect to be called via the standard Lua mechanisms. You can't call them directly from C.

In Lua 5.1, you must use push them on the stack and use lua_pcall or similar calling functions to call them. In Lua 5.2, you should use luaL_requiref, which will put their tables into the Lua require registry.


Your code has two problems. First:

lua_setglobal(LuaInstance, "io");
lua_pushnil(LuaInstance);

This does not actually change the table. It simply removes the reference to the table. If you want to change the table itself, then you must change the table. You have to get the io table and modify it. Walk the table and set each value in it to nil. Simply replacing the contents of the global variable called io will do nothing.

However, if you want to prevent io from being used entirely, you shouldn't register it to begin with.

The second problem is this:

lua_pushnil(LuaInstance);
lua_setglobal(LuaInstance, "os.execute");

This modifies the value of the global table who's key is ["os.execute"]. It is the equivalent of this Lua code:

_G["os.execute"] = nil

This is not the same as:

os.execute = nil;

When you use os.execute in Lua, that means to take the global table (_G), find the value with the key named "os" and find the "execute" key within the table fetched from "os".

When you do _G["os.execute"], what you're saying is to take the global table and find the value with the key named "os.execute".

See the difference?

What you want to do is get the table stored in the global variable os and modify that table. You can't use lua_setglobal, because the members of the os table are not globals; they're members of a table. Yes, the table that they are stored in just so happens to be a global. But you can't modify the members of a table stored in a global with lua_setglobal.

You have to do this:

lua_getglobal(L, "os");
lua_pushnil(L);
lua_setfield(L, -2, "execute");
lua_pushnil(L);
lua_setfield(L, -2, "rename");
lua_pushnil(L);
lua_setfield(L, -2, "remove");
lua_pushnil(L);
lua_setfield(L, -2, "exit");
lua_pop(L, 1);
share|improve this answer
    
Note that the following is valid Lua 5.1 code: local os = require("os") –  Ignacio Apr 11 '12 at 17:26
    
@Ignacio: Fixed. –  Nicol Bolas Apr 11 '12 at 17:36
    
@Nicol Bolas - please take a look on my edited question. Maybe i'm doing something wrong –  FMMirel Apr 12 '12 at 10:30
    
@FMirel: You're removing the stuff wrong. See my edit. –  Nicol Bolas Apr 12 '12 at 17:42
    
@Nicol Bolas - Thank you very much kind sir ^^ This pretty much solves my problems. A minor comment: lua_setfield(L, -1, "execute"); crashes my interpreter, however I changed -1 with 1 in all the calls and it now works. Another solution which surfaced recently is to just write my own luaopen_os function and load only the functions i'm interested in. I think i'm going to go with your solution because I like it more :). Thanks again! –  FMMirel Apr 13 '12 at 12:45

I'd suggest using a sandbox. See "How to create a secure Lua sandbox".

For require, make your own wrapper that validates the parameters before calling the real version, and only include your wrapper in the sandbox.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.