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I'm writing an implementation of a min-heap in C as part of Dijkstra's Algorithm. I've got all of the specifics down and my test program passes valgrind tests, but it allocates ridiculous amounts of memory in the process. The final test is on a grid of INT_MAX by INT_MAX (coordinates are just integers), and I get SIGXCPU errors when I test. Even when I just insert 16k positions into the queue then delete everything, it still takes a very long time and allocates over 8 MB. When I run it on the huge grid test cases, it can get up to 500 MB before I quit manually. What could be going on? Here is part of my code:

struct position {
    int x;
    int y
};

typedef struct elt {
    int priority;
    int distance;
    struct position p;
} *Elt;

typedef struct heap {
    int size;
    int capacity;
    Elt *elts;
} *Heap;

void heap_insert(Heap h, Elt e, int *counter) {
    if(h->capacity < (h->size + 2)) {
        h->elts = realloc(h->elts, h->capacity * sizeof(Elt) * 2);
        h->capacity *= 2;
    }
    h->elts[h->size] = malloc(sizeof(*Elt));
    elt_assign(h->elts[h->size], e);
    h->size++;
    heapify(h->size, h->elts);
    *counter = *counter + 1;
}

All of my other functions do memory management one-time, in-function, or not at all. The initial size in this case was 64, but I got the same effect starting at 1024. I also tried limiting the size of the queue, to no avail. I'm pretty sure it's not my heapifying code, but this is it just in case

static void floatDown(int n, Elt *a, int pos) {
    Elt x = malloc(sizeof(struct elt));
    elt_assign(x, a[pos]);
    for(;;) {
        if(Child(pos, 1) < n && a[Child(pos, 1)]->priority < a[Child(pos, 0)]->priority) {
            if(a[Child(pos, 1)]->priority < x->priority) {
                elt_assign(a[pos], a[Child(pos, 1)]);
                pos = Child(pos, 1);
            } else {
                break;
            }
        } else if(Child(pos, 0) < n && a[Child(pos, 0)]->priority < x->priority) {
            elt_assign(a[pos], a[Child(pos, 0)]);
            pos = Child(pos, 0);
        } else {
            break;
        }
    }
    elt_assign(a[pos], x);
    free(x);
}

static void heapify(int n, Elt *a) {
    for(int i = n - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
        floatDown(n, a, i);
    }
}

Any help would be much appreciated.

share|improve this question
1  
I get a feeling that the elt_assign method would come in handy here, too. –  Makoto Apr 11 '12 at 16:09
    
I agree to Makoto, as for the code you posted no leaks are obvious. –  alk Apr 11 '12 at 16:26
    
You say "it allocates ridiculous amounts of memory in the process". How much is it allocating? There may be some insight from printing out the values returned by malloc and realloc. (I'd make wrapper functions myMalloc and myRealloc). It might be that memory is fragmented by the Elt x = malloc... at the start of floatdown, so I am wondering if each realloc in heap_insert is allocating a brand new piece of memory in some inefficient way. Also time each malloc and realloc, and print the time, maybe show exponential slowdown. Replace Elt x = malloc with typedef struct elt e = a[pos]; –  gbulmer Apr 11 '12 at 19:19
    
I omitted the elt_assign function because I already had tons of code in the question, but it's just e->p.x = temp->p.x, etc. Thanks gbulmer, I'll try both of those. I'm fairly confident I have exponential slowdown from running 2^x insertions for 10≤x≤16. At 16 it's unbearably slow. I didn't mean that each alloc allocates more memory than makes sense, but that if I insert 8000 Elts into the heap, valgrind will report that I allocated 8 MB over half a million allocations (all freed, but still, that's too much). Also, in your last suggestion why should the typedef be there? –  jclancy Apr 11 '12 at 19:49
    
@jclancy - sorry, I mis-copy+paste'd; typedef struct elt e = a[pos]; should have been struct elt e = a[pos];. Changing the Elt x = malloc... in floatDown to struct elt e = a[pos]; may significantly reduce the amount of space malloc'ed & free'd; if floatdown is called (N.log N) times, that is quite a lot of malloc+free calls. –  gbulmer Apr 11 '12 at 22:11
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1 Answer

This is my working theory. I am willing to discover I am wrong, but without the rest of the code, I can't instrument, run and test it.

The indirection of ... struct heap { ... Elt *elts; } ... when typedef struct elt {...} *Elt; is saving the cost of copying 4 ints and replacing it with copying 1 pointer, but copying is fast, and it only happens log2(N) times.

Instead, every struct elt is malloc'd individually. Without digging around to find the actual size of a malloc'd block, we can estimate that, on average that will waste N/2 sizeof(struct elt) (actually, I think it is worse on my machine).

It may also create discontinuous blocks of memory (by putting small blocks between larger blocks), so that realloc must always allocate a bigger block, so it would be harder to reuse previous blocks. In this specific case, I don't think that matters as much as the waste due to internal fragmentation, or the large number of calls of malloc.

It might also create a 'cache buster'. The actual values are being spread throughout memory, and a cache line is relatively sparse because of the internal fragmentation of the malloc'd struct elt blocks.

So Replace:

typedef struct elt {
    int priority;
    int distance;
    struct position p;
} *Elt;

typedef struct heap {
    int size;
    int capacity;
    Elt *elts;
} *Heap;

with

typedef struct elt {
    int priority;
    int distance;
    struct position p;
} Elt;    // no longer a pointer

typedef struct heap {
    int size;
    int capacity;
    Elt *elts;
} *Heap;

and change:

void heap_insert(Heap h, Elt e, int *counter) {
    if(h->capacity < (h->size + 2)) {
        h->elts = realloc(h->elts, h->capacity * sizeof(Elt) * 2);
        h->capacity *= 2;
    }
    h->elts[h->size] = malloc(sizeof(*Elt));
    elt_assign(h->elts[h->size], e);
    h->size++;
    heapify(h->size, h->elts);
    *counter = *counter + 1;
}

to

void heap_insert(Heap h, Elt e, int *counter) {
    if(h->capacity < (h->size + 2)) {
        h->elts = realloc(h->elts, h->capacity * sizeof(Elt) * 2);
        h->capacity *= 2;
    }
    h->elts[h->size] = e;  // no longer need to malloc
    h->size++;
    heapify(h->size, h->elts);
    *counter = *counter + 1;
}

So the amount of memory malloc'd/realloc'd to hold the heap should be roughly 2 * N * sizeof(struct elt). The function/macro elt_assign can likely be changed to hide other changes.

Then reduce the amount of malloc'ing further by changing:

static void floatDown(int n, Elt *a, int pos) {
    Elt x = malloc(sizeof(struct elt));
    elt_assign(x, a[pos]);
...
    elt_assign(a[pos], x);
    free(x);
}

to

static void floatDown(int n, Elt *a, int pos) {
    Elt x = a[pos];
...
    a[pos] = x;
}

That should further reduce the amount of memory malloc'ed and free'd.

Essentially, there should only be (approximately) log2(N) calls of realloc. There may also be a better chance that realloc just extends the existing block rather than copies.


Edit:

There is a bigger problem in heap_insert than memory allocation:

void heap_insert(Heap h, Elt e, int *counter) {
    ...
    heapify(h->size, h->elts);
    ...
}

heapify is called for every element inserted into the heap, i.e. heapify is called N times. heapify is:

static void heapify(int n, Elt *a) {
    for(int i = n - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
        floatDown(n, a, i);
    }
}

That calls floatdown on every element in the heap so far, for each element inserted. So heap_insert has run-time approximately (N^2)/2 (i.e. O(N^2)) run time.

I believe heap_insert should be using floatDown for each element it adds to the heap, not heapify.

share|improve this answer
    
@wildplasser - I don't like typedef's which hide pointers, when the code needs to deal with the pointer. I don't like things like Elt x = malloc(sizeof(struct elt));. I prefer the pointer to be explicit; Elt* x = malloc(sizeof(Elt)); makes immediate sense (to me). Similarly, I'd change typedef struct heap { ... } *Heap; to typedef struct heap { ... } Heap; so that code like void heap_insert(Heap h, ...) { if(h->capacity < (h->size + 2)) { h->elts = ... becomes void heap_insert(Heap* h, ...) { if(h->capacity < (h->size + 2)) { h->elts = ... which I find more obvious. –  gbulmer Apr 12 '12 at 0:59
    
OK, thanks, I made the modifications and will test tomorrow. Can you do structure assignment like that, with just an equals sign, and not do everything individually? –  jclancy Apr 12 '12 at 4:06
    
@jclancy - unless you are using an extremely old (pre-1990) C compiler, yes, structure assignment works. Even if you don't like my suggested changes, I think the important part is to remove the large number of malloc calls; I think they are causing a lot of the problems you describe. So please try the changes. I think it will make a big difference. If it does not improve, please report your findings. –  gbulmer Apr 12 '12 at 4:15
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