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I'd like to build an efficient Python iterator/generator that yields:

  • All composite numbers less than N
  • Along with their prime factorization

I'll call it "composites_with_factors()"

Assume we already have a list of primes less than N, or a primes generator that can do the same.

Note that I:

  • DO NOT need the numbers to be yielded in numerical order
  • DO NOT care if 1 is yielded at the beginning or not
  • DO NOT care if primes are yielded, too

I figure this can be done with a clever recursive generator...

So, for example, a call to composites_with_factors(16) may yield:

# yields values in form of "composite_value, (factor_tuple)"
2, (2)
4, (2, 2)
8, (2, 2, 2)
6, (2, 3)
12, (2, 2, 3)
10, (2, 5)
14, (2, 7)
3, (3)
9, (3, 3)
15, (3, 5)
5, (5)
7, (7)
11, (11)
13, (13)

As you can see from the order of my output, I conceive of this working by starting with the smallest prime on the available primes generator, and outputting all powers of that prime less than N, then try again through the powers of that prime but at each stage seeing if I can apply powers of additional primes (and still be less than N). When all combinations with THAT prime are done, drop it, and repeat with the next lowest prime number available on the primes generator.

My attempts to do this with "recursive generators" have gotten me very confused on when to pop out of the recursion with "yield ", or "raise StopIteration", or "return", or simply fall out of the recursed function.

Thanks for your wisdom!

ADDITIONAL NOTE:

I do have one way to do this now: I have written a function to factor numbers, so I can factor them down to primes, and yield the results. No problem. I keep this blazingly fast by relying on a cache of "what is the lowest prime factor of number N"... for N up to 10 million.

However, once I'm out of the cache, we'll, it devolves to "naive" factoring. (Yuck.)

The point of this post is:

  • I'm assuming that "generating large composites from their factors" will be faster than "factoring large composites"... especially since I DON'T care about order, and
  • How can you have a Python generator "recursively" call itself, and yield a single stream of generated things?
share|improve this question
1  
What efforts have you made towards this method? Show us your code, please. –  Makoto Apr 11 '12 at 15:55
1  
Have you made the primes generator, or just an odd-numbers generator to start with? Maybe it'll be easier to understand if you do one piece at a time. Please show us the code you have so far. –  gbulmer Apr 11 '12 at 15:58
    
@Makoto: My attempts have utterly failed, and will NOT illuminate if I post the wrecks. For example, my case only yielded a fraction of all integers less than N. –  Dan H Apr 11 '12 at 16:03
2  
You mention you want to do this recursively, but it's hard to beat a sieve! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sieve_of_Eratosthenes. This could be trivially modified to keep the factors. –  Hooked Apr 11 '12 at 16:05
1  
@Hooked: OK, I can look at the SoE again. Maybe I can "invert" it to yield composites rather than primes. However, I once tried to implement an SoE (for primes), and in my observation it took up a HUGE amount of memory (as each stage needs to "remember" what it is going to filter out). –  Dan H Apr 11 '12 at 16:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Assuming primesiter(n) creates an iterator over all primes up to n (1 should NOT be included in primesiter, or following code well enter inf. loop)

def composite_value(n, min_p = 0):
    for p in primesiter(n):
        # avoid double solutions such as (6, [2,3]), and (6, [3,2])
        if p < min_p: continue
        yield (p, [p])
        for t, r in composite_value(n//p, min_p = p): # uses integer division
            yield (t*p, [p] + r)

Output

>> list(composite_value(16))
[(2, [2]),
 (4, [2, 2]),
 (8, [2, 2, 2]),
 (16, [2, 2, 2, 2]),
 (12, [2, 2, 3]),
 (6, [2, 3]),
 (10, [2, 5]),
 (14, [2, 7]),
 (3, [3]),
 (9, [3, 3]),
 (15, [3, 5]),
 (5, [5]),
 (7, [7]),
 (11, [11]),
 (13, [13])]

NOTE: it includes n (= 16) as well, and I used list instead of tuples. Both can easily be resolved if needed, but I will leave that as an exercise.

share|improve this answer
1  
Bravo! That is the "recursive generator" that eluded me. What I see that was confuddling me: a) I need TWO "for loops" inside a single call to the function, b) one yield BEFORE the "inner for loop" and one IN the "inner for loop". –  Dan H Apr 11 '12 at 17:48
    
this is beautiful –  jnnnnn Dec 24 '12 at 1:18

Here is a sieve-based implementation (please excuse the un-pythonic code :) ):

def sieve(n):
    # start each number off with an empty list of factors
    #   note that nums[n] will give the factors of n
    nums = [[] for x in range(n)]
    # start the counter at the first prime
    prime = 2
    while prime < n:
        power = prime
        while power < n:
            multiple = power
            while multiple < n:
                nums[multiple].append(prime)
                multiple += power
            power *= prime
        # find the next prime
        #   the next number with no factors
        k = prime + 1
        if k >= n:    # no primes left!!!
            return nums
        # the prime will have an empty list of factors
        while len(nums[k]) > 0:
            k += 1
            if k >= n:    # no primes left!!!
                return nums
        prime = k
    return nums


def runTests():
    primes = sieve(100)
    if primes[3] == [3]:
        print "passed"
    else:
        print "failed"
    if primes[10] == [2,5]:
        print "passed"
    else:
        print "failed"
    if primes[32] == [2,2,2,2,2]:
        print "passed"
    else:
        print "failed"

Tests:

>>> runTests()
passed
passed
passed

On my machine, this took 56 seconds to run:

primes = sieve(14000000) # 14 million!

Examples:

>>> primes[:10]
[[], [], [2], [3], [2, 2], [5], [2, 3], [7], [2, 2, 2], [3, 3]]

>>> primes[10000]
[2, 2, 2, 2, 5, 5, 5, 5]

>>> primes[65536]
[2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2]

>>> primes[6561]
[3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3]

>>> primes[233223]
[3, 17, 17, 269]

Memory consumption: about 50 million integers, in 14 million lists:

>>> sum(map(len, primes))
53303934
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent work. I need to study sieves more, and I will use this as an example. (I'm still wary of the memory requirements... but that is likely due to my long time ago [and probably bad] implementation of sieve stages as independent objects, each with their own memory requirements.) –  Dan H Apr 11 '12 at 17:52

Recursively (pseudo-code):

def get_factorizations_of_all_numbers( start = starting_point
                                     , end = end_point
                                     , minp = mimimum_prime
                                     ):
    if start > end:
        return Empty_List
    if minp ^ 2 > end:
        return list_of_all_primes( start, end )
    else
        a = minp * get_factorizations_of_all_numbers( rounddown(start/minp)
                                                    , roundup(end/minp)
                                                    )
        b = get_factorizations_of_all_numbers( start
                                             , end
                                             , next_prime( minp )
                                             )
        return append( a , b )

get_factorizations_of_all_numbers( 1, n, 2 )
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. To my eyes, this pseudo-code is basically the same as @catchmeifyoutry's implementation. (As for the test with minp ^ 2 > end: I have the hunch that is only the tiniest of optimization, as the next recursion "in" to itself via end=end/minp will effectively catch the same condition.) –  Dan H Apr 11 '12 at 18:01

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