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I write a function to copy files from directory A to directory B recursive. The code is like this:

import os
import shutil
import sys
from os.path import join, exists

def copy_file(src, dest):
    for path, dirs, files in os.walk(src, topdown=True):
        if len(dirs) > 0:
            for di in dirs:
                copy_file(join(path, di), join(dest,  di))

        if not exists(dest):
            os.makedirs(dest)
        for fi in files:
            shutil.copy(join(path, fi), dest)

In my test, the input args are like this:

src = d:/dev

and it have one sub directory named py. Also, py has a sub directory named test

dest = d:/dev_bak

So, when i test my code, something strange happened. In my dest directory which is d:/dev_bak, three sub directories are created. That is: d:/dev_bak/py; d:/dev_bak/py/test; d:/dev_bak/test.

In my design, the structure of dev_bak will be same as dev. So, why this happened!

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can easily diagnose this by putting

    print path, dirs, files

right below

for path, dirs, files in os.walk(src, topdown=True):

Essentially, you're recursing twice.

By itself, os.walk descends into subdirectories. You're double-descending by recursively calling your own function. Here is some example output from that print statement:

>>> copy_file("c:\Intel", "c:\Intel-Bak")
c:\Intel ['ExtremeGraphics', 'Logs'] []
c:\Intel\ExtremeGraphics ['CUI'] []
c:\Intel\ExtremeGraphics\CUI ['Resource'] []
c:\Intel\ExtremeGraphics\CUI\Resource [] ['Intel\xae Graphics and Media Control Panel.lnk', 'Intel\xae HD Graphics.lnk']
c:\Intel\ExtremeGraphics\CUI\Resource [] ['Intel\xae Graphics and Media Control Panel.lnk', 'Intel\xae HD Graphics.lnk']
c:\Intel\ExtremeGraphics\CUI ['Resource'] []
c:\Intel\ExtremeGraphics\CUI\Resource [] ['Intel\xae Graphics and Media Control Panel.lnk', 'Intel\xae HD Graphics.lnk']
c:\Intel\ExtremeGraphics\CUI\Resource [] ['Intel\xae Graphics and Media Control Panel.lnk', 'Intel\xae HD Graphics.lnk']
c:\Intel\Logs [] ['IntelChipset.log', 'IntelControlCenter.log', 'IntelGFX.log', 'IntelGFXCoin.log']
c:\Intel\ExtremeGraphics ['CUI'] []
c:\Intel\ExtremeGraphics\CUI ['Resource'] []
c:\Intel\ExtremeGraphics\CUI\Resource [] ['Intel\xae Graphics and Media Control Panel.lnk', 'Intel\xae HD Graphics.lnk']
c:\Intel\ExtremeGraphics\CUI\Resource [] ['Intel\xae Graphics and Media Control Panel.lnk', 'Intel\xae HD Graphics.lnk']
c:\Intel\ExtremeGraphics\CUI ['Resource'] []
c:\Intel\ExtremeGraphics\CUI\Resource [] ['Intel\xae Graphics and Media Control Panel.lnk', 'Intel\xae HD Graphics.lnk']
c:\Intel\ExtremeGraphics\CUI\Resource [] ['Intel\xae Graphics and Media Control Panel.lnk', 'Intel\xae HD Graphics.lnk']
c:\Intel\Logs [] ['IntelChipset.log', 'IntelControlCenter.log', 'IntelGFX.log', 'IntelGFXCoin.log']

As you can see, the directories get visited twice.

You should fix the logic of your program so it visits each directory only once, but theoretically you could just ignore any directory you've already been to:

visited = []
def copy_file(src, dest):
    for path, dirs, files in os.walk(src, topdown=True):
        if path not in visited:
            for di in dirs:
                print dest, di
                copy_file(join(path, di), join(dest,  di))
            if not exists(dest):
                os.makedirs(dest)
            for fi in files:
                shutil.copy(join(path, fi), dest)
            visited.append(path)
share|improve this answer
    
thanks. But i got another question. When I read the doc of os.walk(), they say "When topdown is True, the caller can modify the dirnames list in-place (perhaps using del or slice assignment), and walk() will only recurse into the subdirectories whose names remain in dirnames;" –  linuxlsx Apr 12 '12 at 2:06
    
@linuxlsx Right. By iterating over dirs and removing every directory in it, you leave it empty. So os.walk doesn't descend at all -- the only visits to the subdirs are done by your recursive call. You've turned os.walk into a fancy os.listdir. I'm not sure what you mean by "why does it work". –  agf Apr 12 '12 at 2:37
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The shutil module already has a copytree function which will copy directories recursively. You might want to use it instead of providing your own implementation.

share|improve this answer
    
This is most likely for a class or self-education. –  agf Apr 11 '12 at 16:55
    
Exactly, the copytree() do a great job, but there are something different with my issue. copytree request the destination directory must not exist, in my design, the destination directory maybe have existed. –  linuxlsx Apr 12 '12 at 1:52
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