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Is there a programmatic benefit to using a using statement?

Notice the difference between this sample:

using Application.Data;
namespace Application.Web
{
    public class SampleClass
    {
        public void SampleMethod()
        {            
            List<Category> categories = CreateCategoriesData();
            Category expected = categories[0];
            ...
        ...
        }
    }
}

And this one:

namespace Application.Web
{
    public class SampleClass
    {
        public void SampleMethod()
        {            
            List<Data.Category> categories = CreateCategoriesData();
            Data.Category expected = categories[0];
            ...
        ...
        }
    }
}
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What do you think? –  Kirk Woll Apr 11 '12 at 17:22
4  
Define "programmatic benefit". –  BoltClock Apr 11 '12 at 17:22
    
@Adam Drummond Yes. –  mydogisbox Apr 11 '12 at 17:22
2  
There is actually no difference in terms of compiled code. There is no real answer - it depends on personal likes. This isn't a question for stackoverflow - IMHO. –  Sascha Apr 11 '12 at 17:22
2  
No, of course not. The code would compile to exactly the same thing. You can check these things for yourself using ildasm. The only benefit of fully qualifying each time is to avoid ambiguities. That's what it's going to get compiled to anyway, so the only cost is wear and tear on the programmer (eyes, fingers, etc.). –  Cody Gray Apr 11 '12 at 17:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There is no "programmatic" benefit: once the code is compiled, there is no difference in the generated libraries or executables. It is a matter of preference and sometimes coding standards of your organization. Our company prefers using the using except for rare cases where it is not possible.

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This is what I wanted to know. I was unsure if it was a case of preference or if there would be an actual benefit to picking a route. Thanks. –  Adam Apr 11 '12 at 17:28

Makes your code shorter and more readable. I don't know what other people think but personally I find it absolutely horrible to fully qualify type names in code.

Also instead of:

List<Data.Category> categories = CreateCategoriesData();

you could write

var categories = CreateCategoriesData();

and thus get rid of the using and make your code even shorter. Then when tomorrow you decide to rename a class or a namespace you will have less things to worry about.

In terms of emitted IL the two are perfectly equivalent so you should really use what is more readable to you and of course respect the established coding standards if you are working in a team of developers. I have seen both used actually and already threw my 2 cents about the second version.

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