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I have a non-Activity class (let's call it "NonActivity") that needs to post a message and get user feedback. I have a message activity (MsgActivity) class to do this. But only Activity classes can call startActivityForResult() so I made an inner helper class in NoActivity:

  // just to provide an Activity to launch MsgActivity
  class ActivityMsgClass extends Activity  {

        public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
            super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);

            Intent iMA = new Intent(this, MsgActivity.class);
            iMA.putExtra("MsgText", mParams[0]);
       ...blah blah ...
            iMA.putExtra("ButtonCode", iBtns);
            startActivityForResult(iMA,3);          
        }     
  }

My Activity class is declared in the Manifest thusly:

<activity android:name="ActivityMsgClass"
          android:configChanges="orientation"
          android:screenOrientation="portrait"
          android:launchMode="singleInstance"></activity>

But when I try to invoke it . . .

                Intent i = new Intent(ctx, ActivityMsgClass.class);
                i.setFlags(Intent.FLAG_ACTIVITY_NEW_TASK);
                ctx.startActivity(i);

... I get an ActivityNotFound exception. I've also tried it without the FLAG_ACTIVITY_NEW_TASK, and I've also tried qualifying the name in the manifest, e.g.,

<activity android:name=".NoActivity.ActivityMsgClass"

. . . to no avail. What am I doing wrong?

Thanks in advance.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The technical solution is to specify the fully qualified activity path in the manifest.

The actual solution is to avoid doing this. Let activity be a public class, and not an inner class, this is just not good practice.

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If I do that what's the best way to pass the parameters back and forth between the NonActivity and Activity classes? One reason I wanted to use an inner class is so it had local access to NonActivity's variables. –  user316117 Apr 11 '12 at 17:59
    
It depends on the case, but usually, inner class is not the solution when working with activities. –  MByD Apr 11 '12 at 18:01
    
I agree - it made me queasy to use an inner class, as well, but I was stymied by how to get the data back and forth. Static "globals"? What do you suggest? –  user316117 Apr 11 '12 at 18:26
    
Again, depends on your needs. If you want to use globals, do it by extending Application. –  MByD Apr 11 '12 at 19:07
    
I bit the bullet and made a separate Activity and used globals for parameter passing (yuck). –  user316117 Apr 12 '12 at 15:55

In your manifeast file change like below and try...

<activity android:name=".ActivityMsgClass"
          android:configChanges="orientation"
          android:screenOrientation="portrait"
          android:launchMode="singleInstance"></activity>
<activity android:name=".MsgActivity"
              android:configChanges="orientation"
              android:screenOrientation="portrait"
              android:launchMode="singleInstance"></activity>
share|improve this answer

your activity name declaration should start with a period. declare it this way.

<activity android:name=".ActivityMsgClass"
      android:configChanges="orientation"
      android:screenOrientation="portrait"
      android:launchMode="singleInstance"></activity>

also make sure that the activity MsgActivity is also declared in the manifest.

share|improve this answer
    
No amount of qualifying it makes any difference. I've tried .ActivityMsgClass, NoActivity.ActivityMsgClass, .NoActivity.ActivityMsgClass, and com.demo.test.NoActivity.ActivityMsgClass . I'm guessing this either has something to do with it being an inner class, or trying to launch it from a non-Activity class. –  user316117 Apr 11 '12 at 18:20
    
have you also tried using the $ notation for the activity name oin the manifest? but i dont get why you need this approach? Inner activities should be avoided as much as possible. if you just want to access variables then protected static variables would be a better approach! –  Anurag Ramdasan Apr 11 '12 at 18:56

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