Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a method in a class as follows...

class foo{
   int bar::randomNum10to50(){
      srand (time(NULL));
      int random10to50 = rand()%50+10; 
      return random10to50;
   }
}

However when I call it from main (just to check the output, because i wasn't getting the behaviour from the program I expected) like so....

foo create;
for (int i=0; i<20;i++){
    cout<<create.randomNum10to50()<<endl;
}

it's exactly the same number every time it's run (ie, 9,9,9,9,9,....; next run: 43,43,43,43,.....) I don't know what is going wrong. The code runs very quickly so I was thinking that MIGHT be the issue but I don't see why there wouldn't be a difference even slightly between the 20 iterations of it. Any thoughts are appreciated! Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
"9,9,9,9,9" was a 'typo', right? I'm just wondering because you should only get results in the range of 10 to 50.. –  jorey Apr 12 '12 at 1:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 20 down vote accepted

You need to call srand() once, outside of the randomizer function. Otherwise, you re-seed the random number generator each time with the exact same time value, producing the same initial "random" value.

share|improve this answer
    
gotch...thanks! I feel dumb now. –  crazy_pants Apr 11 '12 at 17:38

You are calling srand() with the same seed every loop iteration, since the time doesn't actually have, um, time to change. Make sure to call it only once and everything should work.

share|improve this answer

Cody Gray already says what you're doing wrong here, but here's an example of doing this with the <random> library:

#include <random>

class foo{
   std::mt19937 engine;
public:
   foo() : engine(std::random_device()()) {}

   int randomNum10to50(){
      return std::uniform_int_distribution<>(10,50)(engine); 
   }
};

foo create;
for (int i=0; i<20;i++){
    cout<<create.randomNum10to50()<<endl;
}

Note that rand()%50 + 10 doesn't ever produce the value 50, only 10 to 49. uniform_int_distribution is better because the range you give it is inclusive and so in the common use case you're less likely to mess it up. Also using uniform_int_distribution gives you unbiased results whereas rand()%50+10 probably has some slight bias.


If you have a compiler with a bit more C++11 support you can do:

class foo{
   std::mt19937 engine{std::random_device{}()};
public:
   int randomNum10to50(){
      return std::uniform_int_distribution<>(10,50)(engine); 
   }
};
share|improve this answer
    
nice! Thanks! I may end up using that. Good info! –  crazy_pants Apr 11 '12 at 17:55
    
Note your compiler will need to support C++11 to do this otherwise you can use boost which is where <random> came from I believe. –  AJG85 Apr 11 '12 at 18:28
    
@AJG85 Yeah, it uses some C++11, but I was careful to limit it to what's widely supported. VS11 and gcc as far back as 4.5 can run this. But I think I'll add a version that uses more C++11 to clean it up a little... –  bames53 Apr 11 '12 at 18:44
    
Since VC10 actually but it's still worth noting as I know people using VC6 still. –  AJG85 Apr 11 '12 at 18:47
    
@AJG85 ah, neat. I had thought random_device wasn't in until 11. Anyway VC6 hardly even counts as a C++ compiler. I hear it's fast at compiling whatever language that is though ; ) –  bames53 Apr 11 '12 at 18:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.