Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way to find out what version of R certain functions were introduced in? For example regmatches is a useful function but it is fairly new and I believe it was introduced with 2.14. How could I easily figure out something like regmatches was introduced in R 2.14?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Even easier than Dirk's solution is to use R's news function:

> newsDB <- news()
> news(grepl("regmatches",Text), db=newsDB)
Changes in version 2.14.0:

NEW FEATURES

    o   New function regmatches() for extracting or replacing matched or
         non-matched substrings from match data obtained by regexpr(),
         gregexpr() and regexec().
share|improve this answer

You can use the SVN repository:

edd@max:~/svn/r-devel/src/library/base/man$ svn log regmatches.Rd 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r57006 | hornik | 2011-09-14 14:04:21 -0500 (Wed, 14 Sep 2011) | 1 line

Improve example.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r56997 | hornik | 2011-09-12 15:16:03 -0500 (Mon, 12 Sep 2011) | 1 line

Document regmatches replacement function.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r56893 | hornik | 2011-09-02 05:31:01 -0500 (Fri, 02 Sep 2011) | 1 line

Add first version of regmatches replacement function.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r56818 | hornik | 2011-08-29 02:49:17 -0500 (Mon, 29 Aug 2011) | 1 line

Spelling.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
r56752 | hornik | 2011-08-18 01:40:07 -0500 (Thu, 18 Aug 2011) | 1 line

Add regmatches().
------------------------------------------------------------------------
edd@max:~/svn/r-devel/src/library/base/man$ 

I applied svn log to the manual page as I didn't immediately see the R file the function is defined in; the command would work the same way there...

share|improve this answer
9  
-1 for not using Rcpp. :P –  Joshua Ulrich Apr 11 '12 at 18:09
3  
Yes, it clearly is a suboptimal solution that way. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Apr 11 '12 at 18:10
4  
A better method would have been to use Julia, not Rcpp. Yeesh. –  geoffjentry Apr 11 '12 at 19:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.