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I have the following jquery script to open a link to a new page and have a scrolling effect. However, I can't get it to work in Firefox 11.0.

var jump = function (e) {
    if (e) {
        e.preventDefault();
        var target = $(this).attr("href");
    } else {
        var target = location.hash;
    }

    $('html,body').animate(
{
   scrollTop: $(target).offset().top
}, 2000, function () {
   location.hash = target;
});

}

$('html, body').hide();

$(document).ready(function () {
    $('a[href^=#]').bind("click", jump);

    if (location.hash) {
        setTimeout(function () {
            $('html, body').scrollTop(0).show();
            jump();
        }, 1000);
    } else {
        $('html, body').show();
    }
});

It just keeps looping past this part of setTimeout and then keeps starting back at the beginning.

$('html, body').scrollTop(0).show();
jump();

And this only happens in Firefox 11.0 Does anyone know how to fix this or a work around?

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setTimeout()s a native Javascript function, not jquery specific. –  Spudley Apr 11 '12 at 18:48
    
I'm a little confused about what exactly is happening that shouldn't be. Can you create a jsfiddle to reproduce this? –  idrumgood Apr 11 '12 at 19:00
    
I'm using asp.net mvc, so not sure if it will work with jsfiddle. But I do have it live on one of my links on our website if that helps. www.hovdenoil.com hover over lubricants and click lubriplate –  Lars Hovden Apr 11 '12 at 19:23
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3 Answers

try using window.setTimeout as I think that's how it should be called. Also, you're using a timeout of 0, so, why?

share|improve this answer
    
I used 0 just because I wanted it to load right away, but maybe that isn't the right logic –  Lars Hovden Apr 11 '12 at 18:49
    
I tried 1000, 2000, etc. Doesn't matter what number I put in it still does it –  Lars Hovden Apr 11 '12 at 18:54
    
I'm using asp.net mvc, so not sure if it will work with jsfiddle. But I do have it live on one of my links on our website if that helps. www.hovdenoil.com hover over lubricants and click lubriplate –  Lars Hovden Apr 11 '12 at 19:18
    
Um... not sure if I want to click 'lubriplate' I've been fooled too many times before ;) –  idrumgood Apr 11 '12 at 19:21
    
What can I say. We're a Petroleum and Lubricants business. That's one of our suppliers –  Lars Hovden Apr 11 '12 at 19:24
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Using setTimeout with a timeout of 0 is basically as if you didn't use setTimeout at all, and I guess Firefox doesn't like it.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried 1000, 2000, etc. Doesn't matter what number I put in it still does it –  Lars Hovden Apr 11 '12 at 18:56
    
I mean, try not using setTimeout at all. –  Little Big Bot Apr 11 '12 at 18:57
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

The error was in the MVC framework. Petr Vostrel was the one who discovered it, so I give the credit to him. Here is what he found.

The MicrosoftAjax component, attempts some browser's history management and it uses the hash portion of URL for that matter, which is a valid standard procedure, up until this point. At initialization time, the Sys$_Application$initialize() through _navigate() engages the _raiseNavigate() application method. And this one does some dances specifically for Firefox:

// Name:        MicrosoftAjax.debug.js
// Assembly:    System.Web.Extensions
// Version:     4.0.0.0
// FileVersion: 4.0.20526.0

if ((Sys.Browser.agent === Sys.Browser.Firefox) && window.location.hash &&
(!window.frameElement || window.top.location.hash)) {
window.history.go(0);
}

Three conditions:

browser is Firefox
address carries a hash portion after the URL
it is not inside a frame

All of them pass in your case and the beast is unleashed:

window.history.go(0);

That instructs browser's history manager to go back or forward by the distance given as argument. -2 goes one step back, 1 goes one step forward. Thus 0 effectively reloads the page. And does it on every page load for any hash given to the page. Can't think of any valid purpose of this line there anyway...

Sure enough if I comment out those rather hairy and pointless lines, it works! It seems to be a backward compatibility attempt for Firefox 3.5 or lower, so I would say remove it or better update your MVC.

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