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Consider this piece of code:

int *a, *b;
a = foo();
if (a)
   b = a;
a = bar();

The problem is, when a updates by calling bar(), b also updates. However I want to make a backup by using b = a. What is the problem then?

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I can't understand the question. Could be be more clear about what you mean when you say "when a updates" and "b also updates". – David Heffernan Apr 11 '12 at 18:41
    
@David Heffernan: I mean when a = bar() executes, b is also changed to the new value of a – mahmood Apr 11 '12 at 18:42
2  
No, that is simply not possible. – David Heffernan Apr 11 '12 at 18:43
2  
You appear to be asserting that assigning to a results in b changing. That's not possible. – David Heffernan Apr 11 '12 at 18:44
1  
The code snippet you provide doesn't behave the way you claim. Can you provide instead a complete program (keep it as short as possible. 10 lines is fine) that demonstrates the problem you are having? See sscce.org. – Robᵩ Apr 11 '12 at 18:53
up vote 0 down vote accepted
int *a, *b;
b = new int;

a = foo();
if (a)
   *b = *a;
a = bar();
...
delete(b);

(The value at address a is assigned to the value at address b.)

What you are doing right now is making a and b point to the same place in memory. Then, if the value in a or b is updated, they pointers both point to the new value.

By the way, unless bar() returns a pointer, you probably want *a = foo() and *a = bar().

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b is uninitialized (i.e. contains undefined memory address), so this would a an access violation. – Branko Dimitrijevic Apr 11 '12 at 18:49
    
Well, I wasn't providing full code here, but I suppose you are right. Fixed. – Zéychin Apr 11 '12 at 18:50
    
Now you have a memory leak. And are frowned upon by C++ gods for using malloc instead of new ;) – Branko Dimitrijevic Apr 11 '12 at 18:55
    
I didn't even realize that this is C++. xD... I don't believe that I've introduced any memory leaks into the code, but if you could enlighten me, I would appreciate it. – Zéychin Apr 11 '12 at 18:58
3  
Sorry for nit-picking @Zéychin, I'm sure you know about all that, but I don't think the OP does, so it's probably better not so suggest to him that allocating memory without eventually freeing it would be OK. – Branko Dimitrijevic Apr 11 '12 at 19:06

You could just back up the value of a:

int *a, b;
a = foo();
if (a)
   b = *a;
a = bar();

or if you want to keep b as a pointer:

...
   *b = *a;
...
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if a == b, then bar() is changing the value at a, not assigning a new a. This makes the most sense memory wise. If what you care about is the actual integer, not the address, instead of assigning b = a assign *b = *a.

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The...

int *a;
// ...
a = foo();

...would not even compile if the function was declared as int foo();, so I'll assume it's declared as int* foo();. Ditto for int* bar();.

Don't return a raw pointer like this. It might not be clear whether caller should delete it or not. The good documentation can only partially resolve this problem (human beings have a tendency of ignoring the documentation from time to time). Why not just copy the integer value, or at least return a reference to integer in case it really needs to be shared?

That being said, in your particular case, foo() and bar() apparently use the same int "object" internally, so a continues to point to the same object as b even after bar() has modified it.

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