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I have the following function to count the number of commas (or any other character) in a String without counting those inside double quotes. I want to know if there's a better way to achieve this or even if you can find some case where this function can crash.

public int countCharOfString(char c, String s) {
    int numberOfC = 0;
    boolean doubleQuotesFound = false;
    for(int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++){
        if(s.charAt(i) == c && !doubleQuotesFound){
            numberOfC++;
        }else if(s.charAt(i) == c && doubleQuotesFound){
            continue;
        }else if(s.charAt(i) == '\"'){
            doubleQuotesFound = !doubleQuotesFound;
        }
    }
    return numberOfC;
}

Thanks for any advise

share|improve this question
1  
Replace your if / else stuff with a switch statement. – Aidanc Apr 11 '12 at 19:37
up vote 3 down vote accepted

This implementation has two differences:

  • Use CharSequence instead of String
  • No need of a boolean value to track if we are inside a quoted subsequence.

The function:

public static int countCharOfString(char quote, CharSequence sequence) {

    int total = 0, length = sequence.length();

    for(int i = 0; i < length; i++){
        char c = sequence.charAt(i);
        if (c == '"') {
            // Skip quoted sequence
            for (i++; i < length && sequence.charAt(i)!='"'; i++) {}
        } else if (c == quote) {
            total++;
        }
    }

    return total;
 }
share|improve this answer
public static int countCharOfString(char c, String s)
{
    int numberOfC = 0;
    int innerC = 0;
    boolean holdDoubleQuotes = false;
    for(int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++)
    {
        char r = s.charAt(i);
        if(i == s.length() - 1 && r != '\"')
        {
            numberOfC += innerC;
            if(r == c) numberOfC++;
        }
        else if(r == c && !holdDoubleQuotes) numberOfC++;
        else if(r == c && holdDoubleQuotes) innerC++;
        else if(r == '\"' && holdDoubleQuotes)
        {
            holdDoubleQuotes = false;
            innerC = 0;
        }
        else if(r == '\"' && !holdDoubleQuotes) holdDoubleQuotes = true;
    }
    return numberOfC;
}

System.out.println(countCharOfString(',', "Hello, BRabbit27, how\",,,\" are, you?"));

OUTPUT:

3

An alternative would be using regex:

public static int countCharOfString(char c, String s)
{
   s = " " + s + " "; // To make the first and last commas to be counted
   return s.split("[^\"" + c + "*\"][" + c + "]").length - 1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't have a Java compiler handler handy, but this looks like it will fail if there is more than one comma in quotes. Would it be better to have if(r == c && !holdDoubleQuotes) numberOfC++; and remove the numberOfC-- later on? – btlog Apr 11 '12 at 19:46
    
@btlog You are right! I updated the answer. – Eng.Fouad Apr 11 '12 at 20:01
  • you should not call charAt() several times inside the loop. Use a char variable.
  • you should not call length() for each iteration. use an int before the loop.
  • you should avoid duplicate comparison with c - use nested if/else.
share|improve this answer

Maybe not the fastest...

public int countCharOfString(char c, String s) {
    final String removedQuoted = s.replaceAll("\".*?\"", "");
    int total = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i < removedQuoted.length(); ++i)
        if(removedQuoted.charAt(i) == c)
            ++total;
    return total;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Actually I profiled it and it was more time consuming. I appreciate your help ! – BRabbit27 Apr 11 '12 at 20:27
1  
@BRabbit27: well, since it involves regular expression it will probably be the slowest solution here - but also one of the shortest :-) – Tomasz Nurkiewicz Apr 11 '12 at 20:28

Simpler, less bug-prone (and yes, less performant than walking the string char by char and keeping track of everything by hand):

public static int countCharOfString(char c, String s) {
  s = s.replaceAll("\".*?\"", "");
  int cnt = 0;
  for (int foundAt = s.indexOf(c); foundAt > -1; foundAt = s.indexOf(c, foundAt+1)) 
    cnt++;
  return cnt;
}
share|improve this answer

It takes a large string to make a big difference.

The reason this code is faster is it contains on average 1.5 checks per loop instead of 3 checks per loop. It does this by using two loops, one for quoted and one for unquoted state.

public static void main(String... args) {
    String s = generateString(20 * 1024 * 1024);
    for (int i = 0; i < 15; i++) {
        long start = System.nanoTime();
        countCharOfString(',', s);
        long mid = System.nanoTime();
        countCharOfString2(',', s);
        long end = System.nanoTime();
        System.out.printf("countCharOfString() took %.3f ms, countCharOfString2() took %.3f ms%n",
                (mid - start) / 1e6, (end - mid) / 1e6);
    }
}

private static String generateString(int length) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(length);
    Random rand = new Random(1);
    while (sb.length() < length)
        sb.append((char) (rand.nextInt(96) + 32)); // includes , and "
    return sb.toString();
}

public static int countCharOfString2(char c, String s) {
    int numberOfC = 0, i = 0;
    while (i < s.length()) {
        // not quoted
        while (i < s.length()) {
            char ch = s.charAt(i++);
            if (ch == c)
                numberOfC++;
            else if (ch == '"')
                break;
        }
        // quoted
        while (i < s.length()) {
            char ch = s.charAt(i++);
            if (ch == '"')
                break;
        }
    }
    return numberOfC;
}


public static int countCharOfString(char c, String s) {
    int numberOfC = 0;
    boolean doubleQuotesFound = false;
    for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++) {
        if (s.charAt(i) == c && !doubleQuotesFound) {
            numberOfC++;
        } else if (s.charAt(i) == c && doubleQuotesFound) {
            continue;
        } else if (s.charAt(i) == '\"') {
            doubleQuotesFound = !doubleQuotesFound;
        }
    }
    return numberOfC;
}

prints

countCharOfString() took 33.348 ms, countCharOfString2() took 31.381 ms
countCharOfString() took 28.265 ms, countCharOfString2() took 25.801 ms
countCharOfString() took 28.142 ms, countCharOfString2() took 14.576 ms
countCharOfString() took 28.372 ms, countCharOfString2() took 14.540 ms
countCharOfString() took 28.191 ms, countCharOfString2() took 14.616 ms
share|improve this answer
1  
Your answer deserves a +1. – Eng.Fouad Apr 11 '12 at 21:35

You could also use a regex and String.split()

It might look something like this:

public int countNonQuotedOccurrences(String inputstring, char searchChar)
{
  String regexPattern = "[^\"]" + searchChar + "[^\"]";
  return inputString.split(regexPattern).length - 1;
}

Disclaimer:

This just shows the basic approach.

The above code will not check for searchChar at the beginning or end of the string.

You could either check for this manually or add to regexPattern.

share|improve this answer
    
What I don't like of split is that if the string ends with char c they don't get counted. For example Hi,How,Are,You,,, will return 3 instead of 6. – BRabbit27 Apr 11 '12 at 19:52
    
Thanks for your time and help ! – BRabbit27 Apr 11 '12 at 19:54
    
Was just about to add that... The above code won't work when the char is at the beginning or end of the String. You could either test for that separately or add some "or"ed regexes. – jahroy Apr 11 '12 at 19:55
2  
String.split uses regular expression. And regular expressions are - for such simple string manipulatios - extremely expensive. – A.H. Apr 11 '12 at 20:00

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