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I've been told that getting elements by getElementbyid or jQuery("#tagname") is considered a "hack".

The argument is that is not compiled, and therefore could take a long time to track down a silly typo.

Or a better argument: it would take a long time to refactor everything when a certain element id changes.

What are some arguments against this "hack" argument? And is there a nice solution around it?

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closed as not constructive by Patricia, Vega, Rory McCrossan, David Thomas, the Tin Man Apr 12 '12 at 0:02

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This is not a q/a but rather a discussion question. I'm sure one of the Mods will be along shortly. That being said, I don't feel its a hack, and document.getElementById is the only way to interact with the DOM(that I know of) by ids. Yes, typos are prone, but that's why you create variables in your script to hold these constants in one place. –  Thomas Jones Apr 11 '12 at 19:48
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"The argument is that is not compiled" What is this fabrication? –  BoltClock Apr 11 '12 at 19:50
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A -1 to whoever told you this nonsense. Hint: no JavaScript is compiled. It's a dynamic language! –  josh3736 Apr 11 '12 at 19:53
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@Kirean: I actually don't think it's a bad question. (People have become way too trigger-happy with close votes...) The question could use some minor polishing to make it more focused, but it's not close-worthy -- it has already received some good answers. –  josh3736 Apr 11 '12 at 20:00
1  
I can highly recommend Selectors selectoring by @fat where you can read up on exactly this kind of thing and more! –  Matijs Apr 11 '12 at 20:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

ummm. first and foremost I would say getElementById is a standard DOM function. Also, I think that getElementById is much faster than getElementsByClassName and then looping to find the one you want. Maybe they're referring to hardcoding the id, like if your script has lots of places that say $("#element-id"), then you could replace "element-id" with a variable called eid, and set it dynamically.

Of course I must say it's not a hack and I'm not sure who thought it was. Consider a simple example:

<form id='my-form-name'>
  <input id='input-text' ... />
  ...
</form>

I would say document.forms[0] is WAY worse than saying $('#my-form-name'). And being able to say $('#my-form-name #input-text') is waaaay better than document.forms[0].children[0] or whatever it would be.

Lastly, you can always do:

var $someElement = $('#el-id'); 

That way you only have the id hardcoded in one place, and "refactoring" your code involves changing one string...

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@josh3736 Thanks for the edits! –  Kasapo Apr 12 '12 at 16:44

Unless you, personally have had problems with it, I wouldn't worry about it.

Everybody uses IDs to identify elements. It's fast both in writing the code and in the execution when looking for an ID. If you're worried about typos / refactoring, you could always store your element in an object and use that throughout your script:

var tagname = $("#tagname");

But really, I wouldn't worry about it. You could always use automatic search and replace for it if you came to rename them.

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I've been told that getting elements by getElementbyid [sic] or jQuery("#tagname") is considered a "hack".

Whoever told you that is wrong. getElementById is not a "hack", it's a built in JavaScript function. It's how you get elements by IDs. Internally, jQuery will use it when doing jQuery("#tagname"). Native DOM functions are much faster than jQuery's built-in CSS engine (sizzle), and getting elements by their ID is the fastest way to get an element.

The argument is that is not compiled, and therefore could take a long time to track down a silly typo.

I don't understand this argument at all. Compiled or not, if you change something in one spot, you're gonna have to change it in other places. Consider this PHP code:

<?php
$name = "Joe";

echo $name;

What if I decide to change $name to $customerName? Now, I'm gonna have to track down a "silly typo" in my code.

Or a better argument: it would take a long time to refactor everything when a certain element id changes.

This is, in fact, a better argument. You can do the DOM lookup once, and then use that variable elsewhere. For example:

var $content = $('#content');

$content.attr('rel', 'test'); // Use $content to edit the element

So, if the ID changes, you can just change $('#content') to something else, and it'll work.

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the "not compiled" argument is that developers will not know of an error they introduce (typos) until the run it, since scripts are not compiled. But i was wondering if there are advanced tools/editors these days that perhaps parses scripts and identify potential issues. –  AlvinfromDiaspar Apr 11 '12 at 20:23
    
@AlvinfromDiaspar: I don't know any IDEs that parse JavaScript, sorry. Also, typos may not be syntax errors. Let's say you do $('#content2') instead of $('#content'). This may be a "typo" but it's not an error, it's perfectly valid code. No IDE is going to know this is wrong. –  Rocket Hazmat Apr 11 '12 at 20:27
    
@AlvinfromDiaspar JSLint will perform some extra checks -- it's a code-quality tool for JS that might be what you're looking for: jslint.com –  Kasapo Apr 11 '12 at 21:09

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