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Trying to format a mutliline string in Ruby

heredoc and %q{ } have the issue that they include whitespace used for formatting the code.

s = %q{Foo
         Bar
         Baz}
puts s

Incorrectly outputs the following:

Foo
          Bar
          Baz   

The following works, but is a bit ugly with the \ characters.

s = "Foo\n" \
    "  Bar\n" \
    "  Baz"
puts s

The following works in python:

s = ("Foo\n"
     "  Bar\n"
     "  Baz")
print s

Is there an equivalent in Ruby?

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You should use textwrap.dedent as the equivalent Python example, because the Ruby snippet is hardly more complicated than your Python snippet. You should also make it clear that your not interested in non-builtin methods. –  Niklas B. Apr 11 '12 at 20:21
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A trick I stole from The Ruby Way:

class String
  def heredoc(prefix='|')
    gsub /^\s*#{Regexp.quote(prefix)}/m, ''
  end
end

s = <<-END.heredoc
    |Foo
    |  Bar
    |  Baz
    END
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build in allright but more by hazard than intended i suppose

s = %w{ Foo
        Bar
        Baz}

puts s

=> 
Foo
Bar
Baz

And if you want to keep the indentation of the first line, this one is surely build in by design

s   = <<-END
        Foo
          Bar
          Baz
      END
puts s

=>
        Foo
          Bar
          Baz
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It's probably better to call join("\n") on that first one, lest it only work as expected when called with puts. –  Andrew Marshall Apr 11 '12 at 21:29
    
yeah, i considered doing so but the beauty of this solution is the simplicity and if you use other print methods you can always add it like eg print s.join("\n") You can also use p s to have the array look and if course it IS an array what in some cases suites fine. Moreover, the more you add the less build it is isn't it ? Thans for the suggestion Andrew –  peter Apr 11 '12 at 22:05
    
Except the OP is asking for a string, not an array. –  Andrew Marshall Apr 11 '12 at 22:16
    
Andrew, its starts as a string, gets arrayed and is presented like a string, if not good enough look at my second solution which best answers the OP's question –  peter Apr 11 '12 at 23:43
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You can always do something like this:

s = ["Foo",
     "  Bar",
     "  Baz"].join("\n")
puts s
=>
Foo
  Bar
  Baz

That way, you have quotation marks to explicitly demarcate the beginning and end of the strings, and the indentation whitespace is not mixed up with the strings.

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