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I'm having so much trouble with this and any help would be great.

I have a simple table in Oracle 10 that looks like this

Name | EmployeeID |  ManagerID | Title

I need a query to return all reports for a given employee ID

So if I pass it employee ID of 1000 it will loop through the direct reports and then indirect reports etc.

I've messed with the recursion samples, but none seem to work for me. I know I'm just not setting it up right. Thanks for any help.

FYI. I'm looking for a SQL query on this.

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Are you trying to write a SQL query that returns the data? Or are you trying to write a PL/SQL procedure that, for example, prints the data using recursion? –  Justin Cave Apr 11 '12 at 20:10
    
Just a plain SQL query –  jdross Apr 11 '12 at 20:11
    
And where/what are "reports"? Are they rows in the table above, or there is another table you haven't shown us yet? Also, what is "direct" - direct parent or direct child? –  Branko Dimitrijevic Apr 11 '12 at 20:50
    
Sorry, when I was saying direct reports I was referring to each employee has their manager in their the manager ID field –  jdross Apr 11 '12 at 20:53
    
So "report" is "subordinate"? –  Branko Dimitrijevic Apr 11 '12 at 20:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First, let's setup the test data...

CREATE TABLE EMPLOYEE (
    EMPLOYEE_ID INT PRIMARY KEY,
    MANAGER_ID INT,
    NAME VARCHAR2(20),
    TITLE VARCHAR2(20),
    FOREIGN KEY (MANAGER_ID) REFERENCES EMPLOYEE (EMPLOYEE_ID)
);

INSERT INTO EMPLOYEE(EMPLOYEE_ID, NAME, TITLE) VALUES (1, 'Rob', 'CEO');
    INSERT INTO EMPLOYEE VALUES (2, 1, 'Bob', 'Manager');
        INSERT INTO EMPLOYEE VALUES (3, 2, 'Matilda', 'Secretary');
    INSERT INTO EMPLOYEE VALUES (4, 1, 'Steve', 'Manager');
        INSERT INTO EMPLOYEE VALUES (5, 4, 'John', 'Senior Worker');
            INSERT INTO EMPLOYEE VALUES (6, 5, 'Paul', 'Junior Worker');
        INSERT INTO EMPLOYEE VALUES (7, 4, 'Anny', 'Senior Worker');

The following query returns Steve and all of his subordinates recursively:

SELECT *
FROM EMPLOYEE
START WITH EMPLOYEE_ID = 4
CONNECT BY PRIOR EMPLOYEE_ID = MANAGER_ID;

EMPLOYEE_ID        MANAGER_ID         NAME                 TITLE                
------------------ ------------------ -------------------- -------------------- 
4                  1                  Steve                Manager              
5                  4                  John                 Senior Worker        
6                  5                  Paul                 Junior Worker        
7                  4                  Anny                 Senior Worker        

"Flipping" the PRIOR gives us Steve's superiors instead:

SELECT *
FROM EMPLOYEE
START WITH EMPLOYEE_ID = 4
CONNECT BY EMPLOYEE_ID = PRIOR MANAGER_ID;

EMPLOYEE_ID        MANAGER_ID         NAME                 TITLE                
------------------ ------------------ -------------------- -------------------- 
4                  1                  Steve                Manager              
1                                     Rob                  CEO                  
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Very nice Branko –  jdross Apr 11 '12 at 21:18

Something like this should work:

select lpad(' ', 2*(level-1)) || name as employeename
from employee_table
start with employeeid = 1000
connect by prior employeeid = managerid; 

The lpad() function is used to indent the results so you can see who reports to whom.

If you don't want employeeid 1000 included in the results, just change:

start with employeeid = 1000

to:

start with managerid = 1000
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