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Curious if anyone knows (or can easily test) the time it takes to reference and then dereference an array.

my @foo = (0..1500000);     # (~1.5M nodes).
join('',@{\@foo});          # any noticeable time difference vs join('',@foo) ?

There's obviously no legitimate reason for this, but I've come across unreasonable code :)

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4  
use Benchmark; ? –  pilcrow Apr 11 '12 at 21:27
    
Start with use Benchmark; and compare your different methods. –  dgw Apr 11 '12 at 21:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Benchmarks of similar tests I've performed gave something on the order 10 nanoseconds per deref. There's only deref in the code you posted, so we're talking about a 0.000,000,010s difference.


Bah, the difference is so tiny, that I can't even reliably tell which one is faster!

Benchmark: running array, array_ref for at least 3 CPU seconds...
     array:  3 wallclock secs ( 3.04 usr +  0.02 sys =  3.06 CPU) @ 11.12/s (n=34)
 array_ref:  3 wallclock secs ( 3.13 usr +  0.00 sys =  3.13 CPU) @ 11.48/s (n=36)

Benchmark: running array, array_ref for at least 3 CPU seconds...
     array:  3 wallclock secs ( 3.06 usr +  0.03 sys =  3.09 CPU) @ 11.33/s (n=35)
 array_ref:  3 wallclock secs ( 3.12 usr +  0.05 sys =  3.17 CPU) @ 11.37/s (n=36)

Benchmark: running array, array_ref for at least 3 CPU seconds...
     array:  3 wallclock secs ( 3.06 usr +  0.00 sys =  3.06 CPU) @ 11.45/s (n=35)
 array_ref:  3 wallclock secs ( 3.18 usr +  0.00 sys =  3.18 CPU) @ 11.31/s (n=36)

Benchmark: running array, array_ref for at least 3 CPU seconds...
     array:  3 wallclock secs ( 3.09 usr +  0.00 sys =  3.09 CPU) @ 11.66/s (n=36)
 array_ref:  3 wallclock secs ( 3.17 usr +  0.00 sys =  3.17 CPU) @ 11.37/s (n=36)

array is faster 50% of the time, array ref is faster 50% of the time.

use strict;
use warnings;

use Benchmark qw( timethese );

my %tests = (
   array_ref => 'my $x = join("", @$foo);',
   array     => 'my $x = join("", @foo);',
);

$_ = 'use strict; use warnings; our $foo; our @foo; ' . $_
   for values(%tests);

our @foo = 1..1_500_000;
our $foo = \@foo;

timethese(-3, \%tests);

Here's a better test than the one you posted. The only you posted spent less than 1% of the time doing the thing you wanted to test.

But again, the different is so small, that it's not measurable. Sometimes array ref appears faster, sometimes the array appears faster.

Actual speed is actually 1000x larger than indicated.
Benchmark: running array, array_ref for at least 3 CPU seconds...
     array:  3 wallclock secs ( 3.09 usr +  0.00 sys =  3.09 CPU) @ 1015.54/s (n=3136)
 array_ref:  3 wallclock secs ( 3.24 usr +  0.00 sys =  3.24 CPU) @ 1040.99/s (n=3378)

Actual speed is actually 1000x larger than indicated.
Benchmark: running array, array_ref for at least 3 CPU seconds...
     array:  3 wallclock secs ( 3.25 usr +  0.00 sys =  3.25 CPU) @ 1011.09/s (n=3281)
 array_ref:  3 wallclock secs ( 3.07 usr +  0.00 sys =  3.07 CPU) @ 1022.13/s (n=3141)

Actual speed is actually 1000x larger than indicated.
Benchmark: running array, array_ref for at least 3 CPU seconds...
     array:  3 wallclock secs ( 3.29 usr +  0.00 sys =  3.29 CPU) @ 1020.96/s (n=3361)
 array_ref:  3 wallclock secs ( 3.20 usr +  0.00 sys =  3.20 CPU) @ 1016.26/s (n=3250)

Actual speed is actually 1000x larger than indicated.
Benchmark: running array, array_ref for at least 3 CPU seconds...
     array:  3 wallclock secs ( 3.07 usr +  0.00 sys =  3.07 CPU) @ 1053.03/s (n=3237)
 array_ref:  4 wallclock secs ( 3.23 usr +  0.00 sys =  3.23 CPU) @ 1006.50/s (n=3250)

Again, array is faster 50% of the time, array ref is faster 50% of the time.

use strict;
use warnings;

use Benchmark qw( timethese );

my %tests = (
   array_ref => 'my $x = join("", @$foo);',
   array     => 'my $x = join("", @foo);',
);

$_ = 'use strict; use warnings; our $foo; our @foo; for (1..1000) { '.$_.' }'
   for values(%tests);

our @foo = 1..15;
our $foo = \@foo;

print("Actual speed is actually 1000x larger than indicated.\n");
timethese(-3, \%tests);
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3  
@vol7ron, Added benchmarks. Then added better benchmarks. The speed difference is so small that it can't even be measured. –  ikegami Apr 11 '12 at 22:25
    
The difference in speed can't be seen from this code as you have drowned it in irrelevant loop tests, scalar assignments, and most of all the join call. The time taken to dereference an array reference presumably doesn't depend on the size of the array so it need have only one element, and the code being compared should be simply @foo vs @$foo. I make it about 240ns and 440ns respectively. –  Borodin Apr 12 '12 at 1:00
    
@Borodin: it's your second point that I was really trying to figure out. Does the time taken to dereference an array reference depend on the size of the array? Great way to phrase it, thank you. –  vol7ron Apr 12 '12 at 1:35
    
@vol7ron, The time to deref one scalar does not depend on the size of any array. That should be clear from the very first sentence of my answer. –  ikegami Apr 12 '12 at 4:17
    
@Borodin, you are dead wrong. The test show that @foo is sometimes faster than @$foo, and that somestimes @$foo is faster than @foo. What do you think is being drowned? if the time different is sometimes larger than zero and sometimes smaller than zero, it is impossible to measure. Nothing is being drowned; the result are very specific. –  ikegami Apr 12 '12 at 4:26

A naive benchmark shows that there is no discernible difference among different methods of concatenating integers from 1 to 1,500,000 into a single string (except, there is a wrong way -- not shown below).

I do wonder why one would need to create such a string, but then I wonder a lot.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict; use warnings;
use Benchmark qw( cmpthese );

my @nodes = (1 .. 1_500_000);

cmpthese -5, {
    derefref_join => sub {
        my $str = join('', @{ \@nodes });
    },
    plain_join => sub {
        my $str = join('', @nodes);
    },
    interpolate => sub {
        local $" = '';
        my $str = "@nodes";
    },
};

Output:

                Rate   interpolate derefref_join    plain_join
interpolate   4.76/s            --           -3%           -3%
derefref_join 4.89/s            3%            --           -1%
plain_join    4.92/s            4%            1%            --
C:\temp> perl -v

This is perl 5, version 14, subversion 2 (v5.14.2) built for MSWin32-x86-multi-thread
Binary build 1402 [295342] provided by ActiveState http://www.ActiveState.com
Built Oct  7 2011 15:49:44

Intel Core2 Duo T2300E@1.66Ghz, 2GB ram.
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1  
This is an example of how not to focus on the minor details, and focus rather on the algorithm used. Not a great example, because the results are still within 5% of each other. (Anything under 5% is unreliable. Different runs can vary by that much.) –  ikegami Apr 11 '12 at 22:35
    
@ikegami Added note to clarify that the benchmark script shows no difference -- just to make it really clear ;-) –  Sinan Ünür Apr 11 '12 at 22:48
    
I figured as much, didn't have time to test it. This is all I was looking for though :) –  vol7ron Apr 12 '12 at 1:30

It will differ per host machine due to processor speed, obviously.

A way to measure this would be to use the time function to record the time. Then create and execute a loop of 10's of thousands of dereferencing operations (because measuring a single dereference will be so fast you won't be able to measure it.) Afterwards, record the time again. Subtract the times and divide by the number of times through the loop. Subtract from this the time it takes to go through the loop without the dereference. A little math, and you have it.

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2  
You should also ignore outlying results. The Benchmark modules does all this for you. –  ikegami Apr 11 '12 at 22:32

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