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Hey guys im trying to delete all instances of an item in a list using haskell. I get an error that i dont really understand. Im a haskell noob. Can anyone help me out and let me know if im doing the correct thing. Thanks :)

deleteAllInstances :: (a, [l]) =>  a -> [l] -> [l]
deleteAllInstances (a, []) = []
deleteAllInstances (i, (x:xs))
    | i == x = tail
    | otherwise = x ++ tail
    where tail = deleteAllInstances i xs
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2  
Which error do you get? –  Riccardo Apr 11 '12 at 21:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

First, the type signature is malformed.

deleteAllInstances :: (a, [l]) =>  a -> [l] -> [l]

A type signature has the form

name :: (Constraints) => type

where Constraints involve type classes, like (Ord a, Show a). In this case, the function uses (==), so there must be a constraint of the form Eq a.

Then the function definition doesn't match the type part, you defined it to take a pair as argument, while the type signature says otherwise (your definition is uncurried, the type is curried).

deleteAllInstances (a, []) = []
deleteAllInstances (i, (x:xs))
    | i == x = tail
    | otherwise = x ++ tail
    where tail = deleteAllInstances i xs

then you use (++) to glue an element to the front of a list, but (++) concatenates two lists, you need (:) here.

The simplest way to define the function would be to use filter

deleteAllInstances :: Eq a => a -> [a] -> [a]
deleteAllInstances a xs = filter (/= a) xs

but if you want to do the explicit recursion yourself,

deleteAllInstances :: Eq a => a -> [a] -> [a]
deleteAllInstances a (x:xs)
    | a == x    = rest
    | otherwise = x : rest
      where
        rest = deleteAllInstances a xs
deleteAllInstances _ _ = []
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What if I wanted this to also work on strings instead of just numbers –  cclerville Apr 11 '12 at 22:16
5  
There's nothing here that mentions numbers, it works with every type that is an instance of Eq, including String, [String] and so on. It has the most general type it can have, so it works for everything it can possibly work for. (You can get rid of the Eq constraint by having a parameter (a -> a -> Bool) which says which values should be considered 'equal'; the Eq class provides that function quasi as an implicit parameter.) –  Daniel Fischer Apr 11 '12 at 22:25
1  
You're right. Thanks! :) –  cclerville Apr 11 '12 at 23:21

I'm not sure what you're trying to do with the (a, [l]) before the =>, but I don't think it necessary. Syntax there is usually reserved for specifying what type a and l should satisfy.

Also, your function takes two arguments, a and [l], as you've specified later in the function definition. However, your implementation of the function only takes one argument, a tuple. As I mentioned before, the tuple only serves to specify what types the arguments should be, and cannot be pattern matched against.

deleteAllInstances :: a -> [l] -> [l]
deleteAllInstances a [] = []
deleteAllInstances i (x:xs)
    | i == x = rest
    | otherwise = x : rest
    where rest = deleteAllInstances i xs

If you wanted to write it using filter, you can always use the following code

deleteAllInstances :: a -> [a] -> [a]
deleteAllInstances a = filter (/=a)
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i actually find list comprehension to be a very intuitive notation for problems like this:

deleteAllInstances :: Eq a => a -> [a] -> [a]
deleteAllInstances a list = [x | x <- list, x /= a]
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It's not faster - both are O(n). Also even chaining multiple functions like filter will still be O(n) due Fusion, e.g. filter f . map f' . filter f'' is still O(n). –  Nikita Volkov Jun 16 '13 at 8:45
    
the complexity is the obviously the same, however as far as i understand ghc, the compiled code will be faster, as list comprehensions are resolved to plain recursions, and you thus save the call to filter. it might depend on the complexity of the constraints. –  thrau Jun 16 '13 at 14:06
1  
Actually, list comprehensions are just an alternative syntax for do-notation and thus your comprehension first resolves to list >>= \a' -> if a' /= a then return a' else []. After that the optimizer does in fact do the translation to plain recursions, but it does it to the produced functions, as well as it would have done to any other functions which are subject to Fusion. filter and map are subject to fusion too, and that's why the produced compiler code should be identical to yours. You can experiment with ghc-core util, you'll be surprised by what the optimizer can actually do. –  Nikita Volkov Jun 16 '13 at 14:24
    
very interesting. thank you :) –  thrau Jun 16 '13 at 15:59

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