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I tried to sort directly the numbers I enter in a linked list using two functions the first one add the element at the head the second one which contain the segmentation fault is supposed to exploit the first one to do the job.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
typedef struct cellule
{
    int val;
    struct cellule *suivant;
} cellule;
typedef struct cellule* liste;

liste insert_tete(liste L,int n)
{

    liste p;

    p=malloc(sizeof(cellule));
    p->val=n;
    p->suivant=L;
    return p;
}//ok :)
liste insert_croissant(liste L,int n)
{
    if(!L)
    {
        L=insert_tete(L,n);
        return L;
    }

    liste p,q;
    for(q=L,p=L; (p!=NULL )&&(n> (p->val)) ; q=p,p=p->suivant); //

    p=insert_tete(p,n);
    q->suivant=p;
    return L;
}
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3  
Please reformat your code to make it easier to read. –  Adam Mihalcin Apr 11 '12 at 22:11
4  
insert_croissant() sounds delicious! –  FatalError Apr 11 '12 at 22:12
3  
Don't cast the return value of malloc in C. There is no reason to do so and it can actually hide the fact that you forgot to include <stdlib.h> (without the cast, the nonexistant function is implied to return int, which will fail, but the cast hides it). C has no problem coercing a void* to any other pointer type implicitly. –  Ed S. Apr 11 '12 at 22:13
1  
Also, descriptive variable names are nice. –  Ed S. Apr 11 '12 at 22:15
2  
@BrettHale, yes it is well defined. The comma here is a "comma operator" and each such comma operator defines a sequence point. –  Jens Gustedt Apr 11 '12 at 22:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The code has a problem where the list can get corrupted in certain cases; it's easy to get the list into a state where it's not properly terminated (and possibly 'lose' nodes from the list). And that situation could cause problems depending on how other code might manipulate the list.

If you try to add a new node on a list that isn't empty, but the new value is less than or equal to the first node's value, the list will end up being a circular list with two nodes on it. Any nodes after the one that was at the head of the list are lost.

This happens because in that case both p and q will point to that node when insert_tete(p,n) is called. After insert_tete(p,n) returns, p-suivant and q will be pointing to the node at the head of the list. so when

q->suivant = p;

is executed, the list will be circular and 'extra' nodes will be lost.

Depending on how your other operations act on the list, (especially if/how you delete elements) you could find yourself with a dangling pointer left in a suivant field (which may cause a segfault), or end up in an infinite loop.

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thank you ,I the code is fully functional now :) –  orangepixel Apr 12 '12 at 0:46

By no means do I believe this will fix it, but there is at least one bug in your code.

Consider the case where L is initialized, but n < L->val:

// p = L, q = L;
// Let L = [val|->...
p=insert_tete(p,n);
// p = [n|->[val|->...
q->suivant=p;
// q = L
// Therefore [val|->[n|->L
// And you've just made your linked list circular.
share|improve this answer
    
You're right. The insert_tete() will set p->suivant = p. Furthermore, the pointer that points to p will not be updated, so the q subchain will become disconnected from the p chain. –  wildplasser Apr 11 '12 at 23:11
    
Sorry about the extra answer though - I haven't been active enough to actually have privilege to comment... –  Michael Apr 11 '12 at 23:17
    
No, it is excellent. I could not spot it after studying it for ten minutes. The problem is: there are too many aliases floating around. (I can't vote, because I am not registered) please vote parent up! –  wildplasser Apr 11 '12 at 23:23
    
@wildplasser What do you mean "not registered"? You're a regular here, aren't you? Anyway, Michael, yes, wildplasser is right, it's a good answer that adds something new, so it gets you at least 10 points nearer to comment privileges (in other words, +1 from me). I overlooked that too, btw. –  Daniel Fischer Apr 11 '12 at 23:28
    
Well: click on my bio. It says unregistered. It's my love for Graucho Marx that keeps me from registering. –  wildplasser Apr 11 '12 at 23:32
liste insert_croissant(liste L,int n)
{
    if(!L)
    {
        L=insert_tete(L,n);
        return L;
    }

Here we know that L is not NULL

    liste p,q;
    for(q=L,p=L; (p!=NULL )&&(n> (p->val)) ; q=p,p=p->suivant); //

The only way to get a legitimate segfault here is that one of the pointers p follows is a non-0 pointer that doesn't point to a properly allocated struct cellule, but to some inaccessible memory. Then trying to access p->val (or p->suivant) causes a segfault.

The most common way (in my limited experience) to get into that situation is forgetting to initialise the first pointer to 0.

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Simplified version using pointer-to-pointer. Note: there is no special case for the empty list.

struct cellule {
    int val;
    struct cellule *suivant;
    };

struct cellule *insert_croissant(struct cellule **LL, int val)
{

    struct cellule *p,**pp;

    for(pp=LL  ; *pp && (*pp)->val < val ; pp = &(*pp)->suivant) {;}
      /* When we arrive here, pp points to whatever pointer happens
      ** to point to our current node.
      ** - If the list was empty, *pp==NULL
      ** - if the place to insert happens to be the tail of the list, *p is also NULL        
      ** - in all cases, *pp should be placed after the new node, and the new node's pointer should be assigned to *pp
      */
    p = malloc(sizeof *p);
    p->val = val;
    p->suivant = *pp;
    *pp = p;

    return *LL;

}
share|improve this answer
    
this is far better , i think in that case it is not a good idea to use the existing function which insert at the head, thank you! –  orangepixel Apr 12 '12 at 0:44

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